Matching Items (3)

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Cultural Competency in Child Life: Is There a Gap Between Cultures in Pediatric Care That We Can Fill?

Description

Intercultural competency is becoming more crucial for effective communication as the world becomes more global and interconnected. This issue is particularly true in health care settings, where effective communication is

Intercultural competency is becoming more crucial for effective communication as the world becomes more global and interconnected. This issue is particularly true in health care settings, where effective communication is essential for providing the best care possible. There is very little research about intercultural competence training for Child Life Specialists whose primary role is to communicate with the patients and parents. The purposes of this study was to investigate 1) the levels of cultural competency training Child Life Specialists (CLSs) report having received, as well as their interest in more training, 2) assessing the extent to which CLSs are providing culturally competent care (self-reported), 3) understanding the extent to which barriers to providing culturally competent care are present, 4) identifying relations between culturally competent practice, barriers, and perceived feelings of success, and 5) determining whether there are group differences on culturally competent practice, barriers, and perceived feelings of success between those who reported having received training and those who reported no training. A total of 42 Child Life Specialists completed an online survey. Results indicated a variety of training experiences, with those reporting more training perceiving fewer barriers to culturally competent care. A strong interest in more training was also revealed.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-12

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Cultural Competency in Health Care Delivery in the United States

Description

What is being done to promote cultural sensitivity in healthcare settings? To find answers and solutions to the widespread deficit of cultural competence in the health care industry, this case

What is being done to promote cultural sensitivity in healthcare settings? To find answers and solutions to the widespread deficit of cultural competence in the health care industry, this case study interviews a varied sample of five physicians consisting of three men and two women in clinical, academic, and administrative positions. The hypothesis was physicians do not receive cultural sensitivity training in medical school and as a result, they have to find other ways to learn about the cultures of their patients. None of the participants had received formal cultural competency training in medical school and all of them found methods to improve their cultural literacy. The study uncovered the cultural training physicians do receive is sporadic and inconsistent, which can cause some disconnect between education and real-life clinical practice. Many solutions to improve cultural competency in health care delivery are presented. The results of this exploratory research should be used to inspire future conversations about cultural competency in health care as well as the creation of support and educational services and materials to medical students and health care workers on improving cultural sensitivity in clinical practice.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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A culturally competent behavioral weight loss program for adult Latinos with a BMI >30kg/m2

Description

This study answers the question, “In Adult Hispanic BMI ≥ 30 (P), how does development of a weight loss program that utilizes Motivational Interviewing (I) compared to counseling and educational

This study answers the question, “In Adult Hispanic BMI ≥ 30 (P), how does development of a weight loss program that utilizes Motivational Interviewing (I) compared to counseling and educational materials only (C) affect weight loss over the period of three months (T).” There are limited published systematic reviews and randomized control trials to evaluate the effectiveness of Motivational Interviewing (MI), in conjunction with diet and exercise to promote weight loss. Participants (n = 5) were Latino patients of a local community health care center who were overweight and medically at risk due to unhealthy lifestyles that were determined through a screening test.

The 4-week clinical pathway program used motivational interviewing in one-on-one sessions every other week, and implemented the “Your Heart, Your Life” curriculum the other weeks. One expected outcome included lower anthropometric measurement numbers of participants’ WL, BMI, WC, and BP. Another expected outcome was an increase in physical activity. Participants were also expected to earn a higher score on a post-test about nutrition and healthy living. A paired t-test and power analyses were used to assess its effectiveness.

Results indicated significant decrease in weight loss (t [5] = 3.68, p = .0211, Cohen’s dz=1.647). For heart healthy habits, there were significant increases all three categories: weight management (t [5] = - 3.36, p = .0211), cholesterol and fat (t [5] = - 3.138, p =.035, salt and sodium (t [5] = - 4.899, p = .008). In addition, there was an increase in knowledge (t [5] = - 4.000, p = .016). Every participant showed small gains. Future implications should include more participants, including males, a control group, innovative activities that help to motivate a community of learners and more flexibility in allotted time for interventions.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05-06