Matching Items (11)

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A Comparative Study of the Employee Experience in the United States and Denmark

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Abstract The United States continues to face problems in the workplace in regards to happiness, satisfaction, and engagement. In comparison, Denmark consistently ranks as one of the happiest countries in

Abstract The United States continues to face problems in the workplace in regards to happiness, satisfaction, and engagement. In comparison, Denmark consistently ranks as one of the happiest countries in the world. This paper serves to describe the norms and cultural aspects that may explain why each country has its respective outcomes in regards to the employee experience. The paper concludes with possible recommendations that organizations can adopt to help improve the employee experience in the United States.

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Date Created
  • 2017-05

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Walt Disney World College Program Cast Members: Influencers or Influenced?

Description

This study examines the The Disney College Program, a semester-long paid internship hosted by the Walt Disney Company employing more than 10,000 students each year. With over 120,000 alumni in

This study examines the The Disney College Program, a semester-long paid internship hosted by the Walt Disney Company employing more than 10,000 students each year. With over 120,000 alumni in the past 10 years, this program offers students housing and community building opportunities within the "Living" component, college credit courses within the "Learning" component, and on-the-job experience at Disneyland Resort and Walt Disney World theme parks through the "Earning" component. Specifically, the research focuses on Walt Disney World in Orlando, Florida. The researcher conducted a 39-question online survey prompting 1,749 responses from Disney College Program alumni to help answer the following research questions: (1) Who are Disney College Program Cast Members, (2) What is their level of satisfaction with the program, and (3) Are they influencers? This study uses theoretical elements (e.g. levels of adoption, influencers and brand loyalty) to describe influence and psychological effects to describe satisfaction (e.g. indoctrination, human motivation and Stockholm Syndrome). With the findings showing discrepancies between the ratings of "Living," "Learning," and "Earning" and the average overall rating, some questions arise about the program's tendencies to form tightly cohesive groups approaching elements of Stockholm Syndrome and cult-like ethos. Focusing on the 1,490 of 1,749 respondents from Walt Disney World in the past 10 years, the study concludes that Walt Disney World College Program alumni are not influencers nor advocates, but rather evangelists (i.e., zealous advocate) and loyalists.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

Inspiring Innovative Leadership Behaviors to Improve Emergency Department Nurse Retention

Description

The World Health Organization (2010) reports the nursing shortage is a global issue. With the impact of the shortage causing concern for nurse leaders, retaining Registered Nurses (RNs) is an

The World Health Organization (2010) reports the nursing shortage is a global issue. With the impact of the shortage causing concern for nurse leaders, retaining Registered Nurses (RNs) is an effective strategy. The emergency department (ED) work environment provides an additional challenge to keep nurses as the ED is a fast-paced, critical care setting where RNs are providing care to multiple patients with a wide range of needs every shift. This paper will examine current literature addressing factors impacting and strategies for improving ED RN retention.

A systematic review of the literature showed relationship-focused/transformational leadership practices have a positive influence on job satisfaction and organizational commitment which translates to higher RN retention. The literature also indicated complexity leadership is needed in today’s changing health care environment. An evidence-based practice project was designed to assist the ED leaders evaluate and improve their leadership behaviors. A combination of education and coaching was provided, utilizing the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire to assess the participants’ self- and rater evaluations before and after the intervention.

Although the results were not statically significant, feedback from participants and observations by the coach identified the education and coaching did have an impact on individuals that actively participated in the project. Those that embraced the concepts and followed through on their action plans have continued to practice, further developing innovative leadership behaviors after the project timeframe was completed

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Date Created
  • 2016-04-29

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An On-Site Mindfulness-Based Intervention to Promote Wellness in the Workplace

Description

The purpose of this project is to implement an on-site mindfulness-based intervention to reduce stress and burnout among mental health care workers. Healthcare professionals are among the most stressed of

The purpose of this project is to implement an on-site mindfulness-based intervention to reduce stress and burnout among mental health care workers. Healthcare professionals are among the most stressed of any profession, and mental health workers are at an extremely high risk for burnout and compassion fatigue (Christopher & Meris, 2010) with an estimated 21% to 67% of mental health workers reporting that they experience high levels of burnout (Salyers et al., 2011).

After researching the literature, it was evident that practicing mindfulness can lead to less stress and higher job satisfaction. In an effort to combat this problem, an on-site mindfulness intervention was implemented at an outpatient psychiatric setting for eight weeks. Twenty-seven mental health workers gave their consent to be part of the study, and eleven were able to complete the study and self-assessment surveys for three time periods. The Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) (the Human Service Version) and a 1-item job satisfaction were used to measure the effect of intervention on employees’ levels of stress and job satisfaction.

A non-parametric Friedman test of differences among repeated measures was conducted and findings were not significant when comparing the average total scores of means between pre-, post-, or 1-month follow-up for Emotional Exhaustion (p = .148), Depersonalization (p = .223), Personal Achievement (p = .784) and job satisfaction (p = .422). The positive outcomes cited by participant support the thesis that the on-site mindfulness-based intervention is better than no intervention though the effect was not statistically significant.

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Date Created
  • 2016-04-29

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Three essays on bureaucracy at American research universities

Description

The three essays in this dissertation each examine how aspects of contemporary administrative structure within American research universities affect faculty outcomes. Specific aspects of administrative structure tested in this dissertation

The three essays in this dissertation each examine how aspects of contemporary administrative structure within American research universities affect faculty outcomes. Specific aspects of administrative structure tested in this dissertation include the introduction of new administrative roles, administrative intensity (i.e. relative size of university administration), and competing roles between faculty, administrators, and staff. Using quantitative statistical methods these aspects of administrative structure are tested for their effects on academic grant productivity, faculty job stress, and faculty job satisfaction. Administrative datasets and large scale national surveys make up the data for these studies and quantitative statistical methods confirm most of the hypothesized relationships.

In the first essay, findings from statistical modeling using instrumental variables suggest that academic researchers who receive administrative support for grant writing and management obtain fewer grants and have a lower success rate. However, the findings also suggest that the grants these researchers do receive are much larger in terms of dollars. The results indicate that administrative support is particularly beneficial in academic grant situations of high-risk, high-reward. In the second essay, ordered logit models reveal a statistically significant and stronger relationship between staff intensity (i.e., the ratio of faculty to staff workers) and faculty stress than the relationship between executive intensity (i.e., the ratio faculty to executive and managerial workers) and faculty job stress. These findings confirm theory that the work of faculty is more loosely coupled with the work of executives than it is with staff workers. A possible explanation is the increase in administrative work faculty must take on as there are fewer staff workers to take on administrative tasks. And finally, in the third essay results from multi-level modeling confirm that both role clarity and institutional support positively affect both a global measure of faculty job satisfaction and faculty satisfaction with how their work time is allocated. Understanding the effects that administrative structure has on faculty outcomes will aid universities as faculty administrative burdens ebb and flow in reaction to macro trends in higher education, such as unbundling of faculty roles, unbundling of services, neoliberalism, liberal arts decline, and administrative bloat.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017

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A survey of board-certified music therapists: perceptions of the profession, the impact of stress and burnout, and the need for self-care

Description

This descriptive research study explored practicing Board-Certified Music Therapists' engagement in self-care as needed from the impact of stress and burnout, as well as perceptions of the music therapy profession

This descriptive research study explored practicing Board-Certified Music Therapists' engagement in self-care as needed from the impact of stress and burnout, as well as perceptions of the music therapy profession and professional association. An online survey was completed by 829 practicing board certified music therapists. Mean scores and percentages of nominal variables were generated from an independent sample. ANOVA was used to compare mean scores of dependent variables with independent variables of two or more categories. Open-ended responses generated extensive qualitative data about stress/burnout, job satisfaction, motivation, and self-care. Those who are not currently members of AMTA reported affordability as the primary reason for not being members. Despite some negative perceptions about the profession and professional association, a significant number of music therapists expressed a passion for what they do. Music therapists appear to have a solid grasp on professional responsibilities and ethics. Although respondents reported an overall high level of job satisfaction, a substantial number agreed that they have considered leaving the profession. Low salary was the most commonly acknowledged reason, followed by the continued need to "sell" music therapy, burnout, stress, limited work opportunities, and workplace politics. Respondents identified healthy diet and rest as primary activities of self-care, followed by recreation/leisure time with loved ones, exercise, hobbies, and prayer. Music therapists reportedly continue to feel motivated and inspired in the profession predominantly because of the gratification/satisfaction of the results of their work, followed by engagement in self-care, loving the work regardless of income, attending conferences and symposiums, diversification among various populations, and keeping professional life separate from personal life. ANOVA results indicated that job satisfaction and engagement in self-care likely increase with age; job satisfaction is higher among married music therapists, those with children, and those with more than 30 years in practice; and those with no children and those with a master's or doctorate degree were more likely to engage in self-care. A variety of implications and recommendations are explored.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2013

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Understanding housekeeper's perceived labor mobility and job satisfaction within the hospitality industry in metropolitan Phoenix, Arizona, U.S.A

Description

The objective of this study was to understand domestic and foreign-born housekeeper's individual perceptions of labor mobility and job satisfaction related to their jobs within the hospitality industry. Literature regarding

The objective of this study was to understand domestic and foreign-born housekeeper's individual perceptions of labor mobility and job satisfaction related to their jobs within the hospitality industry. Literature regarding the bridging of tourism, immigration, and labor supply was addressed to expose broad conceptual frameworks that lead to the development of this study. More specifically, literature regarding labor mobility within tourism industries, migrant decision making, and barriers to mobility and immigration helped to construct a narrowed conceptual framework specific to hospitality labor in Phoenix, Arizona. Similar and previous studies focused on perceived labor mobility during significant economic or industry shifts. This study included the addition of a policy factor to help determine to what degree state policy change effected hospitality workers' perceived labor mobility. Arizona's recently passed and implemented legislative act SB1070 regards immigrant identification and employment, and enforcement of the act in the state of Arizona; this serves as the implicated policy change. Data were collected via on-site survey administered February to May 2011. An overall score was created for the five motivational dimensions: 1 — Status; 2 — Economic; 3 — Refugee; 4 — Entrepreneurial; and, 5 — Political using principle component factor analysis using a varimax rotation with Kaiser normalization. Theory and literature suggest that the economic advancement, status advancement, and the refugee orientation are effective explanatory variables for motivating a career move into the tourism industry. A total of 82 questionnaires were delivered and completed (N = 82), and none were eliminated. The statistically-determined Economic Dimension was characterized by eleven statements explained 51% of the variation and was the overwhelming motivational force. The average coded response for change in job satisfaction was very positive at .75. Ten features of changes in job satisfaction were used as the basis of the second measure of change in job satisfaction. The first Principle Component of the ten features of job satisfaction change explained 45% of the variation in these features and loadings were positive near or above 0.60 for all items. The relationship between variations in each of the measurements of change in job satisfaction and motivating factors was explored using regression analysis. The two dependent variables were Overall Change and First Principle Component, and the independent variables for both regressions included the four motivating factors as measured by the rotated factors scores to represent dimensions of Economic, Status, Refugee and Entrepreneurial. In addition to the motivational factors, four demographic variables were included as independent variables to account for personal and situational differences. None of the regression coefficients were significant at even the 10% level. Although this result was expected, the positive sign of regression coefficients suggest that expectations of working as a housekeepers results in a positive outcome. Understanding this relationship further is necessary, and seeking larger sample sizes over a longer period of time would be most beneficial to this field of research.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2011

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Teacher satisfaction among itinerant teachers of the deaf and hard of hearing

Description

Teachers of the deaf and hard of hearing have served Arizona since 1912 when the Arizona School for the Deaf and Blind opened in Tucson, Arizona. Several decades later the

Teachers of the deaf and hard of hearing have served Arizona since 1912 when the Arizona School for the Deaf and Blind opened in Tucson, Arizona. Several decades later the Phoenix Day School for the Deaf was established in the Phoenix metropolitan area. To reach deaf and visually impaired students in the rural areas of Arizona, itinerant teachers travel from school to school, providing instruction and consultation with families and school personnel. The purpose of the study was to examine the perceptions and attitudes of itinerant teachers of the deaf and hard of hearing as to job satisfaction. Four research questions addressed the roles and responsibilities of itinerant teachers: extent of teacher participation in professional development activities; the opinions and attitudes of teachers toward their work; and additional comments and concerns. To answer these questions, 43 participants from five cooperatives established by the Arizona State School for the Deaf and Blind responded to a modified version of the 2007-2008 Schools and Staffing Survey regarding itinerant teacher job satisfaction. Two open-ended questions made this survey a mixed methods study of both quantitative and qualitative data. It was found itinerant teachers worked with students with a variety of hearing losses and educational needs; worked with regular classroom teachers and other school personnel; planned, assessed, and kept records; coordinated and conducted consultation and IEP meetings; worked with parents; provided technical support; traveled to different schools to work with students; provided accommodations and modifications; and provided direct instruction to DHH students. As to professional development, participants found language strategies and content of subjects taught to be useful and most attended. Ninety-one percent of the cooperative teachers seemed satisfied as a teacher. They felt support from administration, were satisfied with how the cooperatives were managed, and agreed that they were recognized for their efforts. Some of the concerns from teachers were their salary, the paperwork involved with itinerant teaching, and the limited amount of resources available to them. Overall, the findings of this study provided a baseline of information that suggest more work needs to be done related to job satisfaction of itinerant teachers.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016

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Nonwork role importance as a moderator to the congruence-satisfaction relation

Description

Individuals are attracted to occupational environments that align with their interests and personality characteristics (Holland, 1985, 1997). When an individual's attributes (i.e., needs, abilities, values and/or interests) align with the

Individuals are attracted to occupational environments that align with their interests and personality characteristics (Holland, 1985, 1997). When an individual's attributes (i.e., needs, abilities, values and/or interests) align with the occupational environment's characteristics an individual is more satisfied. Past research suggests this relation is modest at best, hovering between .20 and .30 (Meyer et al., 2001, c.f. Wilkins & Tracey, 2014), with slightly higher estimates (ranging from .24 to .35) depending on how the variables of person and environment were measured (Kristof-Brown, Zimmerman, & Johnson, 2005). Several factors contribute to such low estimates, most notably the role of moderator variables in suppressing or exacerbating the true magnitude of this relation. A moderator that has yet to be explored is that of nonwork role priority, or the degree to which an individual's work identity is valued relative to other role identities. In the current study, three hypotheses were posited to investigate nonwork role priorities as a potential moderator to the congruence-satisfaction relation. Latent class analysis was used to apply a person-centered approach to understanding response patterns and differences in these roles. The sample was differentiated best by a two-class solution and the class variable in all three hierarchical regression models explained about five percent of the variance in job satisfaction, which suggests that work and nonwork role priority are meaningful to understanding individual career happiness. Class was not identified as a significant moderator to the congruence-satisfaction relation. Discussion of limitations to the current study and recommendations for future work in this area are presented.

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Date Created
  • 2016

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Predictors and outcomes of engagement and embeddedness among unskilled production line employees

Description

Over the past several years, engagement and embeddedness have become popular research topics for academics and practitioners alike. Research has demonstrated associations between these constructs and a variety of predictors

Over the past several years, engagement and embeddedness have become popular research topics for academics and practitioners alike. Research has demonstrated associations between these constructs and a variety of predictors and outcomes. Prior research has not, however, placed enough emphasis on the roles of employee type, industry type, and work setting in determining predictors and outcomes. Additionally, the relative roles of engagement and embeddedness in predicting outcomes have not been thoroughly investigated. This study investigated the predictors and outcomes of engagement and embeddedness among unskilled, production line employees working in food processing in the agricultural industry by conducting a survey of employees and their supervisors. Employees answered questions about personality, motivation, satisfaction, engagement, and embeddedness while supervisors answered questions about each employee's performance. Results suggest that both engagement and embeddedness predict employee satisfaction and that engagement does so more strongly, both of which support prior research. However, results contradict prior research by suggesting that embeddedness is strongly predicted by traits internal to the employee while engagement is not, and neither engagement nor embeddedness significantly predicts employee performance. Further, the findings suggest that employees working in different settings and industries may experience work differently, and the measurements used to understand their experiences should reflect these differences.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2012