Matching Items (4)

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Feasibility of The Mindfulness Meditation App “Calm” to Reduce Burnout in Physician Assistant Students

Description

Objectives: To explore the feasibility and effects of using a meditation mobile app 10-minutes a day for 4-weeks to reduce burnout (primary outcome), improve mindfulness, reduce stress, and depression in

Objectives: To explore the feasibility and effects of using a meditation mobile app 10-minutes a day for 4-weeks to reduce burnout (primary outcome), improve mindfulness, reduce stress, and depression in physician assistant (PA) students compared to a wait-list control.
Methods: This study was a randomized, wait-list, control trial with assessments at baseline and post-intervention (week 4). Participants were asked to meditate using Calm for 10 minutes per day. A p value ≤0.05 was considered statistically significant.
Results: The majority of participants (n=19) stated using Calm helped them cope with the stress of PA school. The intervention group participated in meditation for an average of 76 minutes/week. There were significant differences in all outcomes for the intervention group (all p ≤0.06). There was a significant interaction between group and time factors in emotional exhaustion (p=.016) and depersonalization (p=.025).
Conclusions: Calm is a feasible way to reduce burnout in PA students. Our findings provide information that can be applied to the design of future studies.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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Supporting Advanced Practice Provider Transition to Practice: A Theoretical and Evidence-Based Intervention

Description

New graduate nurse practitioners and physician assistants, also known as advanced practice providers (APPs), face a significant number of challenges when entering professional practice. If the new graduate does not

New graduate nurse practitioners and physician assistants, also known as advanced practice providers (APPs), face a significant number of challenges when entering professional practice. If the new graduate does not receive sufficient guidance and support during this transition to practice (TTP), they will likely experience significant psychological stress and anxiety. If an organization does not implement measures to address TTP, the new graduate is much more likely to leave the current position within the first two years of practice.

An extensive literature review was conducted investigating the effects, and necessary components of an orientation program which supports the new graduate through TTP. Using Van Maanen & Schein’s (1979) Theory of Organizational Socialization, a comprehensive new graduate orientation program was designed and implemented in large multi-specialty practice. Initial results suggest that this program improves both the perceived organizational support felt by the new graduate, as well as the new graduates’ affective commitment to the organization. Improvements in both these dimensions have been shown to decrease turnover intention and increase retention of the employee.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-04-29

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Mentorship Matters: Understanding the Impact of Mentorship for Advanced Practice Providers

Description

Nurse practitioners and physician assistants, collectively termed advanced practice providers (APPs), report a lack of onboarding and professional support which has been shown to lead to job dissatisfaction, high turnover

Nurse practitioners and physician assistants, collectively termed advanced practice providers (APPs), report a lack of onboarding and professional support which has been shown to lead to job dissatisfaction, high turnover rates, professional attrition, and gaps in patient care; wasting billions of healthcare dollars and falling short of the Quadruple Aim. A time-honored, integral means of support in many industries is mentorship. This is a dynamic, evolving relationship between an experienced professional and a novice professional that promotes knowledge application, systems navigation, organizational socialization and personal role integration.

Unfortunately, healthcare organizations have been slow to adopt mentorship, as evidenced by the paucity of studies on mentorship programs in health care, and APP turnover rates twice that of physicians. This evidenced-based project expands on the limited existing studies regarding the associations between mentorship and organizational commitment, as well as explores the desired characteristics of quality mentors and perceived barriers to APP mentorship.

A survey of multispecialty APPs at an oncology practice within a larger, multi-state integrated healthcare delivery system reveals access to mentors and time are the biggest barriers. The most desired mentorship characteristics are professional knowledge and motivational support. Career development through mentorship can increase job satisfaction and retention, as well as improve the quality of care provided by APPs. By strengthening the professional foundations, patients will benefit with continuity of care, improved quality measures, and efficient systems communication reaching the Quadruple Aim targets.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-04-30

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How PA Programs Successfully Promote Diversity in Admissions

Description

More underrepresented minority (URM) healthcare professionals are needed to improve health equity. Although holistic review in admissions has the potential to increase URM participation in health professions, recent data suggest

More underrepresented minority (URM) healthcare professionals are needed to improve health equity. Although holistic review in admissions has the potential to increase URM participation in health professions, recent data suggest that its impact varies substantially. The purpose of the dissertation research described here was to identify interventions to increase diversity among healthcare professionals and explore holistic review use in physician assistant (PA) program admissions to advance understanding of effective practices. PA programs were selected as an important prototype for exploratory studies since the extent of holistic review use in PA programs was unknown; at the same time, URM representation among PA students has decreased over the last 15 years.

A critical review of the literature revealed that various holistic review practices have been used by several health professions programs to successfully increase URM enrollment and that organizational culture may be a factor that promotes success. Following this, 2017 Physician Assistant Education Association survey data were analyzed to assess the frequency of holistic review in PA programs and examine its association with URM matriculation. Results from 221 of the 223 PA programs accredited at the time showed that 77.5% used holistic review, and its use modestly correlated with proportion of first-year students identified as ethnic minorities (rs = .20, p < .01). Of particular interest, some programs using holistic review had substantially higher proportions of URM students than others. This finding laid the foundation for a qualitative multiple case study to explore the role of organizational culture as a hypothesized antecedent to effective holistic admissions processes.

Survey study responses were used to select two PA program ‘cases’ that met criteria consistent with a proposed conceptual framework linking organizational culture that values diversity (or ‘diversity culture’) to holistic admissions associated with high URM enrollment. Directed content analysis of data revealed that diversity culture appears to be a strong driver of practices that support enrolling diverse classes of students.

Overall, this mixed methods program of research advances understanding of holistic review, its utility, and the influence of organizational culture. The research generated important insights with ramifications for current practice and future studies within PA and across health professions programs.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019