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A Water Safety Education Program for Primary Care Providers

Description

Purpose/Aims: We aim to increase understanding of water safety measures among primary care providers and improve the quality and efficiency of parent water-safety education.

Background and Significance: Drownings are the

Purpose/Aims: We aim to increase understanding of water safety measures among primary care providers and improve the quality and efficiency of parent water-safety education.

Background and Significance: Drownings are the leading cause of death in one to four year old children in the United States. Arizona’s drowning rate is nearly double the national average for this age group. Water safety is an important anticipatory guidance topic a primary care provider should be discussing at all well visits. The Health Belief Model is an effective framework to guide family education interventions. It is strongly encouraged that providers incorporate water safety education into the developmental milestone discussions.

Methods: Ten providers recruited from six Arizona pediatric primary care clinics participated in an educational one-hour session. Providers were encouraged to prioritize water safety discussions within the one to four year old age group and deliver education in the context of individual child development. Additionally, providers were updated on water safety recommendations from the Center for Family Health and Safety at Phoenix Children’s Hospital. Supplemental handouts with developmental water safety information were given to each office to aid providers in parent education. A pre-survey was administered to the providers prior to the education session and a post-survey was given at an eight-week follow up. The surveys measured provider perception and current practices of water safety education and utilized a Likert scale to compare data sets. Current and retrospective chart reviews were conducted to evaluate sustainability of the educational intervention.

Outcomes/Results: Sixty percent of provider participants were Medical Doctors (MD) and 40% were Nurse Practitioners (NP) with experience ranging from one year to over 20 years. Following the education session, providers were more likely to discuss keeping a child at arms-reach at all times (p=0.046) during their well visits. There was also an increase in providers incorporating water safety discussions into milestone education (p=0.054).

Conclusion: This educational intervention empowered providers to deliver water safety education in the context of normal developmental milestones at each one to four year old well visit. The anticipatory guidance emphasizes to parents that the behaviors their children exhibit are healthy and normal, but also explains how achieving these milestones put their children at greater risk for drownings. This quality improvement project is part of a larger initiative to decrease the number of drownings in Arizona through education and policy

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-04-29

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Tailored Messaging Feedback to Improve Parent Knowledge and Behavior Practices on Pediatric Drowning Prevention

Description

Introduction and Background: Drowning is the leading cause of preventable injury death in Arizona for children under five years old. Tailored education has demonstrated efficacy in behavior change and knowledge

Introduction and Background: Drowning is the leading cause of preventable injury death in Arizona for children under five years old. Tailored education has demonstrated efficacy in behavior change and knowledge retention. The purpose of this evidence-based project was to evaluate if tailored education improved knowledge and self-reported behaviors related to pediatric drowning. The Elaboration Likelihood Model provided the framework for this project.

Methods/Experimental Approach: The prospective pilot project was conducted using the Iowa Model of Evidence Based Practice. Parents with children under five years, presenting with low acuity complaints in a pediatric emergency department were approached. A baseline assessment identified high-risk behaviors and a custom education plan was delivered to parents. Outcome variables were measured at baseline and three weeks after initial assessment.

Results: The average parent age was 29 (M = 28.5; SD = 6.35) years. Participant (n=29) responses were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Participants (n = 27, 93%) reported likelihood to change behaviors and 29 (100%) perceived the tailored intervention as relevant. Secondary outcome variables were not measured at three weeks due to a lack of survey response.

Conclusions: Parents reported a high likelihood of behavior change when water safety education was tailored and relevant to their child. The tailored intervention evoked positive interaction and receptivity from parents and suggested a high motivation to make a behavior change. The effect of the intervention could not be tested due to the lack of follow-up and post data collection. The design of this evidence-based project is quantifiable and replicable in a low-acuity setting, which allows for future evaluations of self-reported behavior change and knowledge improvement.

Funding: No sponsorship or financial conflict of interest.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05-01