Matching Items (15)

134359-Thumbnail Image.png

Human Trafficking in Peru: A case study examining how U.S. Embassies can collaborate with host country governments and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) to combat human trafficking

Description

Human trafficking is not a new problem, but has gained recognition in the last decade as one of the world's most serious and large-scale violations of human rights. Though the

Human trafficking is not a new problem, but has gained recognition in the last decade as one of the world's most serious and large-scale violations of human rights. Though the figures vary wildly due to insufficient data, the U.S. State Department estimates that there are as many as 20 million victims of trafficking around the world. As more attention is shifted towards the problem, even the most developed nations of the world are recognizing the gravity of human trafficking and slavery within their borders. Stories of trafficking have many similarities across borders and cultures, but all countries have unique methods of addressing this issue in their own backyard. In response to the rising interest in this issue both academically and politically, this honors thesis is intended to contribute to the literature on human trafficking in the Peruvian case. Specifically, this document examines how U.S. Embassies can influence anti trafficking efforts abroad through effective collaboration with host county governments and NGOs. The argument of this paper is that, through collaboration with these two partners, U.S. Embassies can improve the existing anti-trafficking efforts, or aid in the creation of new ones. In order to explore this argument, I examine how the U.S. Embassy in Lima works with the Peruvian government and Peruvian non-governmental organizations (NGO) on combating trafficking.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

131197-Thumbnail Image.png

Pimps, Prostitutes, and Providers: How Educating Healthcare Providers Impacts Beliefs, Knowledge, and Perceptions on Sex Trafficking

Description

Human trafficking is a widespread global health issue impacting communities both locally and globally. Despite its prevalence in our world, there is a lack of education amongst healthcare providers. Research

Human trafficking is a widespread global health issue impacting communities both locally and globally. Despite its prevalence in our world, there is a lack of education amongst healthcare providers. Research suggests that more than 80 percent of human trafficking victims encountered one or more healthcare professionals while being trafficked. Of these providers encountered, 60 percent were emergency department personnel (Lederer & Wetzel, 2014). Although emergency department personnel have a high rate in interaction with victims, less than 5 percent have received formal training regarding human trafficking (Lederer & Wetzel, 2014). It is my goal to better educate current and future healthcare professionals on human trafficking. Through education, more victims can be recognized and be offered the resources they deserve. In order to do this, I want to understand current perceptions, knowledge, and beliefs that healthcare personnel have, and how education affects these perceptions. To gain this information, I will distribute the same survey to healthcare professionals before and after receiving a formal training on human trafficking. Through this survey, I hope to better understand how education affects people’s perceptions, knowledge, and beliefs on human trafficking.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

135388-Thumbnail Image.png

Defining Sex Trafficking: A Rights-Based Approach

Description

Abstract. The term "sex trafficking" can mean many different things, depending on who uses it. To some, it may be synonymous with prostitution. To others, it may equate to slavery.

Abstract. The term "sex trafficking" can mean many different things, depending on who uses it. To some, it may be synonymous with prostitution. To others, it may equate to slavery. And some may find that sex trafficking differs from both slavery and prostitution. But I find that the term "sex trafficking" is used improperly when referring to phenomena that may not entail the violation of rights of any individual involved. For this reason, various definitions of "sex trafficking" may inappropriately conflate sex trafficking with prostitution. In this essay, I argue against such a conflation through supporting a rights-based approach of defining "sex trafficking," in which every instance of true sex trafficking necessitates a violation of someone's rights. First, I begin by laying the foundation of my discussion with definitions and various government and non-government uses of the term "sex trafficking." Then, I argue for the rights-based approach. I proceed to explore how the rights-based approach relates to consent, force, coercion, deception, and competence. Then, I compile my findings, synthesize a definition, and elaborate on a few questions regarding my definition. Using the term "sex trafficking" correctly, as I argue, means that we necessarily use the term in a context of a violation of rights.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

133278-Thumbnail Image.png

Pre-Post Intervention Evaluation on Human Trafficking Knowledge, Beliefs, and Awareness of Health Care Professionals and Students

Description

Human trafficking is not only a social injustice, but also a major global health problem, that our communities cannot ignore. Despite the common misconception that trafficking is only seen in

Human trafficking is not only a social injustice, but also a major global health problem, that our communities cannot ignore. Despite the common misconception that trafficking is only seen in foreign countries or is only related to immigrants, the U.S. is known to be a major trafficking market and destination, with trafficking reported in all 50 states (Bladwin et al., 2011; Shandro et al., 2016; Dovydaitis, 2010). Although trafficking victims are unlikely to have appropriate access to health care, as much as 80% of sex trafficking victims have reported that they encountered a medical professional while under their traffickers' control and went unidentified at the time (Baldwin et al., 2011; Shandro et al., 2016). This exemplifies a serious missed opportunity for intervention. Health care providers should be prepared to identify and care for victims of trafficking as part of their routine clinical practice. This thesis aims to describe trafficking victims' encounters in U.S. health care settings, to assess health care professionals' and students' awareness, knowledge, and beliefs on trafficking, to examine the impact of an educational intervention on this populations' knowledge/belief changes, and to ultimately spread education about this issue to a wide array of communities.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

133344-Thumbnail Image.png

Evaluating the Elements of a Convictable Sex Trafficking Case Based on Perceptions of Vice Units Nationwide

Description

In recent years, sex trafficking awareness and intervention have skyrocketed in the United States. The 2016 Polaris Hotline Statistics Sheet reports a drastic increase of reported sex trafficking cases over

In recent years, sex trafficking awareness and intervention have skyrocketed in the United States. The 2016 Polaris Hotline Statistics Sheet reports a drastic increase of reported sex trafficking cases over the span of four years, with only 3,409 cases of human trafficking in 2012 and 8,042 in 2016, 73% of which were specifically sex trafficking cases (Polaris Project, 2016). The incidence of sex trafficking has not increased, but rather, attention to sex trafficking and implementation of legislation has increased awareness and reporting (Farrell et al., 2012). While this rise in public awareness of sex trafficking has positively impacted victim identification, there has not been an increase in convicting sex traffickers (Polaris Project, 2016). According to the 2016 Trafficking in Persons Report, 3,000 federal investigations that involved human trafficking, the majority of which specifically involved sex trafficking, were opened in 2015. Of these federal investigations, only 10% led to case prosecutions. Analyzing the relationship of law enforcement, specifically vice units, and victims of sex trafficking is just one of the many ways to address this complex issue. This study consisted of a qualitative analysis of the makeup, training, and policing methods of vice units nationwide. It further aimed to determine the vice officer perceptions regarding the elements that make sex trafficking cases convictable.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

131446-Thumbnail Image.png

An Explorative Analysis of Blockchain Technology as a Tool for Human Trafficking Prevention

Description

Blockchain technology has the potential to be an effective form of identity management and human trafficking prevention as an identity solution. The topic of this thesis originates from the United

Blockchain technology has the potential to be an effective form of identity management and human trafficking prevention as an identity solution. The topic of this thesis originates from the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goal to create a form of identity for every individual on the plant by the year 2030. This research analyzed and compared primarily global databases with information on human trafficking populations and unidentified populations to understand both issues, and the intersections of their populations. This is followed by a discussion of Blockchain technology’s attributes and a Blockchain identities potential characteristic. This research concludes that a Blockchain based identity can be used to mitigate human trafficking by creating various forms of identity for affected populations. Four basic factors of Blockchain technology can be utilized through public and private partnerships to address different parts of the AMP model for the cycle of human trafficking. The conclusion that Blockchain is a potential solution to the analyzed issues comes with caution and alongside an examination of the risk factors involved in implementing this technology and the future investigation necessary to test this conclusion. Risk factors with using blockchain technology as a solution are examined to help direct future research on the topic. The conclusion is based off Blockchain’s ability to address specific problems in human trafficking and the global identity crisis (GIC) that were found in the analysis.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

532-Thumbnail Image.png

An Education for Mental Health Care Providers: Sex Trafficking Victim Identification

Description

Purpose: The purpose of this project was to examine if a relationship existed between the changes in attitude and knowledge of a mental health care provider, before and after an

Purpose: The purpose of this project was to examine if a relationship existed between the changes in attitude and knowledge of a mental health care provider, before and after an educational intervention was given on how to identify sex trafficking victims.

Background: According to the National Trafficking Hotline (2017), last year there were over 5,000 cases of sex trafficking reported. Lederer & Wetzel (2014) discuss that more than 88% of victims interact with a health care provider while being trafficked at least once. A majority of cases, mental health care providers were informed that their patient was a sex trafficking victim through collaboration of other services. Without this collaboration, many providers would have never
known that they had interacted with a victim (Domoney, Howard, Abas, Broadben, & Oram, 2015).

Methods: The participant population consisted of psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners and psychologists working in acute and out patient settings.
A pre survey was given to identify the participant’s knowledge of sex trafficking and their awareness of available resources and tools to help screen as well as treat victims of sex trafficking. After completion, the participants viewed an educational voice over presentation that educated them on how to identify current sex trafficking victims, what screening tools are available, the mental health risk factors and how to protect both the victim and provider from potential danger from the alleged trafficker. A post survey was then given to assess their knowledge after the presentation intervention, how much they retained and their confidence in being able to assess and treat sex trafficking victims. All surveys and the presentation were available online for participant convenience via a private link.

Results: The knowledge posttest score was higher than the pretest (Z=-2.694, p<0.007).
The confidence score on treating sex trafficking victims was higher posttest (Z=-2.251, p<0.024) No significant change in attitudes for advocating for sex trafficking victim care. All providers agreed that this high-risk vulnerable population needs advocates (Z=4.67, p<0.707).

Conclusion: All providers agreed for the need to advocate for victim care prior to the educational intervention. The results suggest that mental health providers are more knowledgeable posttest about risk factors, have a higher level of confidence in treating sex trafficking victims and have a higher confidence in their ability to protect victims and provide adequate care.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-04-29

132567-Thumbnail Image.png

How Three Communities Support Human Trafficking Survivors

Description

Human trafficking is the focus of this study and explaining the ways different communities in the world handle their specific concerns of human trafficking, with a focus on a nonprofit

Human trafficking is the focus of this study and explaining the ways different communities in the world handle their specific concerns of human trafficking, with a focus on a nonprofit in each community. Human trafficking is a global issue and different communities address it in different ways. Human trafficking is the focus of this study and explaining the ways different communities in the world handle their specific concerns of human trafficking, with a focus on a nonprofit in each community. This thesis will focus on how three communities- Ghana, France and Spain, in the world are working with human trafficking victims. Field research at each site was conducted including meetings with service providers to explore the issue of human trafficking in the region including the laws, victimization patterns, and how the community was responding to the problem. A set of questions was asked at each site and this thesis is the summation of the findings from the field research. This study was approved by the Arizona State University Institution Review Board, (see Appendix A). The overall findings of this study found that each community need is very different, so each community response has been tailored to the victims of trafficking and what they require and must include the victim in the solution. Each location has different victims, locations and responses.
Keywords: sex trafficking, France, Ghana, human trafficking, NGO, research, Spain

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

153055-Thumbnail Image.png

Punishing criminals or protecting victims: a critical mixed methods analysis of state statutes related to prostitution and sex trafficking

Description

This study uses the ontological lenses of discourse theory to conduct a critical mixed-methods analysis of state statutes related to prostitution and sex trafficking. The primary research question of the

This study uses the ontological lenses of discourse theory to conduct a critical mixed-methods analysis of state statutes related to prostitution and sex trafficking. The primary research question of the study was, "How do state laws communicate and reinforce discourses related to sex trafficking and prostitution and how do these discourses reinforce hegemony and define the role of the state?" A mixed methods approach was used to analyze prostitution and sex trafficking related annotated and Shepardized statutes from all fifty states. The analysis found that not all prostitution related discourses found in the literature were present in state statutes. Instead, statutes could be organized around five different themes: child abuse, exploitation, criminalization, place, and licensing and regulation. A deeper analysis of discourses present across and within each of these themes illustrated an inconsistent understanding of prostitution as a social problem and an inconsistent understanding of the legitimate role of the state in regulating or criminalizing prostitution. The inconsistencies in the law suggest concerns for equal protection under the law based upon a person's perceived deservingness, which often hinges on his or her race, class, gender identity, sexuality, age, ability, and nationality. Implications for the field include insights into a substantive policy area rarely studied by policy and administration scholars, a unique approach to mixed methods research, and the use of a new technique for analyzing vast quantities of unstructured data.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014

158341-Thumbnail Image.png

Who is to Blame? The Impact of Race, Age, and Victimization Disclosure on the Blameworthiness of Human Trafficking Victims

Description

This study examined the effects of victim characteristics and past life experiences on attributions of blame to human trafficking victims in hypothetical scenarios. Specifically, this study investigates the main and

This study examined the effects of victim characteristics and past life experiences on attributions of blame to human trafficking victims in hypothetical scenarios. Specifically, this study investigates the main and interaction effects of the victim’s race, age, and victimization disclosure on outsider’s perceptions of blameworthiness. A factorial vignette survey that provided information about a victim altering her race (Black or White), current age (15 or 21), and availability of victimization disclosure was given to a university-based sample (N = 592). Utilizing three-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) for the analysis, the results showed that the main effects of the victim’s age and victimization disclosure significantly influenced attributions of blame. The results also indicated that there are significant two-way and three-way interactions. The conclusion highlights the importance of these findings as well as avenues for future research and potential programming.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020