Matching Items (6)

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Factors Influencing Patient Satisfaction in the Dental Clinics of the Underserved Communities: A Systematic Literature Review

Description

The purpose of this study is to explore the possible factors that influence how patients rate their dentists in the underserved communities and how commonly each factors are mentioned in

The purpose of this study is to explore the possible factors that influence how patients rate their dentists in the underserved communities and how commonly each factors are mentioned in the articles found from the systematic review. PubMed was used to search the articles with the keywords categorized into 5 different groups, they were: dental/oral, underserved, patient satisfaction, services provided and America. The search resulted in 123 articles and after critical appraisal and review, 19 full text articles were determined to be fully relevant to this project. A table of summarized results from the articles was created and factors of satisfaction from the articles were translated into a category which then was categorize into broader category based on relatedness. Sub-categories that were mentioned at least five times in the articles were cost, insurance acceptance, communication, interpersonal skills, number of treatments, fear/worry/anxiety and pain. According to the findings, quality in terms of interaction and interpersonal relationship between patients and the dentists was most mentioned compared to other factors when it comes to patient satisfaction. Other factors mentioned were external factors, pain, continuity, access, cost, technical qualities, efficiency, convenience, availability and environment. The purpose of this study has been met. The results in this project suggest that dentists in underserved communities could focus on changing the way they deliver their service if they want to improve patient retention and satisfaction.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

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The Hospital Experience: Perception and Memories Across the Lifespan

Description

This work is a mixed-methods study performed to evaluate the variance in patients’ hospital experiences at different stages of life. A survey of patients’ personal experience was designed based on

This work is a mixed-methods study performed to evaluate the variance in patients’ hospital experiences at different stages of life. A survey of patients’ personal experience was designed based on information on healthcare practice from peer-reviewed journals and concepts from the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems survey (Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, 2020). This study examined differences in how patients perceive memories of the hospital at the time of admission to the perception of their memories in the present day. The strength of association between past perceptions of overall experience with various aspects of the hospital experience was analyzed by calculating eta. The percent of variance in perception of experience that is explained by each aspect of the experience was then calculated by eta squared. Results were separated by age group at the time of admission to determine factors most likely to affect each group’s experience. Age groups 10 years and younger and 11-14 years were both concerned with the atmosphere of the hospital. All groups complained about their quality of sleep and the quality of the food, however, a majority of the complaints came from age groups 15-17 years and 18-21 years. The four age groups from 22-35+ years did not have enough participants to draw age specific conclusions by themselves and were therefore combined into one group, 22+ years. The 22+ years age group complained the most about noise, they complained about day noise in addition to night noise.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-12

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Imagineering healthcare: a healing environment design model based on experiential design, authenticity and Disney's design approaches

Description

Healthcare is one of the most personal and complex services provided, and as such, designing healthcare environments is particularly challenging. In the last couple of decades, researchers have concentrated their

Healthcare is one of the most personal and complex services provided, and as such, designing healthcare environments is particularly challenging. In the last couple of decades, researchers have concentrated their efforts on exploring the elements of the hospital environment that affect patients' health and in finding ways to apply that knowledge in contemporary healthcare design. But despite the growing body of research, there is an element of utmost importance to healing environments that has not been studied very extensively: the patient experience. The interaction of patients with their environment shapes their personal experience, and inversely, focusing on designing experiences rather than services can inform the design of successful healing environments. This shift from designing services to designing experiences has deep implications in healthcare settings because of the stressful situations that patients have to go through; memorable experiences have a positive influence on a patient's emotional health because they help minimize stress and in healthcare environments this translates into improved outcomes. The concept of assembling experiences is not new, especially in the entertainment industry; it was, in fact, the underlying principle behind the creation of the first theme park more than fifty years ago: Disneyland. Today, Disney is an entertainment industry leader and their design concepts and practices have been perfected to achieve the Company's main purpose: to immerse Guests in a happy, unforgettable experience. This research study focuses on examining the principles used by Disney designers, or Imagineers, as they are called within the organization, to generate memorable experiences, and how those theories can be adopted and adapted by healthcare designers to create better healing environments. However, Disney's Imagineering is not the only approach considered in this research. A thorough analysis would not be complete without delving into the concept of experiential design as a design process and from an economical perspective, as well as without analyzing recent notions about the importance of authenticity in businesses and its implications on design. This study, therefore, suggests a new healing environment design model based on a comprehensive review of the literature related to three main design approaches: Disney Imagineering, experiential design and authenticity.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2012

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E-patients and social media: impact of online experience on perceived quality of care

Description

Social media sites focusing on health-related topics are rapidly gaining popularity among online health consumers, also known as "e-patients". The increasing adoption of social media by e-patients and their demand

Social media sites focusing on health-related topics are rapidly gaining popularity among online health consumers, also known as "e-patients". The increasing adoption of social media by e-patients and their demand for reliable health information has prompted several health care organizations (HCOs) to establish their social media presence. HCOs are using social media to connect with current and potential e-patients, and improve patient education and overall quality of care. A significant benefit for HCOs in using social media could potentially be the improvement of their quality of care, as perceived by patients. Perceived quality of care is a key determinant of patients' experience and satisfaction with health care services, and has been a major focus of research. However, there is very little research on the relationship between patients' online social media experience and their perceived quality of care. The objective of this research was to evaluate e-patients' online experience with an HCO's social media sites and examine its impact on their perceived quality of care. Research methodology included a combination of qualitative and quantitative approaches. Data for this study was collected from Mayo Clinic's social media sites through an online survey. Descriptive statistics were used to identify basic demographic profiles of e-patients. Linear regression analysis was used to examine the relationship between online experience and perceived quality of care. Qualitative data was analyzed using thematic analysis. Results showed a positive relationship between online experience and perceived quality of care. Qualitative data provided information about e-patients' attitudes and expectations from healthcare social media. Overall, results yielded insights on design and management of social media sites for e-patients, and integration of these online applications in the health care delivery process. This study is of value to HCOs, health communicators and social media designers, and will also serve as a foundation for subsequent studies in the area of health care social media.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2011

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Open-Access Scheduling

Description

Declaration of Conflicts: This project has no conflicts of interest to declare.

Context: This project was completed at a federally qualified primary healthcare clinic in Phoenix, Arizona that served patients

Declaration of Conflicts: This project has no conflicts of interest to declare.

Context: This project was completed at a federally qualified primary healthcare clinic in Phoenix, Arizona that served patients of all age groups, but primarily cared for the Hispanic population providing primary care, preventative services, family planning, two lab technicians, one promoter, two medical assistant supervisors, five front desk staff, one chief administrative officer, one chief financial officer, two medical directoers who were also providers at the clinic.

Problem and Analysis Assessment: During my clinical rotations, I saw the burden a missed patient appointment had not only on the patients themselves, but also on the clinic, providers, and the staff. It caused delay in treatment for patients, and it did not allow other patients that wanted to be seen to be seen. It also increased unnecessary costs and wasted provider time. Thereafter, I met with some of the leadership team and one of the medical directors to determine a solution to reduce the number of missed appointments that were occurring. An educational session was kept to discuss the findings of this problem to the providers and the staff and when surveys were handed out to the patients, providers, and staff to assess their satisfaction with the old scheduling system versus the new scheduling system, they were also provided with a cover letter discussing the project.

Intervention: In order for improvements in care to occur, a system process change including the way patients are scheduled must occur. In this case, an open-access scheduling system (OAS) was implemented. OAS allows a patient to schedule an appointment on the 'same-day' or the 'next-day' to be seen. One provider at each of the clinics, each day of the week was available for 'same-day' appointments from 1300-1600. The providers were still available for scheduled appointments using the previous scheduling method. Walk-ins were still accepted, and were scheduled based on patient provider preference; however, if an appointment was not available for their preferred provider, they were typically seen with the provider that was the 'same-day' provider for that day.

Strategy for change: Since patients were only allowed to schedule appointments one month in advance, only one month was needed to implement this process change. A recommendation for the future would be to clearly identify the patient encounter type, and label it as a same-day appointment, as this would be helpful when gathering and extracting data for this type of patient group specifically.

Measurement of Improvement: Over a three-month period, a data collection plan was used to determine the number of Mas over a three-month period before and after implementation of this change. Satisfaction scores were measured using likert scales for patients, provider, and staff, and a dichotomous scale was used to determine the likelihood of emergency room or urgent care use. A comparison was done to measure revenue during the same time frame. During the three months, a clinically significant decrease in MAs was seen (<0.52%), with an increase in revenue by 41%. Additionally, a statistically significant increase in patient, provider and staff satisfaction was also noted when compared to the old scheduling system, as >68% of all patients, providers and staff reported feeling either very satisfied or extremely satisfied with the new scheduling system. Additionally, patients also reported that they were less likely to visit an emergency room(88%) or urgent care (90%) since they were able to be seen the same-day or the next-day by a provider.

Effects of changes: An incidental finding occurred during this study - where 877 more patients were seen in the three months during the implementation of this project, compared to the three months prior; which likely resulted in a 41% increase in revenue. Additionally this project, allowed patients that wanted to be seen on the same day, to be seen, and it decreased unnecessary costs associated with emergency room or urgent care visits. Some of the limitations involved included the current political environment, appointment slots that were previously 15 minutes in length (in 2016), increased to 20 minutes in length (in 2017), a language barrier was noted for the patient surveys since English was not the first language for many of the patients who completed the survey (although documents were translated), and the surveys used were not reliable instrument given that a reliable instrument in previous studies could not be found.

Lessons learnt: In order to have accuracy of the survey results, it is best for the author of the study to hand out and provide scripture for the survey so that complete data is received from the surveyors.

Messages for others: Begin by making a small process change where only one provider allows for the open-access scheduling so that the entire office is not affected by it, and if results begin to look promising then it can be expanded. Additionally, correct labeling of patients as 'same-day' is also important so that additional data can be gathered when needed regarding the 'same-day' patients.

Patient/Family/Guardian Involvement: Patients who benefited from the new scheduling system (open-access scheduling) were asked to fill out a survey that asked them to disclose some demographic data and asked them to determine their satisfaction with the new vs old scheduling system and their likelihood of visiting an emergency room or urgent care.

Ethics Approval: Arizona State University Institutional Review Board (IRB) Received: September 2017

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05-02

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Can You See Me? Primary Care Provider Education to Satisfy the Visually impaired

Description

Vision impairment has affected 2.2 billion people globally, with 12 million people affected in the United States; more than 700,000 Californians experience visual impairment or blindness (VI/B). Causes of VI/B

Vision impairment has affected 2.2 billion people globally, with 12 million people affected in the United States; more than 700,000 Californians experience visual impairment or blindness (VI/B). Causes of VI/B can be prevented with early identification and intervention. This project aims to identify perspectives of the VI/B, use this insight to build and improve the knowledge/skills of the primary care provider (PCP). A quantitative study, utilizing the Theory of Interpersonal Relations alongside the Star Model of Knowledge Transformation, incorporated pre-intervention questionnaires for the VI/B and the intention of pre- and post-intervention questionnaire for the PCP. After consenting, the VI/B completed the Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire-18 (α = 0.87) and Visual Functioning Questionnaire-25 (α = 0.95) surveys via telephone. An interventional video discussing visual acuity and screening, legal blindness versus visually impaired, leading causes of blindness, common ophthalmic drops and their side effects, helpful hints, and resources for the visually impaired was created. Deidentified results were analyzed with descriptive analysis and Pearson correlation. Currently, 30 voluntary, consented VI/B members have completed the pre-surveys. The overall average patient satisfaction score was 46.73 with financial aspect and communication with the most positive evaluation. Unfortunately, their PCPs have not responded. The PCP questionnaire will be distributed to the ophthalmologist partner’s healthcare organization. The needs of VI/B community are poorly identified and addressed in primary care; thus, the educational video was created to address the perceived gaps. Improved provider knowledge and enhanced patient care can enhance patient satisfaction with the delivery of care.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2021-04-29