Matching Items (3)

Filtering by

Clear all filters

132510-Thumbnail Image.png

Effects of Menthol on Weight Regain and Maintenance of Caloric Restriction: A Pilot Study

Description

The prevalence of excessive weight gain (obesity) has steadily increased since about 1980. Excessive weight gain is associated with many comorbidities; thus, a successful treatment is needed. The most common form of non-surgical treatment for excessive weight gain is caloric

The prevalence of excessive weight gain (obesity) has steadily increased since about 1980. Excessive weight gain is associated with many comorbidities; thus, a successful treatment is needed. The most common form of non-surgical treatment for excessive weight gain is caloric restriction with the intent to reduce body weight by 10%. Though this treatment is successful at reducing body weight, it often fails at maintaining the weight loss. Dietary menthol has been suggested as a possible treatment for excessive weight gain and has produced promising results as a preventative method for excessive weight gain. Our studies aimed at reducing weight regain and maintaining caloric restriction by feeding male Sprague-Dawley rats 0.5% dietary menthol during a period of caloric restriction, aimed at reducing their body weight by 10%, following an experimental period where the rats were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) or low-fat diet (LFD). The effects of the dietary menthol were observed during the weight regain period following the caloric restriction period. Two studies were conducted, and both were unable to achieve a maintenance of weight loss following caloric restriction, although our first study was able to produce a delay in weight regain and did not show any evidence of increased thermogenesis in menthol-treated rats. Our findings differ from the findings of previous studies on dietary menthol which could possibly be due to species effects, differences in procedures, age effects, or effects of different fatty acid compositions. The contrasting results in our studies could be due to genetic differences between litters used or a difference in manufacturing of the menthol diet between studies. Given the partial response to menthol in the first study, it can be suggested that the concentration of 0.5% may be below the threshold of menthol sensitivity for some rats. Future research should focus on increasing the concentration of dietary menthol from 0.5% to 1%, since the current concentration did not yield a reduction in weight regain or maintenance of caloric restriction.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2019-05

134744-Thumbnail Image.png

Diet-Induced Thermogenesis as Measured by Exogenous Norepinephrine Injections in High Fat Diet - Fed Rats: A Pilot Study

Description

It is presently believed that brown adipose tissue (BAT) is an important tissue in the control of obesity because it has the propensity to increase energy expenditure. The purpose of this study was to attempt to quantify the thermogenesis of

It is presently believed that brown adipose tissue (BAT) is an important tissue in the control of obesity because it has the propensity to increase energy expenditure. The purpose of this study was to attempt to quantify the thermogenesis of BAT when four rats were exposed to a progression of low-fat to high-fat diet. Exogenous norepinephrine (NE) injections (dose of 0.25 mg/kg i.p.) were administered in order to elicit a temperature response, where increases in temperature indicate increased activity. Temperatures were measured via temperature sensing transponders that had been inserted at the following three sites: interscapular BAT (iBAT), the abdomen (core), and lower back (reference). Data showed increased BAT activity during acute (2-3 weeks) high fat diet (HFD) in comparison to low fat diet (LFD), but a moderate to marked decrease in BAT activity during chronic HFD (6-8 weeks) when compared to acute HFD. This suggests that while a HFD may initially stimulate BAT in the short-term, a long-term HFD diet may have negative effects on BAT activation.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2016-12

152747-Thumbnail Image.png

The effects of omega 3 supplementation on markers of obesity and endothelial function in healthy subjects

Description

ABSTRACT The hormone leptin is an important regulator of body weight and energy balance, while nitric oxide (NO) produced in the blood vessels is beneficial for preventing disease-induced impaired vasodilation and hypertension. Elevations in the free radical superoxide can result

ABSTRACT The hormone leptin is an important regulator of body weight and energy balance, while nitric oxide (NO) produced in the blood vessels is beneficial for preventing disease-induced impaired vasodilation and hypertension. Elevations in the free radical superoxide can result in impaired vasodilation through scavenging of NO. Omega 3 is a polyunsaturated fatty acid that is beneficial at reducing body weight and in lowering many cardiovascular risk factors like atherosclerosis. The present study was designed to examine the change in plasma concentrations of leptin, nitric oxide, and the antioxidant superoxide dismutase in addition to examining the association between leptin and NO in healthy normal weight adult female subjects before and following omega 3 intakes. Participants were randomly assigned to either a fish oil group (600 mg per day) or a control group (1000 mg of coconut oil per day) for 8 weeks. Results showed no significant difference in the percent change of leptin over the 8 week supplementation period for either group (15.3±31.9 for fish oil group, 7.83±27 for control group; p=0.763). The percent change in NO was similarly not significantly altered in either group (-1.97±22 decline in fish oil group, 11.8±53.9 in control group; p=0.960). Likewise, the percent change in superoxide dismutase for each group was not significant following 8 weeks of supplementation (fish oil group: 11.94±20.94; control group: 11.8±53.9; p=0.362). The Pearson correlation co-efficient comparing the percent change of both leptin and NO was r2= -0.251 demonstrating a mildly negative, albeit insignificant, relationship between these factors. Together, these findings suggest that daily supplementation with 600 mg omega 3 in healthy females is not beneficial for improving these cardiovascular risk markers. Future studies in this area should include male subjects as well as overweight subjects with larger doses of fish oil that are equivalent to three or more servings per week. The importance of gender cannot be underestimated since estrogen has protective effects in the vasculature of females that may have masked any further protective effects of the fish oil. In addition, overweight individuals are often leptin-resistant and develop impaired vasodilation resulting from superoxide-mediated scavenging of nitric oxide. Therefore, the reported antioxidant and weight loss properties of omega 3 supplementation may greatly benefit overweight individuals.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2014