Matching Items (8)

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I'm not that old: how attitudes towards loss of hearing affect adoption of goods and services designed to improve qualifty of life

Description

It is well understood that many people who experience hearing loss do not realize the extent of their loss and often do not seek help. This resistance to intervention puts

It is well understood that many people who experience hearing loss do not realize the extent of their loss and often do not seek help. This resistance to intervention puts them at risk of social isolation, depression and even serious neurological issues such as dementia.

This research explores first, the attitudes that people have toward hearing loss and how these attitudes affect the adoption of products and services that could help them. This may not seem like a design question, but it is paramount to designers who seek to improve the quality of life for this population. It is no longer enough to create beautiful, functional products. In order to make a difference in people’s lives, designers need to understand the underlying motivations that drive behavior. This informs the second question this study seeks to answer, what changes can be made to current products and services on the market in order to increase adoption.

Through a series of qualitative interviews with seniors experiencing hearing loss, this study finds that the main factors in their attitudes towards hearing loss are their feelings towards aging in general, their susceptibility to stigma, and their perceptions of the cost and functionality of the hearing devices available. However, the most important factor found in this study is a lack of awareness. Awareness of their own level of hearing loss. Awareness of the risks associated with putting off intervention. And awareness of the products and services available to help. Thus, design solutions that focus on visibility of services and patient education will have the most meaningful impact on quality of life for those who suffer from hearing loss.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019

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The effects of assisted cycle therapy on executive and motor functioning in older adults

Description

This study examines cognitive and motor function in typical older adults following acute exercise. Ten older adults (Mage = 65.1) completed a single session of assisted cycling (AC) (i.e., exercise

This study examines cognitive and motor function in typical older adults following acute exercise. Ten older adults (Mage = 65.1) completed a single session of assisted cycling (AC) (i.e., exercise accomplished through the use of a motor), voluntary cycling (VC) (self-selected cadence), and a no cycling (NC) control group. These sessions were randomized and separated by approximately one week. Both ACT and VC groups rode a stationary bicycle for 30-minutes each session. These sessions were separated by at least two days. Participants completed cognitive testing that assessed information processing and set shifting and motor testing including gross and fine motor performance at the beginning and at the end of each session. Consistent with our hypothesis concerning manual dexterity, the results showed that manual dexterity improved following the ACT session more than the VC or NC sessions. Improvements in set shifting were also found for the ACT session but not for the VC or NC sessions. The results are interpreted with respect to improvements in neurological function in older adults following acute cycling exercise. These improvements are balance, manual dexterity, and set shifting which have a positive effects on activities of daily living; such as, decrease risk of falls, improve movements like eating and handwriting, and increase ability to multitask.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015

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Getting older and getting colder: the impacts of temperature on health and comfort

Description

Research has demonstrated that temperature and relative humidity substantially influence overall perceptions of indoor air quality (Fang, Clausen, & Fanger, 1998). This finding places temperature quality as a high priority,

Research has demonstrated that temperature and relative humidity substantially influence overall perceptions of indoor air quality (Fang, Clausen, & Fanger, 1998). This finding places temperature quality as a high priority, especially for vulnerable adults over 60. Temperature extremes and fluctuation, as well as the perception of those conditions, affect physical performance, thermal comfort and health of older adults (Chatonnet & Cabanac, 1965, pp. 185-6; Fumiharu, Watanabe, Park, Shephard, & Aoyagi, 2005; Heijs & Stringer, 1988). The American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) have developed thermal-comfort standards for working-age, healthy individuals. None of these standards address the physiological and psychological needs of older adults (ASHRAE Standard 55, 2010; ISO-7730, 2005). This dissertation investigates the impacts of thermal conditions on self-reported health and perceived comfort for older adults, hypothesizing that warmer and more-table indoor thermal conditions will increase the health and perceived comfort of these adults. To this end, a new set of thermal comfort metrics was designed and tested to address the thermal preferences of older adults. The SENIOR COMFORT Metrics 2013 outlined new thresholds for optimal indoor high and low temperatures and set limits on thermal variability over time based on the ASHRAE-55 2010 model. This study was conducted at Sunnyslope Manor, a multi-unit, public-housing complex in the North Phoenix. Nearly 60% (76 of 118) of the residents (aged 62-82) were interviewed using a 110-question, self-reporting survey in 73 apartment units. A total of 40 questions and 20 sub-questions addressing perceptions of comfort, pain, sleep patterns, injuries, and mood were extracted from this larger health condition survey to assess health and thermal comfort. Indoor environmental thermal measurements included temperature in three locations: kitchen, living area, and bedroom and data were recorded every 15 minutes over 5 full days and 448 points. Study results start to indicate that older adults for Sunnyslope Manor preferred temperatures between 76 and 82.5 degrees Fahrenheit and that lower temperatures as outlined by ASHRAE-55 2010 increases the rate of injuries and mood changes in older adults among other findings.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013

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Driving and elderly primes in a simulated driving environment

Description

ABSTRACT Research studies have demonstrated that stereotypes can elicit a priming response. An experiment was conducted to test the effects of priming elderly and young stereotypes on driving behavior. Participants

ABSTRACT Research studies have demonstrated that stereotypes can elicit a priming response. An experiment was conducted to test the effects of priming elderly and young stereotypes on driving behavior. Participants drove in a driving simulator while navigating through two driving routes. Participants were guided by a neutral voice similar to "Siri" that informed them where to turn. Each route primed the participants with names that were deemed "old" or "young" as determined by a survey. The experiment yielded slower driving speeds in the elderly condition than in the young consistent with previous research regarding elderly stereotypes (Bargh et al, 1996; Branaghan and Gray, 2010; Taylor, 2010; Foster, 2012). These findings extend research on priming and behaviors elicited by participants in a simulated driving environment.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014

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Effects of elderly priming on driving speeds: a driving simulator study

Description

Research on priming has shown that a stimulus can cause people to behave according to the stereotype held about the stimulus. Two experiments were conducted in which the effects of

Research on priming has shown that a stimulus can cause people to behave according to the stereotype held about the stimulus. Two experiments were conducted in which the effects of elderly priming were tested by use of a driving simulator. In both experiments, participants drove through a simulated world guided by either an elderly or a younger female voice. The voices told the participants where to make each of six turns. Both experiments yielded slower driving speeds in the elderly voice condition. The effect was universal regardless of implicit and explicit attitudes towards elderly people.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2012

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Real world strategies for user centered approach to functional assessment and design of age-in-place support for older adults

Description

As people age, the desire to grow old independently and in place becomes larger and takes greater importance in their lives. Successful aging involves the physical, mental and social well-being

As people age, the desire to grow old independently and in place becomes larger and takes greater importance in their lives. Successful aging involves the physical, mental and social well-being of an individual. To enable successful aging of older adults, it is necessary for them to perform both activities of daily living (ADL) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL). Embedded assessment has made it possible to assess an individual's functional ability in-place, however the success of any technology depends largely on the user than the technology itself. Previous researches in in-situ functional assessment systems have heavily focused on the technology rather than on the user. This dissertation takes a user-centric approach to this problem by trying to identify the design and technical challenges of deploying and using a functional assessment system in the real world.

To investigate this line of research, a case study was conducted with 4 older adults in their homes, interviews were conducted with 8 caregivers and a controlled lab experiment was conducted with 8 young healthy adults at ASU, to test the sensors. This methodology provides a significant opportunity to advance the scientific field by expanding the present focus on IADL task performance to an integrated assessment of ADL and IADL task performance. Doing so would not only be more effective in identifying functional decline but could also provide a more comprehensive assessment of individuals' functional abilities with independence and also providing the caregivers with much needed respite.

The controlled lab study tested the sensors embedded into daily objects and found them to be reliable, and efficient. Short term exploratory case studies with healthy older adults revealed the challenges associated with design and technical aspects of the current system, while inductive analysis performed on interviews with caregivers helped to generate central themes on which future functional assessment systems need to be designed and built. The key central themes were a) focus on design / user experience, b) consider user's characteristics, personality, behavior and functional ability, c) provide support for independence, and d) adapt to individual user's needs.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015

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A statistical clinical decision support tool for determining thresholds in remote monitoring using predictive analytics

Description

Statistical process control (SPC) and predictive analytics have been used in industrial manufacturing and design, but up until now have not been applied to threshold data of vital sign monitoring

Statistical process control (SPC) and predictive analytics have been used in industrial manufacturing and design, but up until now have not been applied to threshold data of vital sign monitoring in remote care settings. In this study of 20 elders with COPD and/or CHF, extended months of peak flow monitoring (FEV1) using telemedicine are examined to determine when an earlier or later clinical intervention may have been advised. This study demonstrated that SPC may bring less than a 2.0% increase in clinician workload while providing more robust statistically-derived thresholds than clinician-derived thresholds. Using a random K-fold model, FEV1 output was predictably validated to .80 Generalized R-square, demonstrating the adequate learning of a threshold classifier. Disease severity also impacted the model. Forecasting future FEV1 data points is possible with a complex ARIMA (45, 0, 49), but variation and sources of error require tight control. Validation was above average and encouraging for clinician acceptance. These statistical algorithms provide for the patient's own data to drive reduction in variability and, potentially increase clinician efficiency, improve patient outcome, and cost burden to the health care ecosystem.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013

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The influence of religiosity on psychological well-being and life satisfaction in an elderly population

Description

ABSTRACT The major hypothesis tested in this research is that the psychological well-being and life satisfaction of elderly adult individuals can be predicted from religiosity (organizational and non-organizational religious beliefs

ABSTRACT The major hypothesis tested in this research is that the psychological well-being and life satisfaction of elderly adult individuals can be predicted from religiosity (organizational and non-organizational religious beliefs and behaviors). The sample consisted of 142 adults between the ages of 65-90, with the majority in the 65-70 age group (48%) (SD = 1.176). The entire sample resides in the state of Arizona, in both urban and rural communities. Participants were administered a questionnaire which requested demographic information, and three instruments: the Duke University Religion Index (the DUREL), and the Affect Balance Scale and the Life Satisfaction Index - Z (LSIZ). Correlational and Multiple regression analyses were used to examine the relation between these adults' psychological well-being, life satisfaction and their religiosity. Independent t-tests were also used to examine possible sex, ethnic and religiosity effects on psychological well-being and life satisfaction. Findings revealed that psychological well-being and life satisfaction are higher when religiosity is higher, regardless of sex or ethnicity. These findings are consistent with those of previous research in this field.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2012