Matching Items (86)

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Lifestyle Treatment Intervention in Obese Military Members

Description

Obesity is a significant national public health crisis, affecting one-third of American adults. It is a complex and multifactorial disease that increases the risk of multiple chronic medical conditions including

Obesity is a significant national public health crisis, affecting one-third of American adults. It is a complex and multifactorial disease that increases the risk of multiple chronic medical conditions including coronary heart disease, diabetes, and even leading to potential premature mortality. Moreover, increased health care utilization and escalating medical costs associated with obesity treatment are overwhelming an already burdened health care system. Obesity is nondiscriminatory, affecting individuals from various demographic and socioeconomic backgrounds, even extending to our unique population of active duty military service members and veterans.

Despite mandatory physical fitness and body composition requirements, active duty service members continue to experience an increasing prevalence of obesity. The obesity epidemic has considerable implications for military readiness, accession, and retention. Limited studies have examined weight-loss interventions including self-paced and provider-led interventions among active duty military service members with varying degrees of success. The purpose of this evidence based doctoral project was to examine the effectiveness of a twelve-week group lifestyle intervention involving education regarding healthy diet, physical activity and behavior change recommendations on weight and body mass index (BMI). The study demonstrated no significant differences in initial and post intervention weight and BMI.

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  • 2020-05-06

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Obesity in Adults on Antidepressant Therapy

Description

In the United States obesity continues to be a growing issue in the adult population, which is compounded by the fact that many people have had antidepressant therapy at some

In the United States obesity continues to be a growing issue in the adult population, which is compounded by the fact that many people have had antidepressant therapy at some point in their lives. Health problems such as metabolic syndrome, diabetes, skeleton/joint issues and more can stem from obesity. These comorbid health care problems can increase the costs at the state and federal levels. This paper will examine obesity and its relation to antidepressant therapy in depressed adults that are obese or endeavoring to avoid further weight gain. Research indicates that antidepressant therapies have shown a greater propensity towards weight gain, though few research studies show weight loss.

Intervention: 10 minutes of nutritional counseling during office visits. Setting: Family psychiatric clinic in the southwest of the United States.

Methods: Data collection process: Depressed adults on antidepressant therapies were randomly selected.

Instrumentation: Weight scale, National Literacy Scale, pamphlet (for teaching) and height scale. Data collected was at baseline, 4 weeks and 8 weeks.

Outcomes: 14 Participants agreed to the project, 10 completed to the 4-week mark and 4 finished the project to the 8-week mark. 10 female participants and 4 male participants. The remaining 4 participants showed 1.6% reduction in body mass index, which correlated with an increase in nutritional learning from baseline to 8-weeks.

Recommendations: Nutritional counseling is a non-pharmacological intervention for achieving and a desired weight, which has shown positive results in varying populations and clinical situations.

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  • 2020-05-07

A Pilot, Longitudinal Study of the Effect of a High Fat Diet Compared to a Chow Diet on the Energy Gap Between Energy Intake and Energy Expenditure

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This is a pilot study testing a new indirect calorimeter device. This project was designed to determine the effect of a high fat versus a standard chow diet and age

This is a pilot study testing a new indirect calorimeter device. This project was designed to determine the effect of a high fat versus a standard chow diet and age on the energy gap (the difference between energy intake and energy expenditure). Measurements of energy expenditure and oxygen consumption were obtained over a 23-hour period from a group of rats fed a high fat diet and a group of rats fed standard chow diet. The experiments were repeated during an experimental phase for 12 weeks, a phase of caloric restriction for 4 weeks, and a phase of weight regain for 4 weeks. We found energy expenditure and oxygen consumption to decrease in the caloric restriction phase and increase with excessive weight gain. Rats fed a high fat diet and obesity prone rats had a wider energy gap than rats fed a standard chow diet and obesity resistant rats. The caloric restriction phase closed the energy gap between energy expenditure and energy intake for all of the rats. The weight regain phase shifted the rats back into positive energy balance so that the energy intake was greater than the energy expenditure. The rats showed greater weight gain in the weight regain phase than in the experimental phase for all groups of rats. The indirect calorimeter device would require further testing to improve the accuracy of the measurements of respiratory quotient and carbon dioxide production before being used in future clinical research applications. The indirect calorimeter device has the potential to record respiratory quotient and carbon dioxide production.

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  • 2019-05

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TARGETING ADIPOSE TISSUE INFLAMMATION IN THE TREATMENT OF TYPE II DIABETES

Description

Diabesity is a global epidemic affecting millions worldwide. Diabesity is the term given to the link between obesity and Type II diabetes. It is estimated that ~90% of patients diagnosed

Diabesity is a global epidemic affecting millions worldwide. Diabesity is the term given to the link between obesity and Type II diabetes. It is estimated that ~90% of patients diagnosed with Type II diabetes are overweight or have struggled with excess body fat in the past. Type II diabetes is characterized by insulin resistance which is an impaired response of the body to insulin that leads to high blood glucose levels. Adipose tissue, previously thought of as an inert tissue, is now recognized as a major endocrine organ with an important role in the body's immune response and the development of chronic inflammation. It is speculated that adipose tissue inflammation is a major contributor to insulin resistance particular to Type II diabetes. This literature review explores the popular therapeutic targets and marketed drugs for the treatment of Type II diabetes and their role in decreasing adipose tissue inflammation. rAGE is currently in pre-clinical studies as a possible target to combat adipose tissue inflammation due to its relation to insulin resistance. Metformin and Pioglitazone are two drugs already being marketed that use unique chemical pathways to increase the production of insulin and/or decrease blood glucose levels. Sulfonylureas is one of the first FDA approved drugs used in the treatment of Type II diabetes, however, it has been discredited due to its life-threatening side effects. Bariatric surgery is a form of invasive surgery to rid the body of excess fat and has shown to normalize blood glucose levels. These treatments are all secondary to lifestyle changes, such as diet and exercise which can help halt the progression of Type II diabetes patients.

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  • 2019-05

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The Effects of Norepinephrine on Diet Induced Thermogenesis.

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Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is thought to be important in combating obesity as it can expend energy in the form of heat, e.g. thermogenesis. The goal of this study was

Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is thought to be important in combating obesity as it can expend energy in the form of heat, e.g. thermogenesis. The goal of this study was to study the effect of injected norepinephrine (NE) on the activation of BAT in rats that were fed a high fat diet (HFD). A dose of 0.25 mg/kg NE was used to elicit a temperature response that was measured using transponders inserted subcutaneously over the BAT and lower back and intraperitoneally to measure the core temperature. The results found that the thermic effect of the BAT increased after the transition from low fat diet to a high fat diet (LFD) yet, after prolonged exposure to the HFD, the effects resembled levels found with the LFD. This suggests that while a HFD may stimulate the effect of BAT, long term exposure may have adverse effects on BAT activity. This may be due to internal factors that will need to be examined further.

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  • 2017-05

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The Effects of a High-Fat Diet on Diet-Induced Thermogenesis in Cold-Stressed Rats: A Pilot Study

Description

Obesity is a rising problem in the country today, and countless efforts have been made to achieve long-term weight loss. Recent research indicates that through the manipulation of Brown Adipose

Obesity is a rising problem in the country today, and countless efforts have been made to achieve long-term weight loss. Recent research indicates that through the manipulation of Brown Adipose Tissue (BAT) activity within the body, weight loss can be achieved. The goal of this experiment was to understand the effects of a high-fat diet (HFD) on BAT activity and diet-induced thermogenesis in cold-stressed rats. It was predicted that the HFD would stimulate BAT activity and this would then drive up thermogenic activity to promote weight loss. Diet-induced thermogenesis was predicted to increase during the HFD phase of this experiment as the body would require more energy to digest the more calorically dense food. Upon arrival at six weeks of age, the rats were started on a low-fat diet (LFD) ad libitum for three weeks. They were then transitioned into a HFD ad libitum for the next 8 weeks. Throughout the experiment, the rats were maintained in a cold-stressed environment at 22°C. It was determined that one of the rats was identified as obesity prone, while the other three rats were obesity resistant based on the rate of weight gain and caloric intake. Obesity can decrease metabolism in the body for many reasons, yet it was not seen in this experiment that the obesity prone rat demonstrated decreased metabolism in comparison to the others. Based on the differences seen in the reference temperatures and the BAT temperatures, it was determined that the BAT was active throughout both the LFD and HFD phases. However, the BAT did not rise significantly during the HFD period as expected. More research is indicated with a larger sample size to determine if BAT activity does continue to increase during a HFD as a result of diet-induced thermogenesis.

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  • 2016-12

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Blood Flow as a Biomarker for Diet Induced Thermogenesis

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Adaptive thermogenesis is an innate mechanism that assists the body in controlling its core temperature that can be stimulated in two ways: cold and diet. When adaptive thermogenesis is stimulated

Adaptive thermogenesis is an innate mechanism that assists the body in controlling its core temperature that can be stimulated in two ways: cold and diet. When adaptive thermogenesis is stimulated through diet, the metabolic rate of the body should increase and the metabolic efficiency of the body should decrease. This activation should, theoretically, help to control weight gain. A protocol was developed to study four male Sprague-Dawley rats throughout a fourteen week period through the measurement of brown adipose tissue blood flow and brown adipose tissue, back, and abdomen temperatures to determine if diet induced thermogenesis existed and could be activated through norepinephrine. The sedative used to obtain blood flow measurements, ketamine, was discovered to induce a thermal response prior to the norepinephrine injection by mimicking the norepinephrine response in the sympathetic nervous system. This discovery altered the original protocol to exclude an injection of norepinephrine, as this injection would have no further thermal effect. It was found that ketamine sedation excited diet induced thermogenesis in periods of youth, low fat diet, and early high fat diet. The thermogenic capacity was found to be at a peak of 2.1 degrees Celsius during this time period. The data also suggested that the activation of diet induced thermogenesis decreased as the period of high fat diet increased, and by week 4 of the high fat diet, almost all evidence of diet induced thermogenesis was suppressed. This indicated that diet induced thermogenesis is time and diet dependent. Further investigation will need to be made to determine if prolonged high fat diet or age suppress diet induced thermogenesis.

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  • 2016-12

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Low-Income Mexican-American Mothers and Infants and the Effects of Breastfeeding on Obesity Rates

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This research addresses the importance of factors such as gestational weight gain (GWG) and postpartum weight of mothers, as well as obesity rates in infants born to these mothers who

This research addresses the importance of factors such as gestational weight gain (GWG) and postpartum weight of mothers, as well as obesity rates in infants born to these mothers who are included in the population of low-income Mexican-American mothers and infants enrolled in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC). Evaluating these factors will contribute to finding recommendations to help solve the obesity epidemic in this specific population. Breastfeeding duration, mother BMI, infant birth weight, and infant weight z-scores were statistically analyzed from a WIC population in Houston. The study participants are involved in a five year intervention study where the home environment and education on feeding practices, breastfeeding duration and obesity are evaluated. The results found that: (1) breastfeeding initially indicates a further continuation of breastfeeding; (2) mothers who breastfed for six months were likely to have a lower BMI at twelve to eighteen months than those who did not; (3) the birth weight of the infant is associated with the weight pattern of the child later; (4) the weight/height percentiles of a newborn are somewhat likely to stay the same until age three; (5) the prenatal weight of the mother impacts the weight of the newborn infant; and (6) the mother's postpartum BMI at one week is associated with a similar BMI at 12 months postpartum. In conclusion, women in this population tend to not breastfeed for 6 months and are not losing gestational weight postpartum, leading to increased wright retention after pregnancy, as well as heavier babies that will maintain this weight in early childhood. Further breastfeeding, nutrition, exercise, obesity, and proper infant feeding education are needed to reduce the rate of obesity in low-income Mexican-American WIC populations.

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  • 2016-12

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The Effects of Caloric Restriction on Insulin Resistance in Diet-Induced Obese Rats

Description

For the past couple decades, there has been a continuous rise in obesity and Type II Diabetes which has been attributed to the rise in calorically dense diets, especially those

For the past couple decades, there has been a continuous rise in obesity and Type II Diabetes which has been attributed to the rise in calorically dense diets, especially those heavy in fats. Because of its rising prevalence, accompanied health concerns, and high healthcare costs, detection and therapies for these metabolic diseases are in high demand. Insulin resistance is a typical hallmark of Type II Diabetes and the metabolic deficiencies in obesity and is the main focus of this project. The primary purpose of this study is (1) detect the presence of two types of insulin resistance (peripheral and hepatic) as a function of age, (2) distinguish if diet impacted the presence of insulin resistance, and (3) determine both the short-term and long-term effects of caloric restriction on metabolic health. The following study longitudinally observed the changes in insulin resistance in high-fat fed and low-fat fed rodents under ad libitum and caloric restriction conditions over the course of 23 weeks. Fasting blood glucose, fasting insulin, body weight, and sensitivity of insulin on tissue were monitored in order to determine peripheral and hepatic insulin resistance. A high fat diet resulted in higher body weights and higher hepatic insulin resistance with no notable effect on peripheral insulin resistance. Caloric restriction was found to alleviate insulin resistance both during caloric restriction and four weeks after caloric restriction ended. Due to sample size, the generalizability of the findings in this study are limited. However, the current study did provide considerable results and can be viewed as a pilot study for a larger-scale study.

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  • 2018-05

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Upregulation of Adipose Tissue APOE Expression by ω3PUFA Supplmentation Associates with Decreased Plasma FFA Levels and Improves Insulin Sensitivity in Obese Subjects: A Reflection of My Time Working in Research and Where I Am Now

Description

Long chain ω-3PUFA fatty acid supplementation in animal models of diet-induced-obesity has consistently shown to improve insulin sensitivity. The same is not always reported in studies with obese, insulin resistant

Long chain ω-3PUFA fatty acid supplementation in animal models of diet-induced-obesity has consistently shown to improve insulin sensitivity. The same is not always reported in studies with obese, insulin resistant (IR) subjects. We studied whether high-dose ω-3PUFA supplementation for 3 months improves insulin sensitivity and adipose tissue (AT) inflammation in severely obese, IR subjects. Thirteen obese, IR subjects underwent 80 mU/m 2· min euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp with subcutaneous (Sc) AT biopsy before and after three months of ω-3PUFA (DHA & EPA, 4g/daily) supplementation. Cytoadipokine plasma profiles were assessed before and after ω-3PUFA. AT-specific inflammatory gene expression was evaluated on Sc fat biopsies. Microarray analysis was performed on the fat biopsies collected during the program. Palmitic and stearic acid plasma levels were significantly reduced (P<0.05) after ω-3PUFA. Gene expression of pro-inflammatory markers and adipokines were improved after ω-3PUFA (P<0.05). Systemic inflammation was decreased after ω-3PUFA, as shown by cytokine assessment (P<0.05). These changes were associated with a 25% increase in insulin-stimulated glucose disposal (4.67±0.62mg/kg ffm•min vs 5.87±0.79mg/kg ffm•min) despite no change in
body weight. Microarray analysis identified 53 probe sets significantly altered post- ω-3PUFA, with APOE being one of the most upregulated genes. High dose of long chain ω-3PUFA supplementation modulates significant changes in plasma fatty acid profile, AT and systemic inflammation. These findings associate with significant improvement of insulin-stimulated glucose disposal. Unbiased microarray analysis of Sc fat biopsy identified APOE as the most differentially regulated gene after ω-3PUFA 22 supplementation. We speculate that ω-3PUFA increases macrophage-derived APOE mRNA levels with anti-inflammatory properties.

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  • 2020-05