Matching Items (18)

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Obesity in Adults on Antidepressant Therapy

Description

In the United States obesity continues to be a growing issue in the adult population, which is compounded by the fact that many people have had antidepressant therapy at some

In the United States obesity continues to be a growing issue in the adult population, which is compounded by the fact that many people have had antidepressant therapy at some point in their lives. Health problems such as metabolic syndrome, diabetes, skeleton/joint issues and more can stem from obesity. These comorbid health care problems can increase the costs at the state and federal levels. This paper will examine obesity and its relation to antidepressant therapy in depressed adults that are obese or endeavoring to avoid further weight gain. Research indicates that antidepressant therapies have shown a greater propensity towards weight gain, though few research studies show weight loss.

Intervention: 10 minutes of nutritional counseling during office visits. Setting: Family psychiatric clinic in the southwest of the United States.

Methods: Data collection process: Depressed adults on antidepressant therapies were randomly selected.

Instrumentation: Weight scale, National Literacy Scale, pamphlet (for teaching) and height scale. Data collected was at baseline, 4 weeks and 8 weeks.

Outcomes: 14 Participants agreed to the project, 10 completed to the 4-week mark and 4 finished the project to the 8-week mark. 10 female participants and 4 male participants. The remaining 4 participants showed 1.6% reduction in body mass index, which correlated with an increase in nutritional learning from baseline to 8-weeks.

Recommendations: Nutritional counseling is a non-pharmacological intervention for achieving and a desired weight, which has shown positive results in varying populations and clinical situations.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05-07

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Student Efficacy for Skill Mastery in Counseling Children: A Service Learning Model

Description

Literature surrounding counselor education supports a constructivist pedagogical perspective and experiential models of counselor training. The purpose of this study is to analyze the experiential component of a 15-week service-learning

Literature surrounding counselor education supports a constructivist pedagogical perspective and experiential models of counselor training. The purpose of this study is to analyze the experiential component of a 15-week service-learning play therapy course, in which six Master of Counseling graduate students simultaneously learned the therapeutic process of play therapy and practiced directive and non-directive skills with children at a local elementary school. At the end of the course, each student submitted a critical incident report describing one experience that occurred during the course that significantly impacted their skill development and mastery. A thematic analysis was conducted using these critical incident reports to assess the impact of the course on the counselors-in-training learning process and outcomes. Five themes were identified in this thematic analysis: use of therapeutic orientations, children's navigation of the counseling process, challenges of navigating new counseling experiences, acknowledgement of children's knowledge/ability to solve their own problems, and unpredictability of sessions. The findings of this study highlight the value of a child-centered therapeutic approach and the need for experiential learning opportunities specifically related to counseling children. Lastly, limitations and implications for future research are discussed.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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The Human Geode Project: An Inside Look At Suicide Loss Survivors

Description

The loss of a loved one through suicide is a traumatic life event that brings about considerable emotional turmoil. In the present study, the term suicide loss survivor refers to

The loss of a loved one through suicide is a traumatic life event that brings about considerable emotional turmoil. In the present study, the term suicide loss survivor refers to an individual who is a family member or a friend of a person who died by suicide. Through the three chosen methods of gathering data, which are online surveys, in person interviews, and photography sessions, researchers highlight the personal experience of thirty-three suicide loss survivors. Supported by these various methods of data collection are the unique issues that accompany the bereavement of a suicide loss. The areas of focus are the emotional trauma, social stigma, and postvention resources utilized or made available to suicide loss survivors. Throughout interviews with suicide loss survivors, some of whom also identified as Arizona State University students, an additional opportunity for research emerged. Participants identified that Arizona State University is not effectively providing suicide awareness and prevention materials and training to its community, including staff and students. Recommendations for how Arizona State University can improve their current processes are discussed in the conclusion. By implementing the recommendations of prevention and postvention care, it is possible to educate students and staff and, in turn, allow Arizona State University to foster a culture of empathy for existing suicide loss survivors, while working on decreasing the risk of future suicides. This creative project and narrative analysis was performed by two individuals who themselves are suicide loss survivors and have taken their personal experiences as a foundation for the project's need.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

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International Student-American Counselor Dyadic Relationships

Description

Over the last few decades the number of international students in the U.S. has increased considerably. According to Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS) statistics, the number of international

Over the last few decades the number of international students in the U.S. has increased considerably. According to Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS) statistics, the number of international students reached 1.18 million as of May 2017 (Smith, 2017). Whereas both first year international and domestic students experience difficulties associated with their status as university students, international students appear to be more vulnerable to experience psychological distress, as compared to their domestic peers (Edmond, 1997). Research has shown, that international students report higher levels of stress related to social difficulty as opposed to domestic students (Edmond, 1997). Given these patterns, it is not surprising that international students entering U.S. universities may be more likely to seek and receive counseling services than before. A study conducted with students, both international and domestic, compared trends from 2004 to 2006 of students utilizing counseling services; results revealed a 10 percent increase in international students' utilization of counseling services. (Cheng, Mallinckrodt, Soet, & Sevig, 2010). Such increase in the number of international students seeking counseling services appears to necessitate current and future practitioners to be well-equipped to work with this unique and diverse client population of international students. The goal of this study is to explore the experience of two current day American counselors working with international students using grounded theory of analysis to analyze the transcriptions of semi-structured interviews and to ultimately inform current and future practice in the treatment of international students undergoing counseling

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Faith Based College Counseling - A Business Plan

Description

The focus of this project is developing a business plan for faith-based counseling for college students. Renewed Living Counseling Center (RLCC) is a faith-based counseling center in the Tempe area

The focus of this project is developing a business plan for faith-based counseling for college students. Renewed Living Counseling Center (RLCC) is a faith-based counseling center in the Tempe area serving Arizona State University students. RLCC strives to bring healing and wholeness to each student who comes through the doors, to empower them to realize and live out their potential, by providing them with the skills to accomplish their dreams and live full lives, through counseling, motivation, education, and treating studentʼs behaviors to become whole and successful. Research indicates that the proposed center, Renewed Living Counseling Center (RLCC), has great potential for success because:

1. Spirituality and faith are increasingly recognized as important aspects in a personʼs life. National research shows that 66% of people feel counseling should include spirituality. Research with ASU students found that students reflect this statistic, as they feel spirituality is an important part of counseling. Students also feel spirituality is appropriate to include as part of counseling services offered by centers referred to by ASU.

2. There is a need for counseling at ASU. Nationally,approximately1,100 college students commit suicide each year. At ASU, almost one-third of students reported feeling so depressed that it is difficult to function, and 0.9% report having attempted suicide within the past year.

3. Surveys of ASU students indicate that students who describe themselves as being religious are more desirous that counseling include a spiritual dimension. Surveys of campus pastors indicate that over 80% believe there is a need for faith-based counseling and would refer students to a local center.

4. Price is an issue. Indeed, a survey of campus pastors indicated that they believed cost of counseling to be one of the primary deterrents to students seeking help. One way to control costs is to use a mixture of residents and licensed counselors. As in medicine, students must complete coursework along with a period of residency or internship to obtain licensing. Both religious and secular masters programs in counseling exist in the greater Phoenix area. Thus, there is a potential supply of students who could work as residents, permitting RLCC to offer counseling services at reasonable prices.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

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Interpersonal problem type, gender, and outcome in psychotherapy

Description

This study examined the relationship that gender in interaction with interpersonal problem type has with outcome in psychotherapy. A sample of 200 individuals, who sought psychotherapy at a counselor training

This study examined the relationship that gender in interaction with interpersonal problem type has with outcome in psychotherapy. A sample of 200 individuals, who sought psychotherapy at a counselor training facility, completed the Outcome Questionnaire-45(OQ-45) and the reduced version of the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems (IIP-32). This study was aimed at examining whether gender (male and female), was related to treatment outcome, and whether this relationship was moderated by two interpersonal distress dimensions: dominance and affiliation. A hierarchical regression analyses was performed and indicated that gender did not predict psychotherapy treatment outcome, and neither dominance nor affiliation were moderators of the relationship between gender and outcome in psychotherapy.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013

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Professional Help-seeking Attitudes among Latter-day Saints: The Role of Gender, Distress, and Religiosity

Description

Factors of gender, marital status, and psychological distress are known to be related to help-seeking attitudes. This study sought to explore and understand the relations between gender, marital status, religiosity,

Factors of gender, marital status, and psychological distress are known to be related to help-seeking attitudes. This study sought to explore and understand the relations between gender, marital status, religiosity, psychological distress, and help-seeking attitudes among members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormons). The moderating effect of religious commitment on psychological distress and attitudes towards seeking professional help was explored through an online survey of 1,201 Latter-day Saint individuals. It was predicted that gender and marital status would predict distress and helping seeking attitudes and that religiosity would moderate the relation between distress and help-seeking attitudes among religious individuals, with individuals who experience high distress and low religiosity being more likely to seek help than individuals with high distress and high religiosity. Participants completed the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K-10), Religious Commitment Inventory-10, and the Attitudes Toward Seeking Professional Psychological Help-Short Form online. Multiple hierarchical regressions were used to test the study hypotheses. Although the accounted for variances were small, gender was the most significant variable associated with both distress and help seeking. Females reported higher distress and being more willing to seek psychological help than did males. Religiosity did not moderate the relation between distress and help-seeking attitudes. These findings are discussed in light of previous research and gender role schemas as relevant to Mormon culture.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018

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Counselor Humor and the Working Relationship

Description

While there is an extensive literature on the theoretical and anecdotal basis of

humor being a key aspect of psychotherapy, there is relatively little research. In this study, I addressed whether

While there is an extensive literature on the theoretical and anecdotal basis of

humor being a key aspect of psychotherapy, there is relatively little research. In this study, I addressed whether the frequency of therapist humor is related to subsequent therapeutic alliance ratings by the client. I also examined if therapist humor use is related to improvement in client symptomology. I hypothesized that there will be a positive correlation between humor use and the working alliance while there will be a negative correlation between humor use and client symptomology. Video recordings of therapy sessions were coded for humor (defined by laughter present in response to the therapist) or no humor (laughter not present). These ratings were correlated to client perceptions of the working alliance (using the WAI-S) and client symptomology. I found no correlations between humor and changes in working alliance or client symptomology. The results suggest that humor use in counseling does not seem to matter, however possible limitations of the study mitigate such conclusions.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019

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The relationship between clinical experience, emotional intelligence and counselor self-efficacy with resilience as a moderator

Description

Emotions are essential ingredients to the human experience. How one feels influences how one thinks and behaves. The processing capacity for emotion-related information can be thought of as emotional

Emotions are essential ingredients to the human experience. How one feels influences how one thinks and behaves. The processing capacity for emotion-related information can be thought of as emotional intelligence (Salovey & Mayer, 1997). Regulating emotions and coping with emotional experiences are among the most common reasons individuals seek counseling. Counselors must be uniquely equipped in processing and managing emotional content. Counselor’s skills and abilities related to emotional intelligence are vital to effective counseling. There is indication that confidence in one’s counseling skills may be equally as important as competence in these skills. Counselor self-efficacy, one’s belief in one’s ability to perform counseling activities, has been shown to relate to counselor performance and ability and increased clinical experience has been associated with higher levels of counselor self-efficacy (Larson & Daniels, 1998). One’s emotion-related information processing abilities and one’s clinical experiences may contribute to one’s perception of one’s competencies and abilities as a counselor.

However, this relationship may not be a simple cause-and-effect association. Individuals may possess a certain aptitude (emotional intelligence) and not perceive themselves as competent as counselors. Resilience, one’s ability to “bounce-back” and persevere through adversity may moderate the relation between emotional intelligence and counselor self-efficacy (Wagnild, 1990).

The current study explored the relations among clinical experience, emotional intelligence and resilience in predicting self-efficacy. In addition, whether resilience would moderate the relationship between emotional intelligence and counselor self-efficacy was examined. Eighty counselor trainees enrolled in CACREP-accredited master’s programs participated in this study online. They completed a demographics form, the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT; Mayer, et al., 2002), the Counselor Activities Self-Efficacy Scales (CASES; Lent et al., 2003), and The Resilience Scale (RS; Wagnild & Young, 1993). Multiple hierarchical regressions revealed clinical experience (specifically a completed practicum), emotional intelligence, and resilience predicted counselor self-efficacy. The moderation was not significant. These findings support the value of the exploration of clinical experience, emotional intelligence and resilience in developing counselor self-efficacy. A more comprehensive discussion of the findings, limitations, and implications of the current study as well as suggested direction for future research are discussed herein.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017

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Damaged petals and tenacity: values expressed in fourth generation rap

Description

Employing ethnographic content analysis of 110 top Hip-Hop songs of 2004-2014 from Billboard and BET awards, this study investigated the most popular value themes of 4th generation Hip-Hop music and

Employing ethnographic content analysis of 110 top Hip-Hop songs of 2004-2014 from Billboard and BET awards, this study investigated the most popular value themes of 4th generation Hip-Hop music and compared the messages of female and male rap artists. The 12 most frequently referenced messages included: 1) Celebration of Personal Success (77%), 2) Urban Consciousness, Identity, and Pride (68.8%), 3) Sexual Prowess/Seductive Power (62.1%), 4) Recreational Drug Use (54.9%), 5) Ready and Willing to Become Violent (48.8%), 6) Sexual Objectification (48.2%), 7) Reappropriation of Stigma Labels (36.4%), 8) Drive and Ambition (28.5%), 9) Self-Objectification (28.5%), 10) Struggle and Resilience (20%), 11) Providing Resources in Exchange for Sex (15.1%), and 12) Providing Sex in Exchange for Resources (10.3%). Male and female rap artists expressed similar messages. However, female rap artists were more likely to reappropriate stigma labels, promote self-objectifying lyrics, and depict themselves as providing sex in exchange for resources in their lyrics than were male rap artists. Male rap artists were more likely to sexually objectify others in their lyrics and depict themselves as providing resources in exchange for sex than were their female counterparts. Implications for counseling and suggestions for future research are discussed.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015