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Confidentiality protection of user data and adaptive resource allocation for managing multiple workflow performance in service-based systems

Description

In this dissertation, two interrelated problems of service-based systems (SBS) are addressed: protecting users' data confidentiality from service providers, and managing performance of multiple workflows in SBS. Current SBSs pose serious limitations to protecting users' data confidentiality. Since users' sensitive

In this dissertation, two interrelated problems of service-based systems (SBS) are addressed: protecting users' data confidentiality from service providers, and managing performance of multiple workflows in SBS. Current SBSs pose serious limitations to protecting users' data confidentiality. Since users' sensitive data is sent in unencrypted forms to remote machines owned and operated by third-party service providers, there are risks of unauthorized use of the users' sensitive data by service providers. Although there are many techniques for protecting users' data from outside attackers, currently there is no effective way to protect users' sensitive data from service providers. In this dissertation, an approach is presented to protecting the confidentiality of users' data from service providers, and ensuring that service providers cannot collect users' confidential data while the data is processed or stored in cloud computing systems. The approach has four major features: (1) separation of software service providers and infrastructure service providers, (2) hiding the information of the owners of data, (3) data obfuscation, and (4) software module decomposition and distributed execution. Since the approach to protecting users' data confidentiality includes software module decomposition and distributed execution, it is very important to effectively allocate the resource of servers in SBS to each of the software module to manage the overall performance of workflows in SBS. An approach is presented to resource allocation for SBS to adaptively allocating the system resources of servers to their software modules in runtime in order to satisfy the performance requirements of multiple workflows in SBS. Experimental results show that the dynamic resource allocation approach can substantially increase the throughput of a SBS and the optimal resource allocation can be found in polynomial time

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2012

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Outsourcing of IT services: studies on diffusion and new theoretical perspectives

Description

Information technology (IT) outsourcing, including foreign or offshore outsourcing, has been steadily growing over the last two decades. This growth in IT outsourcing has led to the development of different hubs of services across nations, and has resulted in increased

Information technology (IT) outsourcing, including foreign or offshore outsourcing, has been steadily growing over the last two decades. This growth in IT outsourcing has led to the development of different hubs of services across nations, and has resulted in increased competition among service providers. Firms have been using IT outsourcing to not only leverage advanced technologies and services at lower costs, but also to maintain their competitive edge and grow. Furthermore, as prior studies have shown, there are systematic differences among industries in terms of the degree and impact of IT outsourcing. This dissertation uses a three-study approach to investigate issues related to IT outsourcing at the macro and micro levels, and provides different perspectives for understanding the issues associated with IT outsourcing at a firm and industry level. The first study evaluates the diffusion patterns of IT outsourcing across industries at aggregate level and within industries at a firm level. In addition, it analyzes the factors that influence the diffusion of IT outsourcing and tests models that help us understand the rate and patterns of diffusion at the industry level. This study establishes the presence of hierarchical contagion effects in the diffusion of IT outsourcing. The second study explores the role of location and proximity of industries to understand the diffusion patterns of IT outsourcing within clusters using the spatial analysis technique of space-time clustering. It establishes the presence of simultaneous space and time interactions at the global level in the diffusion of IT outsourcing. The third study examines the development of specialized hubs for IT outsourcing services in four developing economies: Brazil, Russia, India, and China (BRIC). In this study, I adopt a theory-building approach involving the identification of explanatory anomalies, and propose a new hybrid theory called- knowledge network theory. The proposed theory suggests that the growth and development of the IT and related services sector is a result of close interactions among adaptive institutions. It is also based on new knowledge that is created, and which flows through a country's national diaspora of expatriate entrepreneurs, technologists and business leaders. In addition, relevant economic history and regional geography factors are important. This view diverges from the traditional view, wherein effective institutions are considered to be the key determinants of long-term economic growth.

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Created

Date Created
2012

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Understanding the determinants of success in mobile apps markets

Description

Mobile applications (Apps) markets with App stores have introduced a new approach to define and sell software applications with access to a large body of heterogeneous consumer population. Several distinctive features of mobile App store markets including – (a) highly

Mobile applications (Apps) markets with App stores have introduced a new approach to define and sell software applications with access to a large body of heterogeneous consumer population. Several distinctive features of mobile App store markets including – (a) highly heterogeneous consumer preferences and values, (b) high consumer cognitive burden of searching a large selection of similar Apps, and (c) continuously updateable product features and price – present a unique opportunity for IS researchers to investigate theoretically motivated research questions in this area. The aim of this dissertation research is to investigate the key determinants of mobile Apps success in App store markets. The dissertation is organized into three distinct and related studies. First, using the key tenets of product portfolio management theory and theory of economies of scope, this study empirically investigates how sellers’ App portfolio strategies are associated with sales performance over time. Second, the sale performance impacts of App product cues, generated from App product descriptions and offered from market formats, are examined using the theories of market signaling and cue utilization. Third, the role of App updates in stimulating consumer demands in the presence of strong ranking effects is appraised. The findings of this dissertation work highlight the impacts of sellers’ App assortment, strategic product description formulation, and long-term App management with price/feature updates on success in App market. The dissertation studies make key contributions to the IS literature by highlighting three key managerially and theoretically important findings related to mobile Apps: (1) diversification across selling categories is a key driver of high survival probability in the top charts, (2) product cues strategically presented in the descriptions have complementary relationships with market cues in influencing App sales, and (3) continuous quality improvements have long-term effects on App success in the presence of strong ranking effects.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2015

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Consumption in the age of digital plenty: three essays into an emerging phenomenon

Description

The recent changes in the software markets gave users an unprecedented number

of alternatives for any given task. In such a competitive environment, it is imperative

to understand what drives user behavior. To that end, the research presented in

this dissertation, tries to

The recent changes in the software markets gave users an unprecedented number

of alternatives for any given task. In such a competitive environment, it is imperative

to understand what drives user behavior. To that end, the research presented in

this dissertation, tries to uncover the impact of business strategies often used in the

software markets.

The dissertation is organized into three distinct studies into user choice and post

choice use of software. First using social judgment theory as foundation, zero price

strategies effects on user choice is investigated, with respect to product features,

consumer characteristics, and context effects. Second, role of social features in

moderating network effects on user choice is studied. And finally, the role of social

features on the effectiveness of add-on content strategy on continued user engagement

is investigated.

The findings of this dissertation highlight the alignments between popular business

strategies and broad software context. The dissertation contributes to the litera-

ture by uncovering hitherto overlooked complementarities between business strategy

and product features: (1) zero price strategy enhances utilitarian features but not

non-utilitarian features in software choice, (2) social features only enhance network

externalities but not social influence in user choice, (3) social features enhance the

effect of add-on content strategy in extending software engagement.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2016

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Online Platform Policy and User Engagement

Description

Various activities move online in the era of the digital economy. Platform design and policy can heavily affect online user activities and result in many expected and unexpected consequences. In this dissertation, I conduct empirical studies on three types of

Various activities move online in the era of the digital economy. Platform design and policy can heavily affect online user activities and result in many expected and unexpected consequences. In this dissertation, I conduct empirical studies on three types of online platforms to investigate the influence of their platform policy on their user engagement and associated outcomes. Specifically, in Study 1, I focus on goal-directed platforms and study how the introduction of the mobile channel affects users’ goal pursuit engagement and persistence. In Study 2, I focus on social media and online communities. I study the introduction of machine-powered platform regulation and its impacts on volunteer moderators’ engagement. In Study 3, I focus on online political discourse forums and examine the role of identity declaration in user participation and polarization in the subsequent political discourse. Overall, my results highlight how various platform policies shape user behavior. Implications on multi-channel adoption, human-machine collaborative platform governance, and online political polarization research are discussed.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2021