Matching Items (3)

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Improving the Care Transition to Outpatient Aftercare Services Following Addiction Treatment

Description

The chronic nature of substance use disorder requires continuity of care after residential treatment. Only a small proportion of patients, however, adhere to aftercare follow-up plans and the relapse rates

The chronic nature of substance use disorder requires continuity of care after residential treatment. Only a small proportion of patients, however, adhere to aftercare follow-up plans and the relapse rates remain between 40- 80% within a year post-discharge. Synthesis of evidence showed that facilitated referral (FR) significantly increased follow- up adherence and resulted to positive outcomes. The study aimed to examine the effectiveness of FR in improving access, follow-up adherence and engagement to aftercare services, and relapse rate after a month post- discharge.

After the Institutional Review Board approval, 30 participants were recruited in two residential treatment facilities. Questionnaires, the Assessment of Warning Signs of Relapse and Health leads surveys were utilized to collect data. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, McNemar, and Wilcoxon signed rank tests. Results showed that FR significantly increased access to many community aftercare services (p<.05). A significant reduction in relapse risk post-intervention was also noted (Z= -3.180, p= .001). Additionally, most participants discharged with scheduled appointments followed-up and had continued engagement with aftercare services. Eight participants maintained sobriety and 18 were lost to follow-up a month post-discharge, while four relapsed in the facility.

Overall, FR increased access to needed aftercare services and significantly decreased the relapse percentage risk post-discharge. FR is a promising intervention that can be implemented for practice. Future research is recommended to further examine the correlation with follow-up adherence and continuous engagement to aftercare services, and relapse rate at 30 days after discharge.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-04-29

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Pilot Psychosocial Screening Protocol in Children with Congenital Heart Disease

Description

Children with congenital heart disease (CHD) are at increased risk for psychosocial issues (PSI), decreased quality of life (QOL), and decreased resilience. The purpose of this project was to implement

Children with congenital heart disease (CHD) are at increased risk for psychosocial issues (PSI), decreased quality of life (QOL), and decreased resilience. The purpose of this project was to implement a screening protocol for PSI, QOL, and resilience, with appropriate psychosocial referral for children with CHD.

A pilot protocol was implemented to screen children with CHD, aged 8-17 years, and parents, for resilience, QOL, and PSI. Referrals for psychosocial services were made for 84.2% of children screened (n = 16) based on scoring outcomes. Statistically significant differences in the parents and children’s resilience mean scores were noted. Higher parental scores may indicate that parents believe their children are more resilient than the children perceive themselves to be.
Early identification of concerns regarding QOL, resilience, and PSI in children with CHD can provide ongoing surveillance, while affording opportunities for improved communication between providers, parents, and children. Routine screening and longitudinal follow-up is recommended.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-04-30

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The Impact of Provider Education on Pediatric Palliative Care Referral

Description

Introduction: Palliative care can significantly benefit children managing a life-limiting illness; unfortunately, services are generally reserved for end of life. The aim of this project was to demonstrate how established

Introduction: Palliative care can significantly benefit children managing a life-limiting illness; unfortunately, services are generally reserved for end of life. The aim of this project was to demonstrate how established guidelines coupled with provider education could impact referrals.

Methods: Educational sessions developed using information processing theory and outlining referral recommendations were offered to providers in the NICU, PICU, and Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders at a tertiary care facility. Presurveys and postsurveys were administered at the time of the intervention and referral numbers for the organization were collected for two months prior and two months following.

Results: Descriptive statistics and paired t-tests were used to compare survey data and referral rates.

Discussion: Palliative care is imperative for meeting patient goals and optimizing quality of life. Provider knowledge of referral criteria ensures that patients receive this service early in their disease trajectory and can benefit from its inclusion within their care team.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-04-27