Matching Items (44)

  C2C Interview: Lyn Ribisi Interview with Jane Sellers Hancock

Description

Jane was born Jane Sellers in 1927. She was born in Pomeroy, Ohio- town on the Ohio River that was eight miles long and half a mile wide. After graduating

Jane was born Jane Sellers in 1927. She was born in Pomeroy, Ohio- town on the Ohio River that was eight miles long and half a mile wide. After graduating from East Grand Rapids High School in 1944, she attended MacMurray College in Jacksonville, IL where she earned her BA in Liberal Arts in 1948. Then, one year later, she received a Master's in Education and her teacher's certificate from the University of Southern California.
In 1949, she got her first teaching job in Victorville, CA where she stayed there until January 1961, when she moved to Glendale, California and taught at Toll Junior High School. She became a Fellow and co-director in the UCLA Writing Project. Ms. Hancock taught until she was eighty-eight, when an illness forced her to retire in 2015. Currently, she gets great satisfaction from leading classes for local writers once a week and another one for teachers which meets once a month. Jane is widowed with five grown sons, many grandchildren, and one great-grandchild.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-11-12

  C2C Interview with Allyson Bogie

Description

This is an audio interview with Allyson Bogie a librarian at Fred Korematsu Middle School in the West Contra Costa Unified School District in the San Francisco Bay area of

This is an audio interview with Allyson Bogie a librarian at Fred Korematsu Middle School in the West Contra Costa Unified School District in the San Francisco Bay area of northern California. This interview was recorded for the Connecting to Community Oral History Project (C2C). The interview includes Ms. Bogie’s background, her training as a teacher through the Teach for America program, her transition to library work and her perspective on some local issues of diversity within her school environment. She discusses topics including parental involvement and expectations, and working in a school with a multi-ethnic student body.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-11-13

A Guide to Coaching Color Guard

Description

This entire project looks at color guard from the perspective of a music educator and is meant to be a resource for other music educators, specifically, color guard instructors. Within

This entire project looks at color guard from the perspective of a music educator and is meant to be a resource for other music educators, specifically, color guard instructors. Within the thesis project “A Guide to Coaching Color Guard” there are four sub-components.

The first is a historical research paper titled “The History and Evolution of Color Guard within Marching Band”. This paper defines what color guard is, identifies its origins, and outlines the major events that contributed to its development over time, leading up to what the sport and art of color guard has evolved into today.

The second component is a paper titled “Coaching Color Guard: My Experiences with Planning, Teaching, and Building a High School Color Guard Program”, which is a summarization of how a season of coaching color guard can be organized and examples of various learning opportunities a color guard coach could take advantage of during a season. Many education-specific teaching strategies are explained, such as the use of modeling, I do - we do - you do, whole-part-whole, scaffolding, sequencing from simple to complex, direct instruction vs. small groups, teaching to various learning styles (visual, auditory, kinesthetic), instructor/peer/group feedback, assessment, and opportunities for student contribution and creativity.

The third component is paper titled “Color Guard Coaching Resources”, which is made up of ten different documents that are examples or resources for color guard instructors. These resources are referenced in the second component of this project and include samples of flyers, audition scoring sheets, a student handbook, participation sheet, and written choreography as well as providing a list of other outside resources as well as a list of the video tutorials.

These video tutorials are the final component of this project. There are 44 tutorial videos broken up into five categories. Each video is a step-by-step teaching video demonstrating and articulating how to spin a color guard flag. The first category consists of 10 introductory videos, which discuss terms and concepts that are overarching in all of the tutorial videos. Then, there are 23 tutorials within the category titled ‘Basic Moves’. The next category of ‘Intermediate Moves’ consists of 5 teaching videos for moves that are more difficult to execute than the basic moves. The fourth category has 5 video tutorials for ‘Tosses’. The last category is called ‘Move Sequences’ and only has 1 video. This tutorial shows how some moves have similar rotation patterns and can easily be strung together to create a choreography sequence.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

134824-Thumbnail Image.png

Dieva: A Constructed Language

Description

What is it like to create your own language? This creative project is an amalgamation of several paper, visual, and online media and is divided into two sections. The first

What is it like to create your own language? This creative project is an amalgamation of several paper, visual, and online media and is divided into two sections. The first section is the creation of an original fantasy constructed language ("conlang") called Dieva, including setting and background, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, language rules, an alphabet and writing system, and vocabulary. The second section is an exercise in applied linguistics, wherein the conlang was shared with the public via media including an online Wikia.com webpage; figures including charts and a map; the development of classroom materials for a hypothetical Dieva language class such as introduction worksheets, practice worksheets, and quizzes on the alphabet and numbers; and a "linguistic challenge" logic puzzle. All materials were then shared with volunteers who gave feedback from a myriad of teaching and non-teaching as well as linguist and non-linguist points of view. Volunteers also attempted to take the quizzes and to solve the "linguistic challenge," and their feedback was integrated into the final versions of the language, worksheets, online webpages, and other work.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

135072-Thumbnail Image.png

Giftedness and EBD: How Do We Accommodate For High School and University Students Who Have Both?

Description

Disability Resource and Counseling centers were interviewed across universities and high schools regarding how they accommodate twice exceptional students in giftedness and emotional behavioral disorders. This study highlights the services

Disability Resource and Counseling centers were interviewed across universities and high schools regarding how they accommodate twice exceptional students in giftedness and emotional behavioral disorders. This study highlights the services available to 2e students and provides effective accommodations and support solutions.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

134207-Thumbnail Image.png

A Teacher's Guide to Transformational Play and Dramatic Agency

Description

The principles of transformational play challenge the assumption that learning and "real life" are inherently separate spheres, and instead, intimately connect the two spheres by integrating the often separate treatment

The principles of transformational play challenge the assumption that learning and "real life" are inherently separate spheres, and instead, intimately connect the two spheres by integrating the often separate treatment of person, content, and context. By positioning person, content, and context in a way that traditional learning environments cannot, transformational play puts students in the role of active protagonists in their own learning and positions them to use their growing knowledge to make authentic choices that can affect problems they face in reality and thereby transform: the circumstances of their lives, the way they understand knowledge as a functional asset, and the way they see themselves as agents with the ability to act and create change. This can be especially empowering to students who have thus far been facing a feeling of hopelessness or powerlessness in their lives. Teachers can apply the concepts behind transformational play throughout the learning process to improve the consequentiality of students' learning experiences.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-12

135857-Thumbnail Image.png

Teaching Chinese at ASPC-EYMAN

Description

What is the value of postsecondary education in prison? For the past two years, my involvement with the Prison English Program in the Department of English at Arizona State University

What is the value of postsecondary education in prison? For the past two years, my involvement with the Prison English Program in the Department of English at Arizona State University has pushed me to explore answers to this question. I began by teaching creative writing for one semester through the Pen Project, an online internship in which undergraduate students provide critical responses to writing produced by inmates at the Penitentiary of New Mexico. The next two semesters, I co-­‐taught Shakespeare on a minimum-­‐security yard at the Arizona State Prison Complex in Florence. This semester, eager to expand my teaching repertoire and the breadth of ASU programming in Arizona prisons, I teach an introductory Chinese language course at the Cook Unit in Eyman.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

135300-Thumbnail Image.png

Proposing a Pedagogical Partnership Dance Program to the Arizona State University School of Film, Dance, and Theatre

Description

According to a survey conducted by the National Endowment for the Arts, 32% of adults in the United States participated in social dancing in 2012, more than any other form

According to a survey conducted by the National Endowment for the Arts, 32% of adults in the United States participated in social dancing in 2012, more than any other form of art-making and art-sharing. Partnership dance styles including Ballroom, Latin, and Swing are the most commonly practiced forms of social dancing. T.V. shows like "Dancing with the Stars" and "So You Think You Can Dance" have piqued the interest of local high schools in partnership dance. Arizona State University's (ASU) School of Film, Dance and Theatre (SoFDT) is uniquely positioned to leverage the large partnership dance program and the vibrant Phoenix Metro partnership dance community to address this interest. The School of Film Dance and Theatre should implement a course teaching partnership dance in local high schools. The class will be modeled after existing student teaching programs with changes made to reflect the requirements of teaching partnership dance. Specifically, ASU students will spend one day a week teaching a partnership module in a local high school and one day a week developing pedagogical skills in a lecture and discussion group format. High school students will learn the basic steps of 3 dances and perform a partnership dance showcase. ASU students will get hands-on experience teaching as part of a team in high school settings. This program fulfils ASU and SoFDT goals by making dance accessible to new audiences and engaging students in the local community. This proposed program benefits current undergraduate students by developing a functional understanding of teaching partnership dance in a group setting. Beyond ASU, it stands to give high school students a chance to learn a cost-prohibitive art and teach them a lifelong skill.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

133043-Thumbnail Image.png

Continue to Teach: Compiling Virtual Resources to Combat Teacher Attrition

Description

Continue to Teach is a project motivated by the alarming rates of teacher attrition in Arizona and across the United States. The product is in the form of a website

Continue to Teach is a project motivated by the alarming rates of teacher attrition in Arizona and across the United States. The product is in the form of a website that gives current and future teachers resources in attempts to support them. The goal of providing these virtual resources is to positively influence teachers to stay in the profession. Each of the subsections of the website were thoughtfully selected based on extensive consideration of the research literature of the factors driving teachers' decisions to remain or leave the profession. I was personally motivated to complete this project because I am studying and practicing to become a teacher. Completing this research and project has compelled me to learn a great amount about the challenges surrounding this profession, and has assisted me in determining what I can do to stay personally motivated while helping others continue to teach as well.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05