Matching Items (9)

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Organizational Culture: Leadership, Values, and Communication

Description

This work aims to provide a review of the literature on the concept of organizational culture, and apply that knowledge to four companies: Salesforce, Adobe, Facebook, and Twitter. Organizational culture

This work aims to provide a review of the literature on the concept of organizational culture, and apply that knowledge to four companies: Salesforce, Adobe, Facebook, and Twitter. Organizational culture is the shared learning any group goes through over time that guides future thoughts and behaviors. Culture can be influenced and created by leaders in specific ways, as well as by the members of the organization in how they communicate and behave with each other. The focus of this thesis is to analyze recent earnings calls for the values communicated by CEOs of the companies in question. The earnings calls were conducted by the companies, and in them, senior leaders inform shareholders and analysts on financial updates and other pertinent information about the performance of the company. Those four companies were chosen because they are popularly known to have effective and successful cultures. By understanding the foundation of organizational culture and how it might apply to such companies, people who are interested in the concept of organizational culture, and leaders in particular, may stand to learn of an aspect of business where an untapped advantage can be gained.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

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The Customer is Always Right: Why Commitment to Service is Key to Positive Brand Image, Customer Loyalty, and Organizational Success

Description

This study examines how a commitment to service can impact and come to exemplify a company’s brand image, customer loyalty, and overall organizational success. It examines the history and evolution

This study examines how a commitment to service can impact and come to exemplify a company’s brand image, customer loyalty, and overall organizational success. It examines the history and evolution of customer service, as well as what commitment to service looks like in present-day businesses. It differentiates companies that have attained a reputation for superior service and companies that have struggled to overcome service failures. Trader Joe’s, The Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company, Chick-fil-A, Southwest Airlines, and The Walt Disney Company are identified as five companies that have attained a reputation for remarkable service. This study includes five analyses to understand each company’s mission, history, leadership, employee engagement, and organizational culture. This study synthesizes how an unwavering commitment to customers, emphasis on employee empowerment, and ability to embed service in culture are common themes that can significantly contribute to a company’s ability to develop a reputation for remarkable service.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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Mentorship Matters: Understanding the Impact of Mentorship for Advanced Practice Providers

Description

Nurse practitioners and physician assistants, collectively termed advanced practice providers (APPs), report a lack of onboarding and professional support which has been shown to lead to job dissatisfaction, high turnover

Nurse practitioners and physician assistants, collectively termed advanced practice providers (APPs), report a lack of onboarding and professional support which has been shown to lead to job dissatisfaction, high turnover rates, professional attrition, and gaps in patient care; wasting billions of healthcare dollars and falling short of the Quadruple Aim. A time-honored, integral means of support in many industries is mentorship. This is a dynamic, evolving relationship between an experienced professional and a novice professional that promotes knowledge application, systems navigation, organizational socialization and personal role integration.

Unfortunately, healthcare organizations have been slow to adopt mentorship, as evidenced by the paucity of studies on mentorship programs in health care, and APP turnover rates twice that of physicians. This evidenced-based project expands on the limited existing studies regarding the associations between mentorship and organizational commitment, as well as explores the desired characteristics of quality mentors and perceived barriers to APP mentorship.

A survey of multispecialty APPs at an oncology practice within a larger, multi-state integrated healthcare delivery system reveals access to mentors and time are the biggest barriers. The most desired mentorship characteristics are professional knowledge and motivational support. Career development through mentorship can increase job satisfaction and retention, as well as improve the quality of care provided by APPs. By strengthening the professional foundations, patients will benefit with continuity of care, improved quality measures, and efficient systems communication reaching the Quadruple Aim targets.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-04-30

Professional Improvisation Workshop

Description

The first thought that comes to mind for most people when they hear of improvisation is most likely the memory of a funny performance seen on television shows such as

The first thought that comes to mind for most people when they hear of improvisation is most likely the memory of a funny performance seen on television shows such as Who’s Line is it Anyway? or perhaps the opportunity to be an audience member for a live improv troupe performance. In either of these settings, improvisation can be hilarious, dramatic and entertaining and it makes you wonder how people could possibly be making these scenes up on the spot. Unfortunately, not everyone has first-hand experience with the creative, team-building “magic” of improvisation games and exercises. Watching professional improvisation perform can be intimidating to an observer who hopes to one day be an improvisor themselves. Because of this, the immense benefits that improvisation can have within a professional workplace are often overlooked or ignored. I, myself, never had any experience with improvisation or being on stage until the second semester of my sophomore year when I made the choice to try out for ASU comedy.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

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An Examination of the Organizational Culture and Profitability of Disney World: The Unique Perspectives of Disney Interns

Description

This research examines the relationship between the famed organizational culture of Disney as a company and the profitability of Walt Disney World itself. There are several factors of the organizational

This research examines the relationship between the famed organizational culture of Disney as a company and the profitability of Walt Disney World itself. There are several factors of the organizational culture within the employees or “cast members” of Walt Disney World that have become the reason Disney itself is so profitable. Those factors have included the training that every cast member must go through, knowledge of the company and the park alike and the positive treatment and benefits given to the cast members by upper management. The training of the cast members is known to establish high levels of trust and respect among the Disney organization and its guests, which can lead to a positive relationship and a long-term customer. The research in this study is to determine whether the organizational culture and the quality of the employees are what causes a Walt Disney World guest to become a customer and that has kept the profitability so high. The research discovered that Walt Disney World leadership has put too much of a focus on making profits. This pressure to make sales has caused organizational culture to become negative and motivation for cast members to sell to drop, causing more pressure from leadership to make sales.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

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Applying the Ecological Systems Theory to a Child Welfare Agency: Examining the Association Between Organizational Culture and Climate and Individual Level Factors

Description

ABSTRACT

The child welfare workforce is charged with the demanding work of ensuring the safety, well-being, and permanency of maltreated children. Although child welfare work can be rewarding, it is

ABSTRACT

The child welfare workforce is charged with the demanding work of ensuring the safety, well-being, and permanency of maltreated children. Although child welfare work can be rewarding, it is also associated with high levels of stress and burnout, causing challenges to retain staff. Developing organizational cultures and climates within child welfare agencies that are supportive of the workforce and strive to improve outcomes is essential. Applying the ecological systems theory to a child welfare agency provides for an understanding that the agency is comprised of different levels of systems with interactions between the systems. This study examined the association between the individual level factors of job satisfaction, coping skills, self-efficacy, burnout, job stress, and individual affect with organizational level factors including culture and climate. Child welfare workers from one regional area were invited to participate in an online survey utilizing the Comprehensive Organizational Health Assessment and the Positive and Negative Affect Scale. Results indicate that there is an association between each of the individual level factors and the organizational factors. The importance of the role of individual affect was highlighted in the results in that the level of affect reported was associated with corresponding ratings of the perception of the organizational culture and climate. These results provide implications for hiring, training, mentoring, and supervision. This study attempted to assess if the organizational culture and climate of individual child welfare units could be linked to permanency outcomes. This linkage was not possible in this study, however implications to conduct this type of research are made. Advancing the study of organizational culture and climate beyond the impact of such factors as job satisfaction and retention to linking to direct client outcomes is an emerging and important field of research.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017

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Uncovering relationships between sustainable business practice bundles, organizational culture, and performance

Description

Corporations work to reduce their negative impacts on the environment and society by adopting Sustainable business (SB) practices. Businesses create competitive advantages via practices such as waste minimization, green

Corporations work to reduce their negative impacts on the environment and society by adopting Sustainable business (SB) practices. Businesses create competitive advantages via practices such as waste minimization, green product design, compliance with regulations, and stakeholder relations. Normative models indicate that businesses should adopt similar sustainability practices, however, contingency theory suggests that effectiveness of practices depends on the context of the business. The literature highlights the importance of organizational culture as a moderating variable between SB practices and outcomes, however this link has not been empirically examined. This thesis presents the development and testing of a theoretical model, using configuration theory, that links SB practices, organizational culture, and financial performance.

Published frameworks were utilized to identify SB practices in use, and the Competing Values Framework (CVF) to identify dimensions of culture. Data from 1021 Corporate Sustainability Reports from 212 companies worldwide was collected for computerized text analysis, which provided a measure of the occurrence of a specific SB practice and the four dimensions of the CVF. Hypotheses were analyzed using cluster, crosstab, and t-test statistical methods.

The findings contribute significant insights to the Business and Sustainability field. Firstly, clustering of SB practice bundles identified organizations at various levels of SB practice awareness. The spectrum runs from a compliance level of awareness, to a set of organizations aware of the importance of culture change for sustainability. Top performing clusters demonstrated different priorities with regards to SB practices; these were in many cases, related to contextual factors, such as location or sector. This implies that these organizations undertook varying sustainability strategies, but all arrived at some successful level of sustainability. Another key finding was the association between the highest performing SB practice clusters and a culture dominated by Adhocracy values, corroborating theories presented in the literature, but were not empirically tested before.

The results of this research offer insights into the use of text analysis to study SB practices and organizational culture. Further, this study presents a novel attempt at empirically testing the relationship between SB practices and culture, and tying this to financial performance. The goal is that this work serves as an initial step in redefining the way in which businesses adopt SB practices. A transformation of SB practice adoption will lead to major improvements in sustainability strategies, and subsequently drive change for improved corporate sustainability.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017

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Leadership and organizational culture: an integrative view of leaders as culture creators and culture as social context

Description

Despite the vast amount of research within the leadership and culture domains, a paucity of research has integrated the two literatures. This dissertation investigates leadership, organizational culture, and the dynamic

Despite the vast amount of research within the leadership and culture domains, a paucity of research has integrated the two literatures. This dissertation investigates leadership, organizational culture, and the dynamic interplay between them. It is composed of three papers with the objective to integrate leadership and culture research, theoretically and empirically, and generate novel insights about both phenomena. Paper 1 describes how leader-unit interactions foster culture emergence. I integrate insights from social learning theory, self-regulation theory, and event-structure theory to enumerate how leader-unit interactions create values, beliefs, and underlying assumptions that become shared among members in a nascent work unit. Paper 2 integrates team motivation theory with multilevel leadership theory to address CEO task leadership's paradoxical effect on firm performance through intervening social (i.e., organizational culture) and psychological (i.e., TMT engagement) mechanisms. Using data from 106 CEOs and 324 top management team members, structural equation modeling results revealed that CEO task leadership enhanced firm performance through its positive association with task culture, which in turn was positively related to TMT engagement, which positively contributed to firm performance. Conversely, CEO task leadership hindered firm performance through its negative, direct effect on TMT engagement. Paper 3 integrates various approaches to organizational culture bandwidth that have produced a fragmented view of culture and its effects on organizational outcomes. I draw upon organizational culture theory and bandwidth theory to examine the incremental predictive validity of culture configurations and culture dimensions on broad and narrow criteria. Hierarchical linear regression analyses, from data consisting of 567 employees in 130 bank branches, indicated that narrow culture dimensions predicted variance in narrow outcomes whereas configurations explained incremental variance in broad outcomes above and beyond culture dimensions. Through this dissertation, I take an initial step toward illuminating the interrelationship between leadership and culture by identifying mechanisms through which unit leaders foster culture emergence and by examining how organizational culture is a social normative lens through which followers filter leader behavior. Given culture's importance to leadership and organizational outcomes, the conditions in which culture should be examined as a broad or a narrow phenomenon are also enumerated.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2012

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Leadership, hermandad (brother/sisterhood), and organizational culture: crossing boundaries to build collaborative relationships among Latino fraternal organizations

Description

The purpose of the study is to explore the identity development and organizational culture of a student organization, the National Association of Latino Fraternal Organizations council (NALFO) by implementing a

The purpose of the study is to explore the identity development and organizational culture of a student organization, the National Association of Latino Fraternal Organizations council (NALFO) by implementing a community of practice approach at a large, public university in southwestern United States. The objective is to construct a sustainable camaraderie among the existing Latino fraternal organizations at the university to influence leadership development, work toward a common vision, and a cohesive and systematic approach to collaboration, consequently transforming organizational culture. This study investigates the factors that contribute to and/or inhibit increased communication and collaboration and to describe the experiences of Latino fraternal members who are purposefully engaged in a community of practice. There are 57 fraternal organizations in five umbrella councils at the university, including predominately Caucasian, historically African American, Latino, and Multicultural groups, whose platforms are commonly leadership, scholarship, and philanthropy. This action research examines the experiences of six NALFO members individually and working as a community with the guidance of a mentor (the researcher). The researcher employs use of an anonymous initial and post electronic survey, a participant personal statement, an intentional and purposeful community of practice, a semi-structured individual interview, and focus groups to collect data. Findings suggest that length of membership and fraternal experience influence participant responses; however, the themes remain consistent. Building relationships, perception (by members and outsiders), identity development, organizational management, and challenging perspectives (from outside influences) are factors that influence the organizational culture of the organization. On the post electronic survey all participants indicate that the implementation of an intentional community of practice can benefit the organization by encouraging participation and increasing communication. While participants suggest activities for encouraging member engagement, they determine that actual participation would be dependent on individual motivation.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2013