Matching Items (9)

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Heart Failure Education in A VA Outpatient Clinic Delivered as Part of a Multidisciplinary Heart Failure Management Team

Description

There is an estimated 6.2 million people Americans over the age of 20 suffering from Heart Failure (HF) (Bejamin et. al., 2019). It is essential that HF patients have sufficient

There is an estimated 6.2 million people Americans over the age of 20 suffering from Heart Failure (HF) (Bejamin et. al., 2019). It is essential that HF patients have sufficient knowledge about the disease and self-management (Abbasi, Ghezeljeh, & Farahani, 2018; Dinh, Bonner, Ramsbotham & Clark, 2018). Lack of self-management is largely to blame for many HF exacerbations. Current evidence supports utilizing both verbal and written education with an emphasis on self-care and education delivered in a group setting or individual setting showed equal impact on self-care and HF knowledge ( Hoover, et. al., 2017; Ross et. al., 2015; Tawalbeh, 2018).

An outpatient VA clinic located in a suburb of the large metropolitan identified there was no consistency on how a HF patient was educated, managed, or tracked and the registered nurses (RNs) lacked knowledge of HF. As a results of these findings this Evidence Based Project (EBP) was implemented. RNs were educated on HF and completed a self-assessment questionnaire evaluating their knowledge pre and post education. The RNs, as part of a multidisciplinary team, educated HF patients on signs and symptoms of HF as well as on how to manage the disease. Patients completed, the Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire (KCCQ) to assess quality of life and the Self Care Heart Failure Index (SCHFI) to assess knowledge of HF and self-management skills.

These questionnaires were completed initially and at 30 and 60 day intervals. The RNs self-assessment of their knowledge and ability to educate patients increased in all areas. The patient’s KCCQ and SCHFI score improved at 30 days and 60 days when compared to their initial score. Larger EBPs are needed over a longer period of time to assess the impact on hospital readmissions and same day clinic visits for HF exhibitions.

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  • 2020-05-05

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Heart Failure Anticoagulation Teach-Back Education and Readmissions

Description

Heart failure affects millions of Americans each year. Treatment of advanced heart failure with reduced ejection fraction and left ventricular failure is sometimes treated with implantation of a left-ventricular assist

Heart failure affects millions of Americans each year. Treatment of advanced heart failure with reduced ejection fraction and left ventricular failure is sometimes treated with implantation of a left-ventricular assist device. While living with this life-sustaining machine, anticoagulation with Coumadin is necessary. Many of these patients are readmitted within 30-days of being discharged for pump clots, gastro-intestinal bleeds and even strokes. Patients are often discharged without adequate education on Coumadin management, which promotes inadequate self-care and medication non-adherence.

In current practice, healthcare providers lecture information in a quick manner without the evaluation of patients’ comprehension. Research suggests implementing the teach-back method during education sessions to assess for comprehension of material to improve medication adherence. Healthcare providers should implement Coumadin teach-back education to heart failure patients with left-ventricular assist devices to improve quality of life, increase medication adherence and decrease 30-day hospital readmission rates.

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Date Created
  • 2020-04-25

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Advanced Practice Registered Nurse Led Transitional Care Program in an Accountable Care Organization

Description

Purpose: Reduce or prevent readmissions among heart failure (HF) patients and increase quality of life (QOL), self-care behavior (SCB) and satisfaction through an advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) led transitional

Purpose: Reduce or prevent readmissions among heart failure (HF) patients and increase quality of life (QOL), self-care behavior (SCB) and satisfaction through an advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) led transitional care program (TCP) in collaboration with an Accountable Care Organization (ACO).

Background: Hospital readmissions place a heavy financial burden on patients, families, and health care systems. Readmissions can be reduced or prevented by providing a safe transition through care coordination and enhanced communication. Research demonstrates implementation of APRN led home visits (HV) along with telephonic follow-up are cost effective and can be utilized for reducing readmissions among HF patients.

Methods: A program was designed with an ACO and carried out in a family practice clinic with a group of seven HF patients older than 50 years who were at risk of readmission. Interventions included weekly HV with supplemental telephonic calls by the APRN student along with a physician assistant for 12 weeks. Readmission data was collected. QOL and SCB were measured using “Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire” (MLHFQ) and “European Heart Failure Self-Care Behavior Scale” respectively. Data was analyzed using descriptive statistics and the Friedman Test.

Outcomes: There were no hospital readmissions at 30 days and the interventions demonstrated a positive effect on QOL, self-care management and satisfaction (χ2 = 30.35, p=.000). The intervention had a large effect on the outcome variables resulting in an increase in QOL and SCB scores post-intervention (ES= -1.4 and -2 respectively).

Conclusions: TCP designed with an ACO, carried out in a primary care setting has a positive effect on reducing hospital readmissions and improving QOL, SCBs, and patient satisfaction among HF patients. TCPs are not revenue generating at outset due to reimbursement issues, however future considerations of a multidisciplinary team approach with convenient workflow may be explored for long-term feasibility and sustainability.

Funding Source: American Association of Colleges of Nursing and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention with support of the Academic Partners to Improve Health.

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Created

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  • 2017-05-02

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Effects of an Education Presentation for Hospital Providers on Heart Failure and Core Measures

Description

Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of providing education on current heart failure (HF) guidelines and core measures documentation (CMD) for healthcare providers to improve implementation of HF guidelines.

Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of providing education on current heart failure (HF) guidelines and core measures documentation (CMD) for healthcare providers to improve implementation of HF guidelines.

Background and Significance: HF affects over 5.1 million people in the United States, costing $31 billion a year; $1.7 billion spent on Medicare readmissions within 30 days of discharge. Guidelines and care coordination prevent expenses related to hospital readmissions and improve quality of life for adults with HF.

Methods: Healthcare providers (HCPs) at a metropolitan hospital participated in an education session reviewing HF treatment and CMD. Thirty participants completed the single five-point Likert scale pre/post surveys evaluating their opinions of knowledge and behaviors toward implementation of guidelines and CMD. Patient outcome data was abstracted measuring pre/post education compliance for ejection fraction, ACE/ARB, beta-blocker, HF education, follow-up appointments, aldosterone antagonist, anticoagulation, hydralazine nitrate, and CMD 30-45 day’s pre/post education. Analyses included descriptive statistics of participants and pre/post surveys using a paired t-test. Percentage of compliance for quality measures was completed on patients from September through December.

Results: Providers post intervention showed improved knowledge and behaviors toward implementation of guidelines and CMD, including reconciliation of medications to statistical significance. However, the demographics showed the majority of participants were non-cardiac specialties. Improved compliance for outcome data of quality measures was insignificant over time. The non-cardiac demographic may have contributed to this result.

Conclusion: The surveys did not correlate with the patient outcome data. Recommendations would include targeting cardiac focused HCPs for future education sessions.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-04-28

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Evaluating the Effect of a Heart Failure Cardiac Rehabilitation Intervention on Hospital Readmission Rates

Description

Heart failure (HF) is one of the most common and costly conditions for hospital readmissions in the United States (Conway, 2015). Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programs are effective in decreasing hospital

Heart failure (HF) is one of the most common and costly conditions for hospital readmissions in the United States (Conway, 2015). Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programs are effective in decreasing hospital readmission rates (Koukoui, Desmoulin, Lairy, Bleinc, Boursiquot, Galinier, & Koukoui, 2015). Medicare has established new requirements for qualification into a CR program; thus, patients are at risk for readmission in the six-weeks post discharge. To reduce HF hospital readmissions and to increase enrollment into the HF program, an infrastructure was implemented beginning in January 2016. This quality improvement project employed a patient chart audit reviewing overall hospital readmission rates for HF at a large hospital in Arizona.

A comparison of readmission rates was made between the 6 months prior to, and the 6-months after the expanded utilization of the HF program. An independent-samples t test was calculated comparing the mean score of the readmission rates before and after a HF CR intervention. No significant difference was found (t(358) = .721, p > .05). The mean of the group before the intervention (m =.15, sd = .36) was not significantly different from mean in the intervention group (m = .13, sd = .33). Implications for practice cannot completely be concluded from this project findings. Continued studies focusing on the enrollment, attendance, and completion of the HF CR program could assist in determining the benefits of referring all patients with the diagnosis of HF to the HF CR program.

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Date Created
  • 2017-05-01

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Feasibility Study of the Health Empowerment Intervention to Evaluate the Effect on Self-Management, Functional Health, and Well-Being in Older Adults with Heart Failure

Description

ABSTRACT

The population of older adults in the United States is growing disproportionately, with corresponding medical, social and economic implications. The number of Americans 65 years and older constitutes 13.7% of

ABSTRACT

The population of older adults in the United States is growing disproportionately, with corresponding medical, social and economic implications. The number of Americans 65 years and older constitutes 13.7% of the U.S. population, and is expected to grow to 21% by 2040. As the adults age, they are at risk for developing chronic illness and disability. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 5.7 million Americans have heart failure, and almost 80% of these are 65 years and older. The prevalence of heart failure will increase with the increase in aging population, thus increasing the costs associated with heart failure from 34.7 billion dollars in 2010 to 77.7 billion dollars by 2020. Of all cardiovascular hospitalizations, 28.9% are due to heart failure, and almost 60,000 deaths are accounted for heart failure. Marked disparities in heart failure persist within and between population subgroups. Living with heart failure is challenging for older adults, because being a chronic condition, the responsibility of day to day management of heart failure principally rests with patient. Approaches to improve self-management are targeted at adherence, compliance, and physiologic variables, little attention has been paid to personal and social contextual resources of older adults, crucial for decision making, and purposeful participation in goal attainment, representing a critical area for intervention. Several strategies based on empowerment perspective are focused on outcomes; paying less attention to the process. To address these gaps between research and practice, this feasibility study was guided by a tested theory, the Theory of Health Empowerment, to optimize self-management, functional health and well-being in older adults with heart failure. The study sample included older adults with heart failure attending senior centers. Specific aims of this feasibility study were to: (a) examine the feasibility of the Health Empowerment Intervention in older adults with heart failure, (b) evaluate the effect of the health empowerment intervention on self-management, functional health, and well-being among older adults with heart failure. The Health Empowerment Intervention was delivered focusing on strategies to identify and building upon self-capacity, and supportive social network, informed decision making and goal setting, and purposefully participating in the attainment of personal health goals for well-being. Study was feasible and significantly increased personal growth, and purposeful participation in the attainment of personal health goals.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017

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Posture, mobility, and 30-day hospital readmission in older adults with heart failure

Description

Background: Heart failure is the leading cause of hospitalization in older adults and has the highest 30-day readmission rate of all diagnoses. An estimated 30 to 60 percent of older

Background: Heart failure is the leading cause of hospitalization in older adults and has the highest 30-day readmission rate of all diagnoses. An estimated 30 to 60 percent of older adults lose some degree of physical function in the course of an acute hospital stay. Few studies have addressed the role of posture and mobility in contributing to, or improving, physical function in older hospitalized adults. No study to date that we are aware of has addressed this in the older heart failure population.

Purpose: To investigate the predictive value of mobility during a hospital stay and patterns of mobility during the month following discharge on hospital readmission and 30-day changes in functional status in older heart failure patients.

Methods: This was a prospective observational study of 21 older (ages 60+) patients admitted with a primary diagnosis of heart failure. Patients wore two inclinometric accelerometers (rib area and thigh) to record posture and an accelerometer placed at the ankle to record ambulatory activity. Patients wore all sensors continuously during hospitalization and the ankle accelerometer for 30 days after hospital discharge. Function was assessed in all patients the day after hospital discharge and again at 30 days post-discharge.

Results: Five patients (23.8%) were readmitted within the 30 day post-discharge period. None of the hospital or post-discharge mobility measures were associated with readmission after adjustment for covariates. Higher percent lying time in the hospital was associated with slower Timed Up and Go (TUG) time (b = .08, p = .01) and poorer hand grip strength (b = -13.94, p = .02) at 30 days post-discharge. Higher daily stepping activity during the 30 day post-discharge period was marginally associated with improvements in SPPB scores at 30 days (b = <.001, p = .06).

Conclusion: For older heart failure patients, increased time lying while hospitalized is associated with slower walking time and poor hand grip strength 30 days after discharge. Higher daily stepping after discharge may be associated with improvements in physical function at 30 days.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015

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Harm during hospitalizations for heart failure: adverse events as a reliability measure of hospital policies and procedures

Description

For more than twenty years, clinical researchers have been publishing data regarding incidence and risk of adverse events (AEs) incurred during hospitalizations. Hospitals have standard operating policies and procedures (SOPP)

For more than twenty years, clinical researchers have been publishing data regarding incidence and risk of adverse events (AEs) incurred during hospitalizations. Hospitals have standard operating policies and procedures (SOPP) to protect patients from AE. The AE specifics (rates, SOPP failures, timing and risk factors) during heart failure (HF) hospitalizations are unknown. There were 1,722 patients discharged with a primary diagnosis of HF from an academic hospital between January 2005 and December 2007. Three hundred eighty-one patients experienced 566 AEs, classified into four categories: medication (43.9%), infection (18.9%), patient care (26.3%), or procedural (10.9%). Three distinct analyses were performed: 1) patient's perspective of SOPP reliability including cumulative distribution and hazard functions of time to AEs; 2) Cox proportional hazards model to determine independent patient-specific risk factors for AEs; and 3) hospital administration's perspective of SOPP reliability through three years of the study including cumulative distribution and hazard functions of time between AEs and moving range statistical process control (SPC) charts for days between failures of each type. This is the first study, to our knowledge, to consider reliability of SOPP from both the patient's and hospital administration's perspective. AE rates in hospitalized patients are similar to other recently published reports and did not improve during the study period. Operations research methodologies will be necessary to improve reliability of care delivered to hospitalized patients.

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Date Created
  • 2012

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Effects of a novel, high-intensity aerobic interval training program on diastolic and cardiovascular function in patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction

Description

Heart failure is a major worldwide health concern and is the leading cause of hospitalization among elderly Americans. Approximately 50% of those diagnosed with heart failure have heart failure with

Heart failure is a major worldwide health concern and is the leading cause of hospitalization among elderly Americans. Approximately 50% of those diagnosed with heart failure have heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF). HFPEF presents a therapeutic dilemma because pharmacological strategies that are effective for the treatment of heart failure and reduced ejection fraction have failed to show benefit in HFPEF. Long term moderate intensity exercise programs have been shown to improve diastolic function in patients HFPEF. High intensity interval training (HIIT) has been shown to improve diastolic function in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction. However, the effects of high intensity interval training in patients with HFPEF are unknown. Fourteen patients with HFPEF were randomized to either: (1) a novel program of high-intensity aerobic interval training (n = 8), or (2) a commonly prescribed program of moderate-intensity (MOD) aerobic exercise training (n = 6). Before and after four weeks of exercise training, patients underwent a treadmill graded exercise test for the determination of peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak), a brachial artery reactivity test for assessment of endothelium-dependent flow-mediated dilation (BAFMD), aortic pulse wave velocity assessment as an index of vascular stiffness and two-dimensional echocardiography for assessment of left ventricular diastolic and systolic function. I hypothesized that (1) high-intensity aerobic interval training would result in superior improvements in FMD, aortic pulse wave velocity, VO2peak, diastolic function and, (2) changes in these parameters would be correlated with changes in VO2peak. The principal findings of the study were that a one month long high intensity interval training program resulted in significant improvements in diastolic function as measured by two-dimensional echocardiography [pre diastolic dysfunction (DD) grade - 2.13 + 0.4 vs. post DD grade - 1.25 + 0.7, p = 0.03]. The left atrial volume index was reduced in the HIIT group compared to MOD ( - 4.4 + 6.2 ml/m2 vs. 5.8 + 10.7 ml/m2, p = 0.02). Early mitral flow (E) improved in the HIIT group (pre - 0.93 + 0.2 m/s vs. post - 0.78 + 0.3 m/s, p = 0.03). A significant inverse correlation was observed between change in BAFMD and change in diastolic dysfunction grade (r = - 0.585, p = 0.028) when all the data were pooled. HIIT appears to be a time-efficient and safe strategy for improving diastolic function in patients with heart failure and preserved ejection fraction. These data may have implications for cardiovascular risk reduction in this population.

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  • 2012