Matching Items (13)

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Enabling Parents Online: Creating an Online Lesson Platform

Description

Customized online education is a means of educating a large amount of users in a way that will change their behavior at a low incremental cost to the one providing

Customized online education is a means of educating a large amount of users in a way that will change their behavior at a low incremental cost to the one providing the information. This thesis will examine several aspects of online education, but primarily focus on the presentation of the materials. It will examine how this is done through a consulting project I worked on in conjunction with the New Venture Group for Parenting Arizona. Parenting Arizona is a non-profit organization based in Arizona that offers classes for parents who are seeking better ways to manage their family responsibilities. The purpose of the consulting project was to take the instructional materials used in in-person group classes and modify it to be effectively used for instruction in an online environment. Parenting Arizona foresaw a number of benefits from this modification and migration of instructional materials for the web; first among these was the ability of people in remote areas or in situations that did not allow them to attend an on-ground class to gain access to instructional material. In addition, the broader availability of the material that would come from its presence on the web would expand the influence of good parenting instructions to a greater audience both inside and outside the State of Arizona, aiding even more families.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2012-05

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Perspectives of Online Education at Arizona State University

Description

By distributing a survey to students and professors, this study investigates the perceptions of online education at Arizona State University and uses statistical analysis to establish connections between the characteristics

By distributing a survey to students and professors, this study investigates the perceptions of online education at Arizona State University and uses statistical analysis to establish connections between the characteristics of individuals and the opinions that they have about online education. In relation to online education, this study investigates the topics of academic dishonesty, learning effectiveness, increasing diversity in the university, the effect on reputation, the academic rigor of courses, societal obligations, and overall opinions of online education as a whole. The aggregate results of these surveys were then compared to the categorized results of students and professors, students with varied levels of GPA, students with varied exposure to online classes, and students with varied majors of study. These comparisons were used to establish statistical correlations between an individual's occupation in a specific category and the types of opinions they have regarding online education.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

Can Online Learning Work for Everyone?

Description

This podcast considers the history of online courses in higher education and research into them, focusing on how well they serve a diverse student population. It considers how online learning

This podcast considers the history of online courses in higher education and research into them, focusing on how well they serve a diverse student population. It considers how online learning developed, and how studies into the practices and effectiveness of online courses find inequality in academic outcomes and access. The podcast explores how research approaches bring to light these inequalities or fail to consider them. The future of online learning is also considered.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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Intelligent Input Parser for Organic Chemistry Reagent Questions

Description

Due to its difficult nature, organic chemistry is receiving much research attention across the nation to develop more efficient and effective means to teach it. As part of that, Dr.

Due to its difficult nature, organic chemistry is receiving much research attention across the nation to develop more efficient and effective means to teach it. As part of that, Dr. Ian Gould at ASU is developing an online organic chemistry educational website that provides help to students, adapts to their responses, and collects data about their performance. This thesis creative project addresses the design and implementation of an input parser for organic chemistry reagent questions, to appear on his website. After students used the form to submit questions throughout the Spring 2013 semester in Dr. Gould's organic chemistry class, the data gathered from their usage was analyzed, and feedback was collected. The feedback obtained from students was positive, and suggested that the input parser accomplished the educational goals that it sought to meet.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2013-05

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Best Practices for Enhancing Teaching Presence in Online Courses

Description

Online education has become increasingly popular in graduate nursing education. Establishing a strong sense of teaching presence in online courses requires planning and effort on the part of

Online education has become increasingly popular in graduate nursing education. Establishing a strong sense of teaching presence in online courses requires planning and effort on the part of the instructor. The purpose of this project was to develop an evidence-based online asynchronous educational module to enhance nurse educators’ teaching presence behaviors in online courses. Teaching presence survey tools were developed and pilot tested to evaluate instructors’ self-reported teaching presence behaviors over time, as well as their intent and actual follow-through in performing teaching presence behaviors. Despite statistically significant higher levels of participants’ intent to perform teaching presence behaviors following the educational module, there was no significant change in the frequency of teaching presence behaviors reported by participants 8 weeks after completion of the module. Overall, the self-reported scores for each of the teaching presence behaviors on the surveys was high, offering little perceived room for improvement in this group of experienced instructors.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-04-06

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Learning to speak in the digital age: an examination of instructional conditions for teaching public speaking online

Description

This dissertation study quantitatively measured the performance of 345 students who received public speaking instruction through an online platform presented in one of six experimental conditions in order to explore

This dissertation study quantitatively measured the performance of 345 students who received public speaking instruction through an online platform presented in one of six experimental conditions in order to explore the ability of online lectures to replicate the characteristics of instructor presence and learner interaction traditionally associated with face-to-face public speaking courses. The study investigated the following research questions:

RQ1: How does the visibility of an instructor in a public speaking video lesson affect students' perception of presence?

RQ2: How does the visibility of an instructor in a public speaking video lesson affect student learning?

RQ3: How do self-explanation (Constructive) and note-taking (Active) types of learning activities affect students' perception of presence compared to passive lessons when presented in a video lesson?

RQ4: How do self-explanation (Constructive) and note-taking (Active) types of learning activities affect student learning compared to passive lessons when presented in a video lesson?

Additionally, the study collected qualitative feedback from participants on their experience in order to improve understanding of how to effectively design lectures for public speaking courses.

Results of the study were unable to statistically distinguish between students assigned to treatments that varied in both modality and level of activity. However, a significant finding of this study is that learning gains and students' perception of instructor presence were positive across all conditions.

The lack of significant differences by treatment indicates that the design attributes at the center of the study may be unnecessary considerations for developing content for online learning. Consequently, the improved performance of participants regardless of their assigned treatment in this study identifies a limitation to the application of Media Equation Theory and the Interactive-Constructive-Active-Passive (ICAP) Framework for designing online learning content for public speaking students as well as identifies two key implications: 1) exposure to an online lesson can increase learning; and 2) exposure to an online lesson can serve as a cost-effective alternative for producing lessons in public speaking courses.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014

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Supporting K-12 online learners: developing a mentorship program

Description

Online education is unique in part for the relatively high degrees of autonomy afforded learners. Self-direction and self-regulation, along with support, are essential for students to succeed. The site of

Online education is unique in part for the relatively high degrees of autonomy afforded learners. Self-direction and self-regulation, along with support, are essential for students to succeed. The site of this action research project was a new, small online public charter school for middle and high school students, Foothills Academy Connected (FAC). The purpose of this action research project was to develop an online learner support system that was built around mentorship and based on the four areas identified by the Educational Success Prediction Instrument (ESPRI) (Roblyer & Davis, 2008); thoroughly document the process; and examine its influence on students and the researcher. This study was focused on: (a) identifying students’ main challenges with online learning, (b) identifying students’ perceptions about additional supports that would improve their schooling experience, and (c) examining the process of engaging in mentorship by the emerging mentor, herself.

The study employed a mixed methods research design. Research instruments included a questionnaire adapted from the ESPRI that marked the start of the study period, visual autoethnographies, interviews, extensive research journaling to document interactions with students and parents/guardians, and a second questionnaire. The research results showed that the “emerging mentorship approach” was a worthwhile innovation for augmenting the FAC online learner student support system. In particular, developing individual student profiles based on this varied data and responding to those students’ needs were accompanied by detailed documentation to develop a mentoring approach that could be used subsequently. A finding of the research was that the ESPRI would not have been effective alone in determining a student profile and responding only on that basis. The ESPRI areas of inquiry were helpful when used in conjunction with the other data to frame students’ needs and formulate personalized plans to support struggling online learners. Online learner support literature provided scant detail on the personal experience of the individual adopting the mentor role. In this study, it was determined that the process of becoming a mentor was uncomfortable and nonlinear, and it challenged the self-directedness and boldness of the action researcher as she worked in this new role as mentor.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017

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Predicting student success in a self-paced mathematics MOOC

Description

While predicting completion in Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) has been an active area of research in recent years, predicting completion in self-paced MOOCS, the fastest growing segment of open

While predicting completion in Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) has been an active area of research in recent years, predicting completion in self-paced MOOCS, the fastest growing segment of open online courses, has largely been ignored. Using learning analytics and educational data mining techniques, this study examined data generated by over 4,600 individuals working in a self-paced, open enrollment college algebra MOOC over a period of eight months.

Although just 4% of these students completed the course, models were developed that could predict correctly nearly 80% of the time which students would complete the course and which would not, based on each student’s first day of work in the online course. Logistic regression was used as the primary tool to predict completion and focused on variables associated with self-regulated learning (SRL) and demographic variables available from survey information gathered as students begin edX courses (the MOOC platform employed).

The strongest SRL predictor was the amount of time students spent in the course on their first day. The number of math skills obtained the first day and the pace at which these skills were gained were also predictors, although pace was negatively correlated with completion. Prediction models using only SRL data obtained on the first day in the course correctly predicted course completion 70% of the time, whereas models based on first-day SRL and demographic data made correct predictions 79% of the time.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017

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Improving proctoring by using non-verbal cues during remotely administrated exams

Description

This study investigated the ability to relate a test taker’s non-verbal cues during online assessments to probable cheating incidents. Specifically, this study focused on the role of time delay, head

This study investigated the ability to relate a test taker’s non-verbal cues during online assessments to probable cheating incidents. Specifically, this study focused on the role of time delay, head pose and affective state for detection of cheating incidences in a lab-based online testing session. The analysis of a test taker’s non-verbal cues indicated that time delay, the variation of a student’s head pose relative to the computer screen and confusion had significantly statistical relation to cheating behaviors. Additionally, time delay, head pose relative to the computer screen, confusion, and the interaction term of confusion and time delay were predictors in a support vector machine of cheating prediction with an average accuracy of 70.7%. The current algorithm could automatically flag suspicious student behavior for proctors in large scale online courses during remotely administered exams.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015

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Developing Social Presence as an Academic Advisor for Online Graduate Business Students

Description

For more than 30 years, social science researchers have studied how students in online learning environments interact with each other. This has led to the development of a construct called

For more than 30 years, social science researchers have studied how students in online learning environments interact with each other. This has led to the development of a construct called social presence. Studies have shown that high social presence can lead to improved student retention, engagement, and satisfaction. The literature explores how social presence has been measured by faculty or researchers, but lacks insight on how other university staff can affect social presence in online graduate students. This is an action research mixed-methods study conducted by an academic advisor and attempts to measure social presence through a webpage intervention for an online graduate business program. A pre-and-posttest were conducted in a five month span, as well as semi-structured interviews with students of the program. Results suggest that overall, the intervention did not increase social presence in the program. It also suggests that social presence is developed between students in a variety of ways, and can even be developed between their academic advisor and themselves. Overall, this study acknowledges how academic advisors can explore social presence to improve academic advising techniques and interventions for their programs, while also adding to the literature a different perspective through the eyes of a university staff member.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020