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The Physiological and Psychological Effects of Swing Dancing Compared to Traditional Exercise

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Swing dancing is a form of partnered dancing that has a focus on social interactions. The purpose of this study is to determine how social factors and intrinsic motivation effect how college age students perceive how much energy exertion swing

Swing dancing is a form of partnered dancing that has a focus on social interactions. The purpose of this study is to determine how social factors and intrinsic motivation effect how college age students perceive how much energy exertion swing dancing requires compared to traditional exercise. 20 ASU students were split into 10 female-male couples. The participants first completed a 30-minute session of social dancing and then a week later completed a 30-minute session of cycling on a stationary bike. Physiological data was collected using a Polar heart rate (HR) monitor wristwatch and chest strap. The HR of participants was taken after a period of rest and every five minutes during swing dancing and cycling. The rate of perceived exertion (RPE) was measured based on a Borg scale (6-20). RPE was taken after a period of rest and every five minutes during swing dancing and cycling. After both physiological sessions a psychological survey was distributed measuring the social factors of dancing, the intrinsic motivation of dancing, and the intrinsic motivation of traditional exercise. There was no significant difference between average HR during rest (p=0.34) or during the two types of exercises (p=0.26). There also was no significant difference in RPE during rest (p=0.33) or during the two types of exercises (p=0.46). At the same intensity participants perceived swing dancing to require as much energy exertion as cycling. Participants were significantly more intrinsically motivated to swing dance compared to traditional exercise. Participants reported high levels of social factors while swing dancing and these social factors had a moderately positive effect on intrinsic motivation for swing dancing. People are more intrinsically motivated to engage in swing dancing over traditional exercise and this may be due to the high social factors found in partnered dancing. Swing dancing is a form of exercise that can be used to reach the recommended level of physical activity.

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Date Created
2019-05

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The Effect of Exercise Therapy on Cognitive Function in Adolescents with Down Syndrome

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This study examines the effect of exercise therapy on a stationary bike on cognitive function, specifically inhibition and set-switching, in adolescents with Down syndrome. 44 participants were randomly divided between the voluntary cycling therapy group (VCT) (i.e., self-selected cadence), assisted

This study examines the effect of exercise therapy on a stationary bike on cognitive function, specifically inhibition and set-switching, in adolescents with Down syndrome. 44 participants were randomly divided between the voluntary cycling therapy group (VCT) (i.e., self-selected cadence), assisted cycling therapy group (ACT) (i.e., 30% faster than self-selected cadence accomplished by a motor), and a control group (NC) in which the participants did not undergo any exercise therapy. Both cycling groups rode a stationary bicycle, for 30 minutes, three times a week, for eight-weeks. At the beginning (i.e., pretest) and end (i.e., posttest) of the eight-week session the participants completed tasks to evaluate their cognitive function. They completed three trials of the card sort test (i.e., set-switching) and three trials of the knock-tap test (i.e, inhibition) before and after eight-weeks of cycling therapy. The scores of these tests were analyzed using one-way ANOVA between groups and paired samples t-tests. The results showed that after eight-weeks of cycling therapy the participants in the VCT group performed worse in the knock-tap test, but improved in two trials of the card sort test. The results also showed that the participants in the ACT group performed worse after eight-weeks of exercise therapy in one trial of the card sort test. No significant changes were seen for the control group. Due to the fact that on average the participants in the VCT group cycled with a higher heart rate, our results suggest exercise that significantly elevates heart rate can improve cognitive function, specifically set-switching, in adolescents with Down syndrome.

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Date Created
2015-05

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The Effects of Physical Activity Prescriptions on Psychological Outcomes

Description

Research on the correlation between exercise and mental health outcomes has been a growing field for the past few decades. It is of specific interest to look at how physical activity affects psychological outcomes and it’s efficacy for treating

Research on the correlation between exercise and mental health outcomes has been a growing field for the past few decades. It is of specific interest to look at how physical activity affects psychological outcomes and it’s efficacy for treating mental health disorders. The current treatment options for depression and anxiety are not suitable for everyone and therefore there is a need for a more accessible and cost-effective form of treatment, like exercise. Furthermore, exercise as a treatment is also linked with many more health benefits. Indeed a wealth of studies have explored the relationships between exercise and depression as well as exercise and anxiety, showing exercise to be a positive predictor of mental health. The following paper will serve to: define depressive and anxiety disorders, explore the research on the effects of physical activity prescriptions on the outcomes of such disorders, create evidence-based applied recommendations for different disorders, and explore the mechanisms by which exercise mitigates symptoms to ultimately accredit the prescription of exercise as a form of treatment for mental health disorders.

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Created

Date Created
2020-05

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Barriers to Physical Activity for the Adult Transgender Population

Description

Exercise has many physical and mental health benefits, but there are several common barriers to physical activity that the general population faces. Furthermore, it has been shown that transgender individuals do not participate in physical activity as much as nontransgender

Exercise has many physical and mental health benefits, but there are several common barriers to physical activity that the general population faces. Furthermore, it has been shown that transgender individuals do not participate in physical activity as much as nontransgender individuals do. This suggests that the transgender population may face additional or unique barriers to physical activity. The purpose of this study was to further examine and identify these barriers for adult transgender individuals regardless of whether they decided to, were in the process of, or completed medical transition. Five categories of physical activity barriers were analyzed within a survey: time, motivation, accessibility, emotions, and social factors. This online physical activity questionnaire was distributed to transgender adults 18 years or older over a course of two months. Twelve responses were received but only nine of those met the inclusion criteria and were used in the study (n=9). Three questions were asked for each barrier category and were formatted as a Likert scale. Each question and barrier category was given a score based on if the responses indicated that particular instance as a barrier to physical activity or not. The results of the survey responses showed that social factors was the highest reported barrier to physical activity for transgender adults. Emotions was the second highest reported barrier, while accessibility was the lowest reported barrier. The responses from this study indicate that transgender adults do experience different or additional barriers to physical activity when compared to the general population.

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Date Created
2020-12

Barriers to Physical Activity for the Adult Transgender Population

Description

Exercise has many physical and mental health benefits, but there are several common barriers to
physical activity that the general population faces. Furthermore, it has been shown that
transgender individuals do not participate in physical activity as much as nontransgender

Exercise has many physical and mental health benefits, but there are several common barriers to
physical activity that the general population faces. Furthermore, it has been shown that
transgender individuals do not participate in physical activity as much as nontransgender
individuals do. This suggests that the transgender population may face additional or unique
barriers to physical activity. The purpose of this study was to further examine and identify these
barriers for adult transgender individuals regardless of whether they decided to, were in the
process of, or completed medical transition. Five categories of physical activity barriers were
analyzed within a survey: time, motivation, accessibility, emotions, and social factors. This
online physical activity questionnaire was distributed to transgender adults 18 years or older over
a course of two months. Twelve responses were received but only nine of those met the inclusion
criteria and were used in the study (n=9). Three questions were asked for each barrier category
and were formatted as a Likert scale. Each question and barrier category was given a score based
on if the responses indicated that particular instance as a barrier to physical activity or not. The
results of the survey responses showed that social factors was the highest reported barrier to
physical activity for transgender adults. Emotions was the second highest reported barrier, while
accessibility was the lowest reported barrier. The responses from this study indicate that
transgender adults do experience different or additional barriers to physical activity when
compared to the general population.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2020-12

The Benefits of Exercise in Treating Anxiety and Depression

Description

Exercise has emerged as an effective way to treat anxiety and depression. This project first examines the early research on this topic so we can provide a historical context for the thesis. We then look into the contemporary context, where

Exercise has emerged as an effective way to treat anxiety and depression. This project first examines the early research on this topic so we can provide a historical context for the thesis. We then look into the contemporary context, where we can see how the topic is being talked about in modern forms of media. Finally, we apply the research to college students. At the end of the paper, you will find a brochure we made specifically for the college student struggling with anxiety or depression.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2022-05