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The Healthy Pregnancy Summit is a collection of videos from a variety of specialists detailing how to have a healthy pregnancy and healthy child, based on the latest scientific and medical information. This project summarizes each presentation, and compares to the Healthy Child Guide, a document supplementary to the summit.

The Healthy Pregnancy Summit is a collection of videos from a variety of specialists detailing how to have a healthy pregnancy and healthy child, based on the latest scientific and medical information. This project summarizes each presentation, and compares to the Healthy Child Guide, a document supplementary to the summit. Finally, this project analyzes the overall usefulness of the summit and each presentation, and suggests areas for improvement.

ContributorsKragenbring, Kylee (Author) / Adams, James (Thesis director) / Matthews, Julie (Committee member) / Barrett, The Honors College (Contributor) / School of Life Sciences (Contributor) / School of Human Evolution & Social Change (Contributor)
Created2023-05
Description

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder is a psychiatric disorder that affects 2-3% of children. OCD causes anxiety, fear, upsetting thoughts, and obsessions/compulsions. These symptoms can manifest in different ways and kids can become stuck in a stressful cycle of anxiety and the need to act on compulsions. Currently on the children's book

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder is a psychiatric disorder that affects 2-3% of children. OCD causes anxiety, fear, upsetting thoughts, and obsessions/compulsions. These symptoms can manifest in different ways and kids can become stuck in a stressful cycle of anxiety and the need to act on compulsions. Currently on the children's book market, OCD is an underrepresented topic. I chose to design a children's book that tackles the stigma of OCD in a form that is easy for children to understand.

ContributorsRaybon, Sophia (Author) / Ingram-Waters, Mary (Thesis director) / Davis, Jena (Committee member) / Barrett, The Honors College (Contributor) / School of Life Sciences (Contributor) / Sanford School of Social and Family Dynamics (Contributor)
Created2022-05
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Description

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder is a psychiatric disorder that affects 2-3% of children. OCD causes anxiety, fear, upsetting thoughts, and obsessions/compulsions. These symptoms can manifest in different ways and kids can become stuck in a stressful cycle of anxiety and the need to act on compulsions. Currently on the children's book

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder is a psychiatric disorder that affects 2-3% of children. OCD causes anxiety, fear, upsetting thoughts, and obsessions/compulsions. These symptoms can manifest in different ways and kids can become stuck in a stressful cycle of anxiety and the need to act on compulsions. Currently on the children's book market, OCD is an underrepresented topic. I chose to design a children's book that tackles the stigma of OCD in a form that is easy for children to understand.

ContributorsRaybon, Sophia (Author) / Ingram-Waters, Mary (Thesis director) / Davis, Jena (Committee member) / Barrett, The Honors College (Contributor) / School of Life Sciences (Contributor)
Created2022-05
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Description

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder is a psychiatric disorder that affects 2-3% of children. OCD causes anxiety, fear, upsetting thoughts, and obsessions/compulsions. These symptoms can manifest in different ways and kids can become stuck in a stressful cycle of anxiety and the need to act on compulsions. Currently on the children's book

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder is a psychiatric disorder that affects 2-3% of children. OCD causes anxiety, fear, upsetting thoughts, and obsessions/compulsions. These symptoms can manifest in different ways and kids can become stuck in a stressful cycle of anxiety and the need to act on compulsions. Currently on the children's book market, OCD is an underrepresented topic. I chose to design a children's book that tackles the stigma of OCD in a form that is easy for children to understand.

ContributorsRaybon, Sophia (Author) / Ingram-Waters, Mary (Thesis director) / Davis, Jena (Committee member) / Barrett, The Honors College (Contributor) / School of Life Sciences (Contributor)
Created2022-05
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Description

This creative project examines the effectiveness of several school based nutritional education and parent based programs along with multi-component interventions. Six published articles were reviewed and summarized to identify the most successful interventions to prevent childhood obesity. In addition to these studies other resources were examined to understand the developmental

This creative project examines the effectiveness of several school based nutritional education and parent based programs along with multi-component interventions. Six published articles were reviewed and summarized to identify the most successful interventions to prevent childhood obesity. In addition to these studies other resources were examined to understand the developmental levels of school-aged and adolescent students. As part of this project a narrated power point covering the key aspects of the nutritional needs of the school-aged child was developed. This power point will be utilized by future nursing students whom are working with parents in the schools or in the community on nutrition strategies. The power point will provide a context for individual or group discussions with parents to offer helpful ideas on how to work effectively with their children. The topic of nutrition and obesity in school-aged children is a current topic in health care especially in environments where nutritional resources are limited. The overall outcome of this project will be to assist in decreasing the incidence of overweight and obese youth and the prevention of the development of premature chronic diseases especially in early adolescence and young adulthood.

ContributorsLopez, Leticia Marie (Author) / Hosley, Brenda (Thesis director) / Speer, Therese (Committee member) / Storto, Pamela (Committee member) / Barrett, The Honors College (Contributor) / College of Nursing and Health Innovation (Contributor)
Created2014-12
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Description

With the overall health of the environment rapidly declining \u2014 mostly due to human behaviors, solving the problem of nature deficit disorder and getting more children interested and aware of nature could be paramount to improving the environmental health of our planet. In this study, the relationship between children's learning

With the overall health of the environment rapidly declining \u2014 mostly due to human behaviors, solving the problem of nature deficit disorder and getting more children interested and aware of nature could be paramount to improving the environmental health of our planet. In this study, the relationship between children's learning and emotion is explored. Pre- and post-tests were given to children attending a week-long summer freshwater ecology camp; their knowledge of and emotional connection to different ecological concepts were measured. Two separate ecosystems were tested \u2014 a freshwater ecosystem that was taught over the course of the week, and a marine ecosystem for comparison. Increases in knowledge and emotion were seen in every freshwater ecosystem concept. Additionally, the knowledge and emotion scores were correlated, suggesting a positive relationship between them. The marine ecosystem did not show improvements in concrete knowledge, but showed increases in abstract learning, indicating that the abstract concepts learned about the freshwater ecosystem were able to transfer to the marine. Overall results show the ability of a hands-on learning experience to foster an emotional connection between a child and the subject matter. However, long-term studies are needed to track the relationship between children and their knowledge of and emotional connection to the subject matter.

ContributorsMossler, Max Vaughn (Author) / Pearson, David (Thesis director) / Smith, Andrew (Committee member) / Berkowitz, Alan (Committee member) / Barrett, The Honors College (Contributor) / School of Sustainability (Contributor) / School of Life Sciences (Contributor)
Created2013-05
Description

As part of a group project, myself and four teammates created an interactive children's storybook based off of the "Young Lady's Illustrated Primer" in Neal Stephenson's novel The Diamond Age. This electronic book is meant to be read aloud by a caregiver with their child, and is designed for reading

As part of a group project, myself and four teammates created an interactive children's storybook based off of the "Young Lady's Illustrated Primer" in Neal Stephenson's novel The Diamond Age. This electronic book is meant to be read aloud by a caregiver with their child, and is designed for reading over long distances through the use of real-time voice and video calling. While one part of the team focused on building the electronic book itself and writing the program, myself and two others wrote the story and I provided illustrations. Our Primer tells the story of a young princess named Charname (short for character name) who escapes from a tower and goes on a mission to save four companions to help her on her quest. The book is meant for reader-insertion, and teaches children problem-solving, teamwork, and critical thinking skills by presenting challenges for Princess Charname to solve. The Primer borrows techniques from modern video game design, focusing heavily on interactivity and feelings of agency through offering the child choices of how to proceed, similar to choose-your-own-adventure books. If brought to market, the medium lends itself well to expanded quests and storylines for the child to explore as they learn and grow. Additionally, resources are provided for the narrator to help create an engaging experience for the child, based off of research on parent-child cooperative reading and cooperative gameplay. The final version of the Primer included a website to run the program, a book-like computer to access the program online, and three complete story segments for the child and narrator to read together.

ContributorsLax, Amelia Ann Riedel (Author) / Dove-Viebahn, Aviva (Thesis director) / Wetzel, Jon (Committee member) / School of Life Sciences (Contributor) / Barrett, The Honors College (Contributor)
Created2016-05
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Description

The rate of vaccinations has been consistently decreasing in the past years in children of ages 0-18. Multiple factors and barriers contribute to these low rates. This comparative case study investigated the accessibility of information regarding childhood vaccinations to parents in areas with differing poverty levels in the greater Phoenix

The rate of vaccinations has been consistently decreasing in the past years in children of ages 0-18. Multiple factors and barriers contribute to these low rates. This comparative case study investigated the accessibility of information regarding childhood vaccinations to parents in areas with differing poverty levels in the greater Phoenix region, specifically in the West Valley, Downtown Phoenix, and the East Valley. Pediatric clinics, public elementary schools, and public libraries were visited in each area to assess how much information was available where. The analysis produced unexpected results: the West Valley, which had the highest poverty level, contained the most amount of accessible information for parents in many languages, while the East Valley, with a low poverty level, had almost no information accessible to parents of these children. Implications for future research, policy, and practice are discussed. Based on these unexpected results, one recommendation is to develop a pamphlet that could be distributed to these public places to raise awareness of the importance of vaccinations in children to parents.

ContributorsShah, Veedhi (Author) / Bates, Denise (Thesis director) / Castillo, Elizabeth (Committee member) / College of Health Solutions (Contributor) / School of Life Sciences (Contributor) / School of International Letters and Cultures (Contributor) / Barrett, The Honors College (Contributor)
Created2020-05
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Description

Previous research demonstrated the overall efficacy of an embodied language intervention (EMBRACE) that taught pre-school children how to simulate (imagine) language in a heard narrative. However, EMBRACE was not effective for every child. To try to explain this variable response to the intervention, the video recordings made during the

Previous research demonstrated the overall efficacy of an embodied language intervention (EMBRACE) that taught pre-school children how to simulate (imagine) language in a heard narrative. However, EMBRACE was not effective for every child. To try to explain this variable response to the intervention, the video recordings made during the four-day intervention sessions were assessed and emotion was coded. Each session was emotion-coded for child emotions and for child-researcher emotions. The child specific emotions were 1) engagement in the task, this included level of participation in the activity, 2) motivation/attention to persist and complete the task, as well as stay focused, and 3) positive affect throughout the session. The child-researcher specific emotions were 1) engagement with each other, this involved how the child interacted with the researcher and under what context, and 2) researcher’s positive affect, this incorporated how enthusiastic and encouraging the researcher was throughout the session. It was hypothesized that effectiveness of the intervention would be directly correlated with the degree that the child displayed positive emotions during the intervention. Thus, the analysis of these emotions should highlight differences between the control and EMBRACE group and help to explain variability in effectiveness of the intervention. The results did indicate that children in the EMBRACE group generally had a significantly higher positive affect compared to the control group, but these results did not influence the ability for the child to effectively recall or moderate the EEG variables in the post-test. The results also showed that children who interacted with the researcher more tended to be in the EMBRACE group, whereas children who did not interact with the researcher more frequently were in the control group, showing that the EMBRACE intervention ended up being a more collaborative task.

ContributorsOtt, Lauren Ruth (Author) / Glenberg, Arthur (Thesis director) / Presson, Clark (Committee member) / Kupfer, Anne (Committee member) / School of Life Sciences (Contributor) / Sanford School of Social and Family Dynamics (Contributor) / Department of Psychology (Contributor) / Barrett, The Honors College (Contributor)
Created2020-05
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Description

The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of a four-week martial arts program implemented once a week on children diagnosed with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) between the ages of four and seven. This was a single group, pre- and post-intervention assessment pilot study. The total sample of

The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of a four-week martial arts program implemented once a week on children diagnosed with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) between the ages of four and seven. This was a single group, pre- and post-intervention assessment pilot study. The total sample of the study was four children (n=4) and the martial arts classes were based on the Duke Kenpo Little Tiger Program by Jonathan Duke of Mesa, Arizona. Change was measured using the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function, 2nd edition (BRIEF-2) parental form and participants were encouraged to record at-home practice. Data were collected pre-intervention and four weeks afterwards. Limitations included small sample size, measurement limitation (e.g., ceiling effect), data based on parental report, a short intervention period, potential instructor bias, and uneven gender distribution. Given the small sample size (n=4), this study did not complete statistical analysis and alternatively described the changing patterns of the participant's ADHD symptoms from BRIEF-2 measures pre and post intervention. The results of this study could not generate the power to detect significance to state significant implications. However, the trends suggested that some participants declined in executive function in certain areas (e.g., task-monitoring and planning) and improved in other areas (e.g., working memory and organization of materials). All participants demonstrated improvement within the cognitive (CRI) scale of the BRIEF-2 and future studies may explore the potential for martial arts interventions in children under seven as a means to improve the cognitive aspect of executive function development. In addition, future studies may consider exploring the role of frequency versus time for at-home martial arts practice for children with ADHD under the age of seven.

ContributorsNaylor, Takara (Author) / Larkey, Linda (Thesis director) / Noah, Aggie (Committee member) / College of Nursing and Health Innovation (Contributor) / Barrett, The Honors College (Contributor)
Created2017-12