Matching Items (2)

Filtering by

Clear all filters

137191-Thumbnail Image.png

Faith Based College Counseling - A Business Plan

Description

The focus of this project is developing a business plan for faith-based counseling for college students. Renewed Living Counseling Center (RLCC) is a faith-based counseling center in the Tempe area serving Arizona State University students. RLCC strives to bring healing

The focus of this project is developing a business plan for faith-based counseling for college students. Renewed Living Counseling Center (RLCC) is a faith-based counseling center in the Tempe area serving Arizona State University students. RLCC strives to bring healing and wholeness to each student who comes through the doors, to empower them to realize and live out their potential, by providing them with the skills to accomplish their dreams and live full lives, through counseling, motivation, education, and treating studentʼs behaviors to become whole and successful. Research indicates that the proposed center, Renewed Living Counseling Center (RLCC), has great potential for success because:

1. Spirituality and faith are increasingly recognized as important aspects in a personʼs life. National research shows that 66% of people feel counseling should include spirituality. Research with ASU students found that students reflect this statistic, as they feel spirituality is an important part of counseling. Students also feel spirituality is appropriate to include as part of counseling services offered by centers referred to by ASU.

2. There is a need for counseling at ASU. Nationally,approximately1,100 college students commit suicide each year. At ASU, almost one-third of students reported feeling so depressed that it is difficult to function, and 0.9% report having attempted suicide within the past year.

3. Surveys of ASU students indicate that students who describe themselves as being religious are more desirous that counseling include a spiritual dimension. Surveys of campus pastors indicate that over 80% believe there is a need for faith-based counseling and would refer students to a local center.

4. Price is an issue. Indeed, a survey of campus pastors indicated that they believed cost of counseling to be one of the primary deterrents to students seeking help. One way to control costs is to use a mixture of residents and licensed counselors. As in medicine, students must complete coursework along with a period of residency or internship to obtain licensing. Both religious and secular masters programs in counseling exist in the greater Phoenix area. Thus, there is a potential supply of students who could work as residents, permitting RLCC to offer counseling services at reasonable prices.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2014-05

149593-Thumbnail Image.png

Physical activity counseling knowledge, attitudes, and practices among nurse practitioners and physician assistants

Description

Health care providers (HCPs) are an important source of physical activity (PA) information. Two studies were conducted to qualitatively and quantitatively examine nurse practitioners'(NPs) and physician assistants' current PA counseling practices, knowledge and confidence to provide PA counseling and providers'

Health care providers (HCPs) are an important source of physical activity (PA) information. Two studies were conducted to qualitatively and quantitatively examine nurse practitioners'(NPs) and physician assistants' current PA counseling practices, knowledge and confidence to provide PA counseling and providers' perceptions about their current PA counseling practices. The specific aims for these two studies included quantitatively and qualitatively identifying the prevalence of PA counseling, perceived counseling knowledge and confidence, and educational training related to counseling. In study 1, survey respondents were currently practicing NPs and physician assistants. Participants completed a modified version of the Promotion of Physical Activity by Nurse Practitioners Questionnaire either online or in person during a population specific conference. The majority of both NP and physician assistant respondents reported routinely counseling patients about PA. There were no differences in perceived knowledge or confidence to provide PA counseling between the two populations. Approximately half of all respondents reported receiving training to provide PA counseling as part of their educational preparation for becoming a health practitioner. Nearly three-quarters of respondents reported interest in receiving additional PA counseling training. In study 2, five focus groups (FGs), stratified by practice type, were conducted with NPs and physician assistants. Both NPs and physician assistants reported discussing PA with their patients, particularly those with chronic illness. Participants reported that discussing lifestyle modifications with patients was the most common type of PA counseling provided. Increased confidence to counsel was associated with having PA knowledge and providing simple counseling, such as lifestyle modifications. Barriers to counseling included having more important things to discuss, lack of time during appointments, the current healthcare system, lack of reimbursement and perceived patient financial barriers. PA recommendation knowledge was highly variable, with few participants reporting specific guidelines. FG participants, while not familiar with the American College of Sports Medicines' "Exercise is Medicine" initiative indicated interest in its use and learning more about it. The findings of these two studies indicate that while NPs and physician assistants are knowledgeable, confident and currently providing some amount of PA counseling to patients, additional training in PA counseling is needed and desired.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2011