Matching Items (22)
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ABSTRACT Recent studies indicate that top-performing companies have higher-performing work environments than average companies. They receive higher scores for worker satisfaction with their overall physical work environment as well as higher effectiveness ratings for their workspaces (Gensler, 2008; Harter et al., 2003). While these studies indicate a relationship between effective

ABSTRACT Recent studies indicate that top-performing companies have higher-performing work environments than average companies. They receive higher scores for worker satisfaction with their overall physical work environment as well as higher effectiveness ratings for their workspaces (Gensler, 2008; Harter et al., 2003). While these studies indicate a relationship between effective office design and satisfaction they have not explored which specific space types may contribute to workers' overall satisfaction with their physical work environment. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to explore the relationship between workers' overall satisfaction with their physical work environments and their perception of the effectiveness of spaces designed for Conceptual Age work including learning, focusing, collaborating, and socializing tasks. This research is designed to identify which workspace types are related to workers' satisfaction with their overall work environment and which are perceived to be most and least effective. To accomplish this two primary and four secondary research questions were developed for this study. The first primary question considers overall workers' satisfaction with their overall physical work environments (offices, workstations, hallways, common areas, reception, waiting areas, etc.) related to the effective use of work mode workspaces (learning, focusing, collaborating, socializing). The second primary research question was developed to identify which of the four work mode space types had the greatest and least relationship to workers' satisfaction with the overall physical work environment. Secondary research questions were developed to address workers' perceptions of effectiveness of each space type. This research project used data from a previous study collected from 2007 to 2012. Responses were from all staff levels of US office-based office workers and resulted in a blind sample of approximately 48,000 respondents. The data for this study were developed from SPSS data reports that included descriptive data and Pearson correlations. Findings were developed from those statistics using coefficient of determination.
ContributorsHarmon-Vaughan, Elizabeth (Author) / Kroelinger, Michael D. (Thesis advisor) / Bernardi, Jose (Committee member) / Ozel, Filiz (Committee member) / Arizona State University (Publisher)
Created2013
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ABSTRACT The present study examined the relationship between the experience of trauma during childhood (ages birth -12 years) and life satisfaction in adulthood (ages of 30-45) in a sample of convenience consisting of eight (8) adults, six (6) women and two (2) men, who volunteered to participate in this qualitative

ABSTRACT The present study examined the relationship between the experience of trauma during childhood (ages birth -12 years) and life satisfaction in adulthood (ages of 30-45) in a sample of convenience consisting of eight (8) adults, six (6) women and two (2) men, who volunteered to participate in this qualitative study, and self-identified as having experienced trauma between birth and age 12 years. Participants were asked to describe the trauma(s) they experienced in childhood and to discuss their thoughts and feelings about present circumstances in their lives, and how their lives have been impacted by the trauma they experienced. Data were collected via in-person interviews that were audio-taped and transcribed. The data were analyzed using a process of thematic coding. Nine (9) emotional themes were identified: aggression, anger, fear, frustration, helplessness, insecurity, irritability, loneliness and sadness. Participants reported a variety of traumas experienced, and their responses to difficult experiences were varied. Participants reported being impacted differently in eight domains of life that were examined in the study: mood related problems, self-care, social support, primary partner relationship, career, decision to have children, parenting and adult life satisfaction. All participants stated they had been impacted by early life trauma, and all stated that early-experienced trauma(s) had an impact on their life satisfaction in adulthood. Inter-coder reliability for emotional thematic codes and domains of life impacted by early trauma was .82.
ContributorsCrawford, Sarah (Author) / Moore, Elsie (Thesis advisor) / Stamm, Jill (Committee member) / Caterino, Linda (Committee member) / Arizona State University (Publisher)
Created2013
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It is hypothesized that procedural justice influences citizens' satisfaction with the police. An alternative argument holds that police performance measures, such as perceptions of crime and safety, are more salient. This study empirically investigates the predictive validity of both theoretical arguments. Using mail survey data from 563 adult residents from

It is hypothesized that procedural justice influences citizens' satisfaction with the police. An alternative argument holds that police performance measures, such as perceptions of crime and safety, are more salient. This study empirically investigates the predictive validity of both theoretical arguments. Using mail survey data from 563 adult residents from Monroe County, Michigan, a series of linear regression equations were estimated. The results suggest that procedural justice is a robust predictor of satisfaction with police. In contrast, several police performance measures failed to predict satisfaction with police. Overall, these findings support Tyler and Huo's (2002) contention that judgments regarding whether police exercise their authority in a procedurally-just fashion influence citizens' satisfaction with police more than fear of crime, perceptions of disorder, and the like.
ContributorsSmith, Stacey (Author) / Reisig, Michael D (Thesis advisor) / Ready, Justin (Committee member) / Holtfreter, Kristy (Committee member) / Arizona State University (Publisher)
Created2012
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Government performance and accountability have grown to be predominant areas within public administration literature over the last forty years. The research presented in this dissertation examines the relationship between citizen satisfaction and local government performance. Citizen review of service delivery provides vital feedback that facilitates better resource management within local

Government performance and accountability have grown to be predominant areas within public administration literature over the last forty years. The research presented in this dissertation examines the relationship between citizen satisfaction and local government performance. Citizen review of service delivery provides vital feedback that facilitates better resource management within local government. Using data from a single jurisdiction, two aspects of citizen satisfaction are reviewed. This includes citizen review of overall city performance, and citizen satisfaction with individual service delivery. Logit regression analysis is used to test several factors that affect citizen evaluation of service delivery in local government, while ordinary least squares regression is used to test the relationship between personal factors and citizen evaluation of specific local services. The results generated four major findings that contribute to the scholarly body of knowledge and local government knowledge application. First, citizens who are predisposed to supporting the local jurisdiction are more likely to rate service delivery high. Second, customer service is important. Third, those who experience government services similarly will collectively react similarly to the service experience. Finally, the length of residency has an impact on satisfaction levels with specific services. Implications for the literature as well as for practice are discussed.
ContributorsMcNamara, Catherine (Author) / Alozie, Nicholas O (Thesis advisor) / Cayer, Joseph (Thesis advisor) / Lucio, Joanna (Committee member) / Arizona State University (Publisher)
Created2012
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Automated planning problems classically involve finding a sequence of actions that transform an initial state to some state satisfying a conjunctive set of goals with no temporal constraints. But in many real-world problems, the best plan may involve satisfying only a subset of goals or missing defined goal deadlines. For

Automated planning problems classically involve finding a sequence of actions that transform an initial state to some state satisfying a conjunctive set of goals with no temporal constraints. But in many real-world problems, the best plan may involve satisfying only a subset of goals or missing defined goal deadlines. For example, this may be required when goals are logically conflicting, or when there are time or cost constraints such that achieving all goals on time may be too expensive. In this case, goals and deadlines must be declared as soft. I call these partial satisfaction planning (PSP) problems. In this work, I focus on particular types of PSP problems, where goals are given a quantitative value based on whether (or when) they are achieved. The objective is to find a plan with the best quality. A first challenge is in finding adequate goal representations that capture common types of goal achievement rewards and costs. One popular representation is to give a single reward on each goal of a planning problem. I further expand on this approach by allowing users to directly introduce utility dependencies, providing for changes of goal achievement reward directly based on the goals a plan achieves. After, I introduce time-dependent goal costs, where a plan incurs penalty if it will achieve a goal past a specified deadline. To solve PSP problems with goal utility dependencies, I look at using state-of-the-art methodologies currently employed for classical planning problems involving heuristic search. In doing so, one faces the challenge of simultaneously determining the best set of goals and plan to achieve them. This is complicated by utility dependencies defined by a user and cost dependencies within the plan. To address this, I introduce a set of heuristics based on combinations using relaxed plans and integer programming formulations. Further, I explore an approach to improve search through learning techniques by using automatically generated state features to find new states from which to search. Finally, the investigation into handling time-dependent goal costs leads us to an improved search technique derived from observations based on solving discretized approximations of cost functions.
ContributorsBenton, J (Author) / Kambhampati, Subbarao (Thesis advisor) / Baral, Chitta (Committee member) / Do, Minh B. (Committee member) / Smith, David E. (Committee member) / Langley, Pat (Committee member) / Arizona State University (Publisher)
Created2012
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Patients who attend genetic counseling appointments report high anxiety and varied satisfaction levels following their appointments. It has been suggested in previous literature that some of the increase in anxiety and reduction in satisfaction is caused by lack of prior information. Here, I investigated whether providing patients with a glossary

Patients who attend genetic counseling appointments report high anxiety and varied satisfaction levels following their appointments. It has been suggested in previous literature that some of the increase in anxiety and reduction in satisfaction is caused by lack of prior information. Here, I investigated whether providing patients with a glossary of genetic terms prior to their counseling appointment improves patient satisfaction and reduces anxiety in an oncology genetic counseling appointment. I surveyed 96 patients attending their first genetic counseling appointment at Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center and analyzed 92 patients for which I had complete data. Patients were randomly selected to receive one of two folders, containing either an educational document or an educational document and a glossary comprised of ten genetic terms. Each patient was given a post-counseling survey at the end of the counseling appointment to assess their anxiety and satisfaction levels. I did not observe a statistically significant difference in levels of anxiety or satisfaction, but the data are consistent with increased satisfaction for patients who received a glossary. Interesting, the data are also consistent with decreased anxiety levels for patients who did not receive a glossary. Furthermore, I did observe differences in reported satisfaction with patients who had college experience and patients that did not have any college experience.
ContributorsPeon, Lidia Maria (Author) / Wilson Sayres, Melissa A (Thesis advisor) / Buetow, Kenneth H (Committee member) / Luiten, Rebecca C (Committee member) / Siettmann, Jennifer M (Committee member) / Arizona State University (Publisher)
Created2018
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The purpose of this study was to research the effects of a student-staff mentoring relationship on high school students’ locus of control, life/school satisfaction and ultimately their academics as determined by their grades. Participants consisted of a small cohort of 10th grade high school students at a public charter,

The purpose of this study was to research the effects of a student-staff mentoring relationship on high school students’ locus of control, life/school satisfaction and ultimately their academics as determined by their grades. Participants consisted of a small cohort of 10th grade high school students at a public charter, college preparatory high school in inner city Phoenix, Arizona. Frederickson’s broaden-and-build theory of positive emotions and Bandura’s social cognitive theory provide the models of behavior to improve school satisfaction, motivation and overall well being. A mixed method, action research design was used to study how a 9-week mentoring program facilitated by the dean of students impacted the students’ locus of control, satisfaction, and academic achievement. Participants completed pre and post test measures using a modified Trice College Success Survey that measured external-internal locus of control and the Multidimensional Students’ Life Satisfaction Scale (MSLSS) used to measure life satisfaction and sub-constructs of satisfaction including family, friends, school, living environment and self. Post intervention a smaller sample of students were interviewed, field notes were also compiled and analyzed using a social constructionist point of view to gather insight on how students create their own knowledge and how that connects to their behaviors and attitudes that affect their success. Among the key findings was that students indicated a preference for the type of individualized attention that the mentoring program introduced to support them academically. Quantitative analyses of the survey data did not indicate a significant shift from external to internal locus of control or an improvement in life or school satisfaction, however further research should be conducted to implement a longer intervention period with similar intervention components.
ContributorsAlvarado Hernandez, Ruby Rebecca (Author) / Ott, Molly (Thesis advisor) / Hartley, Adam (Committee member) / Schauer, David (Committee member) / Arizona State University (Publisher)
Created2019
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Research on teamwork has shown that teams are more productive and produce better results than individuals working on their own. Yet, research on individuals' work preferences makes it clear that not everyone prefers working in teams. In order to improve teamwork and achieve better results in both the collegiate arena

Research on teamwork has shown that teams are more productive and produce better results than individuals working on their own. Yet, research on individuals' work preferences makes it clear that not everyone prefers working in teams. In order to improve teamwork and achieve better results in both the collegiate arena and in the professional world, this study was designed to research different factors that affect a group's performance and creativity: satisfaction, familiarity, and the behavioral styles of individual team members. Additionally, this study addresses if the group's composition of Keirsey types \u2014 temperament patterns \u2014 also play a role in the group's creativity and performance. In this study, students created teams of four to seven students and completed specific in-class activities called Applied Insights. Groups composed mostly of Guardians, one of the four Keirsey temperaments, are able to adapt to the task at hand, which is demonstrated here with creativity. Further, groups who perceive themselves as sharing similar traits with many members are more satisfied and achieve a higher overall performance. Lastly, groups comprised of individuals who were least familiar with their teammates they had not previously worked with, produced more creative results in the short run. Whereas groups comprised of individuals who were least familiar with their teammates they had previously worked with, produced better overall results in short run.
ContributorsPinto, Linda (Co-author) / Hulse, Christopher (Co-author) / Vaughn, Michael (Co-author) / LePine, Marcie (Thesis director) / Samper, Adriana (Committee member) / Barrett, The Honors College (Contributor) / WPC Graduate Programs (Contributor) / School of Accountancy (Contributor) / Department of Information Systems (Contributor) / Department of Marketing (Contributor) / School of Music (Contributor)
Created2014-12
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Engineering education has long sought to incorporate greater diversity into engineering programs to prepare the profession to meet the engineering challenges of society. Increasing or retaining the conative diversity of engineering programs may help extend other kinds of diversity in the profession as well (Marburger, 2004). One measure of conation

Engineering education has long sought to incorporate greater diversity into engineering programs to prepare the profession to meet the engineering challenges of society. Increasing or retaining the conative diversity of engineering programs may help extend other kinds of diversity in the profession as well (Marburger, 2004). One measure of conation is the Kolbe ATM index.
Kolbe ATM is an index developed by Kathy Kolbe to measure the conative traits on an individual. The index assigns each individual a value in four categories, or Action Modes, that indicates their level of insistence on a scale of 1 to 10 in that Action Mode (Kolbe, 2004). The four Action Modes are:

• Fact Finder – handling of information or facts
• Follow Thru – need to pattern or organize
• Quick Start – management of risk or uncertainty
• Implementor – interaction with space or tangibles

The Kolbe A (TM) index assigns each individual a value that indicates their level of insistence with 1-3 representing resistant, preventing problems in a particular Action Mode; 4-6 indicating accommodation, flexibility in a particular Action Mode; and 7-10 indicating insistence in an Action Mode, initiating solutions in that Action Mode (Kolbe, 2004).

To promote retention of conative diversity, this study examines conative diversity in two engineering student populations, a predominately freshmen population at Chandler Gilbert Community College and a predominately junior population at Arizona State University. Students in both population took a survey that asked them to self-report their GPA, satisfaction with required courses in their major, Kolbe ATM conative index, and how much their conative traits help them in each of the classes on the survey. The classes in the survey included two junior level classes at ASU, Engineering Business Practices and Structural Analysis; as well as four freshmen engineering classes, Physics Lecture, Physics Lab, English Composition, and Calculus I.

This study finds that student satisfaction has no meaningful correlation with student GPA.
The study also finds that engineering programs have a dearth of resistant Fact Finders from the freshmen level on and losses resistant Follow Thrus and insistent Quick Starts as time progresses. Students whose conative indices align well with the structure of the engineering program tend to consider their conative traits helpful to them in their engineering studies. Students whose conative indices misalign with the structure of the program report that they consider their strengths less helpful to them in their engineering studies.
This study recommends further research into the relationship between satisfaction with major and conation and into perceived helpfulness of conative traits by students. Educators should continue to use Kolbe A (TM) in the classroom and perform further research on the impacts of conation on diversity in engineering programs.
ContributorsSmith, Logan Farren (Author) / Seager, Thomas P. (Thesis director) / Adams, Elizabeth A. (Committee member) / Civil, Environmental and Sustainable Engineering Programs (Contributor) / Barrett, The Honors College (Contributor)
Created2015-05
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As a medical scribe working in an Emergency Department (ED) at Banner Gateway Medical Center (BGMC), the researcher was able to identify how the work flow and satisfaction of those in the ED would decrease when there were no Physician Assistants (PA's) being utilized during specific shifts. As for other

As a medical scribe working in an Emergency Department (ED) at Banner Gateway Medical Center (BGMC), the researcher was able to identify how the work flow and satisfaction of those in the ED would decrease when there were no Physician Assistants (PA's) being utilized during specific shifts. As for other shifts where PA's were on shift and were being utilized, the work flow would drastically increase, more patients would be seen in less time and the satisfaction of the researchers co-workers would increase. This paradigm of how PA's are implemented brought the researcher to understand the overall success of having Physicians Assistants in partnership with Physicians, consulting physicians and management in the ED. The researcher conducted a five-month long analyses of how implementation of Physician Assistants in the ED could effect overall satisfaction. The researcher looked at the satisfaction of the PAs themselves, attending physicians, nurses, nursing assistants, ED manager, ED director, ED co-director and the patients themselves. The researcher collected questionnaires, conducted interviews and retrieved data from Banner Health Services for the year 2014 to compare her data. The researcher conducted the study both at Banner Gateway Medical Center (BGMC) Emergency Department and also at Banner Baywood Medical Center (BBMC) ED. In comparison of the data collected from BGMC ED to BBMC ED resulted in a significant difference in overall satisfaction based on implementation. Although both emergency departments are owned by the same Banner corporation and only a few miles apart in distance, they implement Pas differently. The difference in the implementation did prove to effect the overall satisfaction. BGMC ED employees as well as manager and patients were more satisfied than those of BBMC ED. Some of the noted differences were that BBMC PAs see more patients per hour, they see higher acuity patients, are less compensated, are placed further apart from their attending physicians and other staff in the ED, there is minimal communication, PAs feel there voice is not heard and they feel pushback on feedback with no plan for improvement. BGMC PAs reported overall increase in satisfaction as compared to BBMC because of the increased communication, placement of PAs within the ED is closer to attending physicians and other staff, they see lower acuity patients, are better compensated and monthly meetings on improvements that can be made and the PAs feel their voice is being heard. Productivity scores for BGMC ED PAs were 1.71 patients per hour as compare to BBMC ED which was 1.86 patients per hour. BBMC PA patient satisfaction on average was 60.6 as compared to BGMC where the PA average satisfaction was 67.8.
ContributorsApplegate, Lauren Mckenzie (Author) / Kashiwagi, Dean (Thesis director) / Coursen, Cristi (Committee member) / Kashiwagi, Jacob (Committee member) / Barrett, The Honors College (Contributor) / School of Nutrition and Health Promotion (Contributor)
Created2015-05