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Obesity and the Use of Brown Adipose Tissue as a Tool for Fat Loss in Obese Humans

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Obesity is now an epidemic in the United States and scientists must work to approach it from a unique angle. The focus of my thesis is the application of brown adipose tissue as a combatant for fat loss in the

Obesity is now an epidemic in the United States and scientists must work to approach it from a unique angle. The focus of my thesis is the application of brown adipose tissue as a combatant for fat loss in the body. Unused as adults, brown adipose tissue increases metabolism and mitochondrial function to burn more fat in individuals that cannot lose weight conventionally. Current research works to introduce safe hormonal pathways in the sympathetic nervous system to generate more of this tissue.

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2013-05

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The effect of high-intensity interval exercise on postprandial endothelial function in youth

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In adults, consuming a high-fat meal can induce endothelial dysfunction while exercise may mitigate postprandial endothelial dysfunction. Whether exercise is protective against postprandial endothelial dysfunction in obese youth is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine if high-intensity

In adults, consuming a high-fat meal can induce endothelial dysfunction while exercise may mitigate postprandial endothelial dysfunction. Whether exercise is protective against postprandial endothelial dysfunction in obese youth is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine if high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) performed the evening prior to a high-fat meal protects against postprandial endothelial dysfunction in obese adolescent males. Fourteen obese adolescent males (BMI%tile=98.5±0.6; 14.3±1.0yrs) completed the study. After initial screening, participants arrived, fasted at 9:00 in the morning where brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) was measured using duplex ultrasound after 20min of supine rest (7.0±3.0%) and completed a maximal exercise test on a cycle ergometer (VO2peak=2.6±0.5 L/min). Participants were randomized and completed 2 conditions: a morning high-fat meal challenge with evening prior HIIE (EX+M) or a morning high-fat meal challenge without prior exercise (MO). The EX+M condition included a single HIIE session on a cycle ergometer (8 X 2min at ≥90%HRmax, with 2min active recovery between bouts, 42min total) which was performed at 17:00 the evening prior to the meal challenge. In both conditions, a mixed-meal was tailored to participants body weight consisting of 0.7g of fat/kg of body weight consumed (889±95kcal; 65% Fat, 30% CHO). FMD was measured at fasting (>10hrs) and subsequently measured at 2hr and 4hr after high-fat meal consumption. Exercise did not improve fasting FMD (7.5±3.0 vs. 7.4±2.8%, P=0.927; EX+M and MO, respectively). Despite consuming a high-fat meal, FMD was not reduced at 2hr (8.4±3.4 vs. 7.6±3.9%; EX+M and MO, respectively) or 4hr (8.8±3.9 vs. 8.6±4.0%; EX+M and MO, respectively) in either condition and no differences were observed between condition (p(condition*time)=0.928). These observations remained after adjusting for baseline artery diameter and shear rate. We observed that HIIE, the evening prior, had no effect on fasting or postprandial endothelial function when compared with a meal only condition. Future research should examine whether exercise training may be able to improve postprandial endothelial function rather than a single acute bout in obese youth.

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2014

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Effects of eight weeks of high-intensity interval training on blood glucose control, endothelial function, and visceral fat in obese adults

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Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the number one cause of death in the United States and type 2 diabetes (T2D) and obesity lead to cardiovascular disease. Obese adults are more susceptible to CVD compared to their non-obese counterparts. Exercise training leads

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the number one cause of death in the United States and type 2 diabetes (T2D) and obesity lead to cardiovascular disease. Obese adults are more susceptible to CVD compared to their non-obese counterparts. Exercise training leads to large reductions in the risk of CVD and T2D. Recent evidence suggests high-intensity interval training (HIT) may yield similar or superior benefits in a shorter amount of time compared to traditional continuous exercise training. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of HIT to continuous (CONT) exercise training for the improvement of endothelial function, glucose control, and visceral adipose tissue. Seventeen obese men (N=9) and women (N=8) were randomized to eight weeks of either HIT (N=9, age=34 years, BMI=37.6 kg/m2) or CONT (N=8, age=34 years, BMI=34.6 kg/m2) exercise 3 days/week for 8 weeks. Endothelial function was assessed via flow-mediated dilation (FMD), glucose control was assessed via continuous glucose monitoring (CGM), and visceral adipose tissue and body composition was measured with an iDXA. Incremental exercise testing was performed at baseline, 4 weeks, and 8 weeks. There were no changes in weight, fat mass, or visceral adipose tissue measured by the iDXA, but there was a significant reduction in body fat that did not differ by group (46±6.3 to 45.4±6.6%, P=0.025). HIT led to a significantly greater improvement in FMD compared to CONT exercise (HIT: 5.1 to 9.0%; CONT: 5.0 to 2.6%, P=0.006). Average 24-hour glucose was not improved over the whole group and there were no group x time interactions for CGM data (HIT: 103.9 to 98.2 mg/dl; CONT: 99.9 to 100.2 mg/dl, P>0.05). When statistical analysis included only the subjects who started with an average glucose at baseline > 100 mg/dl, there was a significant improvement in glucose control overall, but no group x time interaction (107.8 to 94.2 mg/dl, P=0.027). Eight weeks of HIT led to superior improvements in endothelial function and similar improvements in glucose control in obese subjects at risk for T2D and CVD. HIT was shown to have comparable or superior health benefits in this obese sample with a 36% lower total exercise time commitment.

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Date Created
2013

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Effects of muscle contraction frequency on blood glucose control, insulin sensitivity, endothelial function and blood pressure among obese males

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Cardiovascular disease and diabetes are major health burdens. Diabetes is a primary risk factor of cardiovascular disease, and there is a strong link between obesity and risk of developing diabetes. With the prevalence of prediabetes highest among overweight/obese individuals, investigation

Cardiovascular disease and diabetes are major health burdens. Diabetes is a primary risk factor of cardiovascular disease, and there is a strong link between obesity and risk of developing diabetes. With the prevalence of prediabetes highest among overweight/obese individuals, investigation into preventative strategies are needed. Aerobic exercise is a potent stimulus for both insulin and non-insulin dependent glucose uptake into the skeletal muscle. A single exercise session can improve insulin sensitivity within hours after exercise. The effects of intensity, type, and volume of exercise on glucose homeostasis have been studied extensively; however, controlling for muscle contraction frequency with a constant exercise intensity and workload has not been examined. The purpose of this study was to compare muscle contraction frequency during aerobic exercise by altering cycling cadence on insulin sensitivity and vascular health. Eleven obese males (age=28yr, BMI=35kg/m2) completed three conditions in random order: 1) control-no exercise; 2) 45-min cycling at 45 revolutions per minute (45RPM) at 65-75%VO2max; 3) 45-min cycling at 90RPM at 65-75%VO2max. Glucose control and insulin sensitivity were assessed with oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT) 4 hours post-exercise. Vascular health was assessed via flow-mediated dilation (FMD) pre-exercise, 1-hr and 2-hr post exercise and ambulatory blood pressure was assessed pre-exercise, and continually every 15 min post-exercise. Linear mixed models were used to compare the mean differences in outcome variables. There were no significant differences found between control and both exercise conditions for all OGTT outcomes and no differences were found between control and exercise in FMD (all, p>0.05). Significant effects for exercise were found for both brachial and central blood pressure measures. Brachial systolic blood pressures were lower at 2- and 4-hr post-exercise by approximately -10 and -8mmHg, respectively (p<0.001 and p=0.004) versus control. Central systolic blood pressures were lower at 2-, 3-, and 4-hr post-exercise by approximately -8, -9 and -6mmHg, respectively (p<0.001, p=0.021 and p=0.004) versus control. In conclusion, aerobic exercise, regardless of muscle contraction frequency, were unable to effect glucose control and insulin sensitivity. Similarly, there was no effect on vascular function. However, there was a significant effect of aerobic exercise on reducing post-exercise blood pressure.

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Date Created
2017