Matching Items (26)

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Adverse Childhood Experiences and Maternal Education

Description

Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are traumatic events experienced during childhood that have negative effects starting as a child and extending into adulthood. The presence of multiple ACEs increases negative mental,

Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are traumatic events experienced during childhood that have negative effects starting as a child and extending into adulthood. The presence of multiple ACEs increases negative mental, physical, and behavioral health outcomes. Children of parents who have experienced ACEs are at a higher risk of experiencing ACEs themselves, creating an intergenerational cycle of trauma between parents and their children. Evidence suggests that parenting education can reduce the impact of ACEs and potentially eliminate poor health outcomes. The literature revealed that parenting education was found to increase parenting competency, which will in turn reduce the impact of ACEs on children.

The purpose of this evidence-based project is to evaluate parenting competency and parenting self-efficacy after implementing six parenting workshops. The workshop topics consist of: (a) stress management, (b) understanding trauma, (c) positive parenting, (d) positive discipline, (e) play, and (f) learning development and support. The workshops were delivered at a community residential facility for women seeking recovery from abuse, incarceration, chemical dependency and other life-controlling problems. Participants included 10 female residents.

Demographics, ACE scores, pre and post Parenting Sense of Competency Scale, and a post intervention satisfaction questionnaire and discussion were used to collect data from the participants. Mothers’ ACE scores ranged from 2-9. The parenting self-efficacy score increased in the subgroup that attended all six workshops. All of the mothers agreed that the workshops would help with parenting their children. The findings suggest that parenting education increases parenting knowledge and self-efficacy, and may reduce the impact of ACEs on children.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05-04

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A Retroactive Study of Parsons Center for Pediatric Dentistry Patient Parents/Guardians: Uncovering Motive for Seeking Specialty Dental Treatment

Description

Parents of patients receiving treatment at Parsons Center for Pediatric Dentistry and Orthodontics were surveyed in this study in an effort to uncover their motivations to seek specialty dental treatment

Parents of patients receiving treatment at Parsons Center for Pediatric Dentistry and Orthodontics were surveyed in this study in an effort to uncover their motivations to seek specialty dental treatment for their children. Parsons Center for Pediatric Dentistry and Orthodontics is a specialty dental clinic that focuses on increasing the accessibility of dental care, serving both insured and uninsured patients in Phoenix, Arizona. The demographic of this study is assumed to be the surrounding areas, including Maricopa County and the zip code to which Parsons pertains, 85009. Approximately half of the population in this area are low income individuals, and a large percentage of the population are of Hispanic/Latino heritage. Over the course of this investigation, eighty participating parents completed a short survey to determine factors relevant in their decision to obtain pediatric, as opposed to general (family) dental treatment, for their children. Parents were asked questions regarding their age, the age and dental treatment history of their children, and the relevance of six factors in their decision to visit the Parsons Center. Overall, "professional/personal recommendation" was the decision factor with the highest average relevance valuation followed by "Spanish-speaking staff," "location," "lack of insurance," "insurance accepted," and "past (patient) traumatic experience." Results suggest the importance of quality care and word-of-mouth recommendations as well as the significance of understanding and serving the needs of one's surrounding population effectively.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

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Quality of Life and Health Metrics in Young Children at Genetic Risk for Speech and Language Disorder and their Parents: Broad and longitudinal effects of a proactive intervention, the Babble Boot Camp

Description

The objective of this study was to examine the quality of life health metrics of parents whose children were diagnosed with Classic Galactosemia and underwent a proactive treatment program. The

The objective of this study was to examine the quality of life health metrics of parents whose children were diagnosed with Classic Galactosemia and underwent a proactive treatment program. The data analyzed in this study came from the Babble Boot Camp©, which included one control family and nine treatment families. The Babble Boot Camp© is an innovative intervention program that is implemented via parent training. Child progress and parent quality of life are closely monitored in regular intervals. The purpose of this study was to evaluate if the intervention was successful in terms of child language growth, how the child’s progress affected the parent’s quality of life, and if there were differences in the psychological and physical health of the mothers and fathers. We utilized a variety of questionnaires, specifically the Ages and Stages Questionnaires- 3 (ASQ3) (Squires & Bricker, 2009), Pediatric Quality of Life (PedsQL) Questionnaire (Varni, 1998), Parental Stress Index (PSI-4) (Abidin 2012) and the MacArthur CDI Questionnaire (MBCDI2) (Fenson et al., 2007). The three main findings of this study are: the BBC© treatment protocol showed beneficial gain to the children, the development of the child did affect the parent’s quality of life, and the mother’s physical health was significantly worse than the father’s in terms of health metrics. The significance of this study is to identify preliminary trends in quality of life data of the parents. Clinical implications for the future include investigation of various possible factors driving the improvement of the parent’s quality of life.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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The Read Aloud Revolution: An Examination of the Read Aloud Practice and the Roles Fathers Play

Description

Reading aloud is an experience that provides children with cognitive and social emotional
benefits. Fathers are often not a part of this experience due to outdated gender roles that have

Reading aloud is an experience that provides children with cognitive and social emotional
benefits. Fathers are often not a part of this experience due to outdated gender roles that have led
to the classification of reading as a feminized activity. This review discusses the literature
surrounding the cognitive and social-emotional benefits of reading aloud to children. In addition
to academic literature, this paper takes into account the experiences of educators and parents
shared through social media and literacy organizations external to academia due to their presence
on the front lines of the reading aloud. This paper is divided into five sections, each of which
addresses a different domain of the read aloud practice. The first section is a personal narrative in
which the author shares a story surrounding her experience with read alouds to provide context
on why this topic was chosen for her undergraduate thesis. Section two addresses the importance
of read alouds in a child’s literacy journey and serves as a framework for the remainder of the
review. Section three discusses the vitality of the participation of fathers in the practice and
includes the explanation of the feminization of reading and the implications of the lack of fathers
within the read aloud experience. Section four discusses the implications of fathers taking an
active role in reading aloud. Lastly, section five serves as a resource pool for fathers, including
tips, a guide to community resources, and sample book lists.
Keywords: read aloud, gender roles, educator, literacy, parents, fathers

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-12

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Parental Stress in Raising a Child with ADHD

Description

This paper investigates how stress in parents is affected by their child's Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). The purpose of this paper is to identify common stressors for parents of children with

This paper investigates how stress in parents is affected by their child's Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). The purpose of this paper is to identify common stressors for parents of children with ADHD, as well as to determine what parents need from healthcare providers to mediate this stress. A survey was developed to identify sources of stress, consequences of parental stress, parental coping methods, resources provided by their healthcare provider that have been helpful, along with what they feel that they need from their healthcare providers in order to better support themselves and their family. Participants were composed of members of Facebook support groups for parents of children with ADHD. Major findings of this study include: parents experience the most stress when dealing with their child's oppositional and aggressive behaviors; parents frequently experience disruption in their marital relationship; and parents perceive that they receive little health care resources that are helpful for themselves, their child, and their family overall.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Enabling Parents Online: Creating an Online Lesson Platform

Description

Customized online education is a means of educating a large amount of users in a way that will change their behavior at a low incremental cost to the one providing

Customized online education is a means of educating a large amount of users in a way that will change their behavior at a low incremental cost to the one providing the information. This thesis will examine several aspects of online education, but primarily focus on the presentation of the materials. It will examine how this is done through a consulting project I worked on in conjunction with the New Venture Group for Parenting Arizona. Parenting Arizona is a non-profit organization based in Arizona that offers classes for parents who are seeking better ways to manage their family responsibilities. The purpose of the consulting project was to take the instructional materials used in in-person group classes and modify it to be effectively used for instruction in an online environment. Parenting Arizona foresaw a number of benefits from this modification and migration of instructional materials for the web; first among these was the ability of people in remote areas or in situations that did not allow them to attend an on-ground class to gain access to instructional material. In addition, the broader availability of the material that would come from its presence on the web would expand the influence of good parenting instructions to a greater audience both inside and outside the State of Arizona, aiding even more families.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2012-05

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Systematic Literature Review Conceptualization of Inclusive Education within Arizona's Borderlands

Description

This comprehensive literature review synthesized 18 studies, from 15 search engines about the conceptualization of inclusive education within Arizona's borderlands from the viewpoints of educators, researchers, policy makers and family

This comprehensive literature review synthesized 18 studies, from 15 search engines about the conceptualization of inclusive education within Arizona's borderlands from the viewpoints of educators, researchers, policy makers and family members. Although there is research that states along international borders are complex and diverse educational spaces, the information found regarding special education along the U.S-Mexico border mostly centers on the issue of over-representation of Mexican-American, Yaqui and Navajo students. There is validity and need to present these specific issues and groups of individuals, however there is little empirical data that involves the attitudes, perspectives and experiences of other stakeholders, such as parents, educators, and administrators who participate in special education processes, in a way that reflects education in borderlands as an asset-based setting and that engages in dialogue about across all of the disabilities categories protected under IDEA and 504 plans. Key Words: special education, parents, teachers, literature review, borderlands

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Engaging Parents to Promote Healthy Eating and Physical Activity in Hispanic Preschool Children: Parent Perception of Newsletters in the Sustainability via Active Garden Education (SAGE) Intervention

Description

Hispanic youth have the highest risk for obesity, making this population a key priority for early childhood interventions to prevent the development of adult obesity and its consequences. Involving parents

Hispanic youth have the highest risk for obesity, making this population a key priority for early childhood interventions to prevent the development of adult obesity and its consequences. Involving parents in these interventions is essential to support positive long-term physical activity and nutrition habits. Interventions in the past have engaged parents by providing information about nutrition and fruit and vegetable intake through written materials or text such as newsletters and text messages. The Sustainability via Active Garden Education (SAGE) intervention used gardening and interactive activities to teach preschool children ages 3-5 about healthy eating and physical activity. It aimed to increase physical activity and fruit and vegetable intake in preschool children as well as improve related parenting practices. The intervention utilized newsletters to engage parents by promoting opportunities to increase physical activity and fruit and vegetable intake for their children at home. The newsletters also encouraged parents to discuss what was learned during the SAGE lessons with their children. The purpose of this paper is to describe the content of the newsletters and determine the parent perception of the newsletters through parent survey responses. This can help inform future childhood obesity interventions and parent engagement.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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The Effects of Unemployment on Children

Description

This research looked at the effects unemployment had on children. A searched of the previous research few studies on the effects unemployment had on children. The leading research article, or

This research looked at the effects unemployment had on children. A searched of the previous research few studies on the effects unemployment had on children. The leading research article, or genesis of the later studies found on the topic, was the 1938 study done by Einsenburg and Lazafeld. In that study, they found that children experience many negative effects from having an unemployed parent. In the current study, a total of 111 participants, (79 females and 32 males), in the study most of the volunteers came from Arizona State University, and the surrounding area. The research hypothesis (H1) was that individuals who had an unemployed parent as a child (Children/child for this study was defined being between the ages of 10-15) were more likely to be depressed, isolated, bullied, have an increase of illness, be less optimistic about the future and experience a decline in school performance than individuals whose parents were never unemployed. The current study found that having an unemployed parent led to being more depressed, isolated, optimistic, and having lower school performance and self-esteem in adolescence. Interestingly the study also found that as an adult the child of unemployed parents was more likely to be bullied as an adult. The results of this study furthered the research on the effects of unemployment had on children, and recommendations were made for future studies on the effects of parents unemployment has on children.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2013-05

The Primer Project: Creating an Interactive Children's Storybook

Description

As part of a group project, myself and four teammates created an interactive children's storybook based off of the "Young Lady's Illustrated Primer" in Neal Stephenson's novel The Diamond Age.

As part of a group project, myself and four teammates created an interactive children's storybook based off of the "Young Lady's Illustrated Primer" in Neal Stephenson's novel The Diamond Age. This electronic book is meant to be read aloud by a caregiver with their child, and is designed for reading over long distances through the use of real-time voice and video calling. While one part of the team focused on building the electronic book itself and writing the program, myself and two others wrote the story and I provided illustrations. Our Primer tells the story of a young princess named Charname (short for character name) who escapes from a tower and goes on a mission to save four companions to help her on her quest. The book is meant for reader-insertion, and teaches children problem-solving, teamwork, and critical thinking skills by presenting challenges for Princess Charname to solve. The Primer borrows techniques from modern video game design, focusing heavily on interactivity and feelings of agency through offering the child choices of how to proceed, similar to choose-your-own-adventure books. If brought to market, the medium lends itself well to expanded quests and storylines for the child to explore as they learn and grow. Additionally, resources are provided for the narrator to help create an engaging experience for the child, based off of research on parent-child cooperative reading and cooperative gameplay. The final version of the Primer included a website to run the program, a book-like computer to access the program online, and three complete story segments for the child and narrator to read together.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05