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Stories of Female Figures in Norse Mythology Adapted for Children:Women of Norse Myth: For Little Goddesses

Description

Popular culture tends to downplay strong female characters to favor a plethora of male figures that children look up to as heroes. This creates a gender imbalance in exposure to inspirational characters that children can look up to as role

Popular culture tends to downplay strong female characters to favor a plethora of male figures that children look up to as heroes. This creates a gender imbalance in exposure to inspirational characters that children can look up to as role models. For our team's creative project, we chose to write and illustrate a children's book mainly targeted at young girls, ages eight to twelve that focuses on the stories of selected female figures of Norse mythology. The five stories in our collection focus on the figures Frigg, Skadi, Elli, Idunn, and Freya and are inspired by the mythology contained in the Prose Edda by Snorri Sturluson and selected medieval texts on the Germanic Lombard tribe. Through our book, Women of Norse Myth: For Little Goddesses, we wanted to introduce children to Norse mythology, a branch of myth that is often overshadowed by more popular mythologies such as Roman and Greek. Additionally, our goal was to bring light to the female figures within Norse myth that are generally given less attention than their male counterparts. Keeping in mind these goals, the stories were adapted from the original myths in a manner that would be suitable for a young audience as well as our aim for female empowerment. The final manuscript contains an introduction to Norse cosmology, introductions to the figures, a glossary of Norse terms used, and the illustrated stories themselves. Together with our combined talents, interests, and goals, Women of Norse Myth: For Little Goddesses was completed, and we hope that someday it can be published and serve as a fun and inspiring storybook for children to read and learn from.

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Date Created
2016-05

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The Influence of Parental Overprotection on the Prevention of Anxiety Symptoms in Caucasian and Hispanic/Latino Children

Description

This study examined whether changes in intervention related gains from the REACH for Personal and Academic Success program, an indicated anxiety prevention school-based protocol, vary as a function of participant youth's exposure to overprotective parenting. This study also examined if

This study examined whether changes in intervention related gains from the REACH for Personal and Academic Success program, an indicated anxiety prevention school-based protocol, vary as a function of participant youth's exposure to overprotective parenting. This study also examined if ethnicity/race (Caucasian vs. Hispanic/Latino) interacts with overprotective parenting to predict program response. A total of 98 children (M age = 9.70, SD = .07; 77.60% girls; 60.20% Hispanic/Latino) received 1 of 2 protocols (REACH or academic support) and responses were measured at post-treatment and 1-year follow-up. Findings showed that child self-regulation skills improved in the school program (REACH) for children of parents with low levels of overprotection, and child self-regulation skills improved in the control program (academic support) for children of parents with high levels of overprotection. These findings were significant in the Hispanic/Latino subsample, but not in Caucasian youth.

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Date Created
2016-05

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Accessibility to Information in the City of Phoenix Regarding Childhood Vaccinations: A Comparative Case Study

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The rate of vaccinations has been consistently decreasing in the past years in children of ages 0-18. Multiple factors and barriers contribute to these low rates. This comparative case study investigated the accessibility of information regarding childhood vaccinations to parents

The rate of vaccinations has been consistently decreasing in the past years in children of ages 0-18. Multiple factors and barriers contribute to these low rates. This comparative case study investigated the accessibility of information regarding childhood vaccinations to parents in areas with differing poverty levels in the greater Phoenix region, specifically in the West Valley, Downtown Phoenix, and the East Valley. Pediatric clinics, public elementary schools, and public libraries were visited in each area to assess how much information was available where. The analysis produced unexpected results: the West Valley, which had the highest poverty level, contained the most amount of accessible information for parents in many languages, while the East Valley, with a low poverty level, had almost no information accessible to parents of these children. Implications for future research, policy, and practice are discussed. Based on these unexpected results, one recommendation is to develop a pamphlet that could be distributed to these public places to raise awareness of the importance of vaccinations in children to parents.

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Date Created
2020-05

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Light Exposure and Children's Sleep: A Twin Study with Objective Measurement

Description

Sufficient sleep in childhood is fundamental to proper development as well as preventing behavioral or emotional complications later in adulthood (Gregory & Sadeh, 2012; Bruni, 2010). Sleep is controlled by a 24-hour cycle of hormonal regulation termed the circadian rhythm,

Sufficient sleep in childhood is fundamental to proper development as well as preventing behavioral or emotional complications later in adulthood (Gregory & Sadeh, 2012; Bruni, 2010). Sleep is controlled by a 24-hour cycle of hormonal regulation termed the circadian rhythm, which is controlled by different environmental inputs such as light (Reppert & Weaver, 2002). Previous research has also demonstrated that light exposure at night can delay the night phase production of specific hormones that promote sleep (Zeitzer, Dijk, Kronauer, Brown, & Czeisler, 2004; Chang, Aeschbach, Duffy, & Czeisler, 2015), which in turn delays sleep onset. Such studies involving the effects that light may have on sleep have focused on adult subjects, however, and it is important to explore this idea in childhood to promote proper development. The first aim of this study was to examine the effects of light exposure in the hour before bedtime on different measures of sleep in middle childhood. The second aim was to determine the genetic and environmental contributions to light exposure and sleep. A diverse sample of 490 twin children was assessed at 8 years of age. Twins followed a week long protocol in which they wore actigraph watches that collected data on both light and sleep. Zero-order correlations with subsequent multilevel regression analyses showed that any light exposure in the hour before bedtime was significantly positively associated with sleep onset latency. Twin intraclass correlations indicated no heritability for light exposure, but did indicate some heritability ranging from 7-66% for the sleep indicators. Overall, these findings regarding the impacts of sleep in childhood build upon an area of research that has only been explored in adulthood. These impacts of light on sleep in childhood suggest that possible interventions ought to be explored for implementation to minimize the long-term effects of altered sleeping patterns in childhood.

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Created

Date Created
2019-05

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A critical literature review and case study of the 'draw and write' research technique

Description

The ‘draw and write’ research technique was developed as a bottom-up approach to gaining access to children’s ideas, experiences, and views of the world around them in areas such as health, education, and social issues. While the technique may allow

The ‘draw and write’ research technique was developed as a bottom-up approach to gaining access to children’s ideas, experiences, and views of the world around them in areas such as health, education, and social issues. While the technique may allow children to participate in research in a way that is less restrictive than other techniques, many critique the method for its adverse ethical concerns, validity, and issues of interpretation and analysis. This article reviews the ‘draw and write’ research technique and its common critiques as well as offers a case study of the ‘draw and write’ technique, performed with children in Acatenango, Guatemala, in order to validate the accuracy of the ‘draw and write’ technique in depicting specific quantitative results.

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Created

Date Created
2016-12

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Family-Centered Perspectives to Improving Care Coordination for Children with Special Health Care Needs

Description

It is well known that the lack of care coordination in the healthcare system causes numerous problems including cost inefficiency and inconsistent care, specifically for complex pediatric and adult patients. Many pediatric patients have complex medical and social service needs

It is well known that the lack of care coordination in the healthcare system causes numerous problems including cost inefficiency and inconsistent care, specifically for complex pediatric and adult patients. Many pediatric patients have complex medical and social service needs which can be expensive for both the patient’s parents and the general healthcare system. Therefore, it is difficult for the healthcare system to deliver the highest quality care possible, due to the number of appointments that have to be scheduled (with some being out of state), the large volume of physical health records, and overall lack of time parents have to coordinate this care while also caring for themselves and other family members. It is integral to find a more efficient way to coordinate care for these patients, in order to improve overall care, cost efficiency, and outcomes. <br/>A number of stakeholders in Arizona came together to work on this problem over several years. They were funded through a PCORI Eugene Washington Engagement grant to investigators at ASU. This project, Take Action for Arizona's Children through Care Coordination: A Bridge to Action was developed in order to further develop a research agenda and build the network (PCOR). Regional conferences were conducted in Flagstaff, Yuma, Phoenix, and Tucson, as well as a final capstone conference held in Phoenix. At these conferences, frustrations, suggestions, and opinions regarding Children with Special Health Care Needs (CSHCN) and navigating the healthcare system were shared and testimonials were transcribed.<br/>This study focused on the capstone conference. The study design was a strategic design workshop; results of the design analysis were analyzed qualitatively using descriptive content analysis. Themes described parent’s common experiences navigating the system, impacts resulting from such experiences, and desires for the care coordination system. Quotes were then grouped into major themes and subthemes for the capstone conference. After these themes were determined, the overarching goals of stakeholders could be assessed, and implementation projects could be described.

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Date Created
2021-05