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Advancing the Implementation of Medication-Assisted Treatment in Residential Treatment

Description

Abstract
Objective: To assess the attitudes and knowledge of behavioral health technicians (BHTs)
towards opioid overdose management and to assess the effect of online training on opioid
overdose response on BHTs’ attitudes and knowledge, and the confidence to identify and

Abstract
Objective: To assess the attitudes and knowledge of behavioral health technicians (BHTs)
towards opioid overdose management and to assess the effect of online training on opioid
overdose response on BHTs’ attitudes and knowledge, and the confidence to identify and
respond to opioid overdose situations.

Design/Methods: Pre-intervention Opioid Overdose Knowledge Scale (OOKS) and Opioid
Overdose Attitude Scale (OOAS) surveys were administered electronically to five BHTs in
2020. Data obtained were de-identified. Comparisons between responses to pre-and post-surveys questions were carried out using the standardized Wilcoxon signed-rank statistical test(z). This study was conducted in a residential treatment center (RTC) with the institutional review board's approval from Arizona State University. BHTs aged 18 years and above, working at this RTC were included in the study.

Interventions: An online training was provided on opioid overdose response (OOR) and
naloxone administration and on when to refer patients with opioid use disorder (OUD) for
medication-assisted treatment.

Results: Compared to the pre-intervention surveys, the BHTs showed significant improvements
in attitudes on the overall score on the OOAS (mean= 26.4 ± 13.1; 95% CI = 10.1 - 42.7; z =
2.02; p = 0.043) and significant improvement in knowledge on the OOKS (mean= 10.6 ± 6.5;
95% CI = 2.5 – 18.7; z =2.02, p = 0.043).

Conclusions and Relevance: Training BHTs working in an RTC on opioid overdose response is
effective in increasing attitudes and knowledge related to opioid overdose management. opioid
overdose reversal in RTCs.

Keywords: Naloxone, opioid overdose, overdose education, overdose response program

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2021-04-12

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Advancing the Implementation of Medication-Assisted Treatment in Residential Treatment

Description

Objective: To assess the attitudes and knowledge of behavioral health technicians (BHTs)
towards opioid overdose management and to assess the effect of online training on opioid
overdose response on BHTs’ attitudes and knowledge, and the confidence to identify and
respond

Objective: To assess the attitudes and knowledge of behavioral health technicians (BHTs)
towards opioid overdose management and to assess the effect of online training on opioid
overdose response on BHTs’ attitudes and knowledge, and the confidence to identify and
respond to opioid overdose situations.
Design/Methods: Pre-intervention Opioid Overdose Knowledge Scale (OOKS) and Opioid
Overdose Attitude Scale (OOAS) surveys were administered electronically to five BHTs in
2020. Data obtained were de-identified. Comparisons between responses to pre-and post-surveys
questions were carried out using the standardized Wilcoxon signed-rank statistical test(z). This
study was conducted in a residential treatment center (RTC) with the institutional review board's
approval from Arizona State University. BHTs aged 18 years and above, working at this RTC
were included in the study.
Interventions: An online training was provided on opioid overdose response (OOR) and
naloxone administration and on when to refer patients with opioid use disorder (OUD) for
medication-assisted treatment.
Results: Compared to the pre-intervention surveys, the BHTs showed significant improvements
in attitudes on the overall score on the OOAS (mean= 26.4 ± 13.1; 95% CI = 10.1 - 42.7; z =
2.02; p = 0.043) and significant improvement in knowledge on the OOKS (mean= 10.6 ± 6.5;
95% CI = 2.5 – 18.7; z =2.02, p = 0.043).
Conclusions and Relevance: Training BHTs working in an RTC on opioid overdose response is
effective in increasing attitudes and knowledge related to opioid overdose management. opioid
overdose reversal in RTCs.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2021-04-12

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Opioid Overdose: How to Spot the Signs and Act

Description

Background and Aims: Due to the significant rise in opioid use and fatal opioid overdoses, an opioid reversal agent naloxone has been made available to the public through standing orders at Arizona pharmacies. The aim of this project is to

Background and Aims: Due to the significant rise in opioid use and fatal opioid overdoses, an opioid reversal agent naloxone has been made available to the public through standing orders at Arizona pharmacies. The aim of this project is to implement a virtual naloxone education program to increase community knowledge of opioid addiction, opioid overdose, and opioid overdose response. Design: Utilized a one group, pretest-posttest design utilizing Brief Opioid Overdose Knowledge (BOOK) screening tool. Participants recruited through Mesa Community College website as an online event open to students, staff, and public. Setting: Online WebEx event through Mesa Community College. Intervention: Presented a 45-minute educational PowerPoint on opioids, opioid overdose, and opioid overdose response with a 15-minute question answer session. Participants: A total of 67 people attended the online event, 38 participated in pre-test and 19 participated in post-test survey. Demographics included 73.7% female, 55.3% between ages 18-30, 86.7% identify as white/Caucasian, and 92% signed up with a community college email address. Findings: Statistically significant results, with alpha value of 0.05, t(13) = -3.99, p = .002, d=1.07. Conclusions: Implementing an online education session is associated with increased knowledge on opioid use, opioid overdose, and opioid overdose response. Implementing community-based education programs may increase knowledge on opioid overdose prevention and community intervention.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2021-04-27

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Non-Pharmacological Treatment Approach to Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

Description

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) impacts as many as 1 in 10 children. ADHD can affect academic performance, social interactions, relationships, and self-esteem. Pharmacological interventions with the use of stimulant medication is the first line of treatment. Children who

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) impacts as many as 1 in 10 children. ADHD can affect academic performance, social interactions, relationships, and self-esteem. Pharmacological interventions with the use of stimulant medication is the first line of treatment. Children who do not respond to medication trials and suffer adverse side effects need alternative treatment options to manage symptoms. New and immerging treatment options being studied to determine efficacy for symptom management is cognitive behavior therapy, social skills training, exercise and neuro feedback. They represent alternative options for non-pharmacological treatment. Evidence supports the use of these treatment options alone, or in conjunction with medication management. The evidence has led to an evidence base practice project conducted in a psychiatric outpatient clinic using Play Attention technology and quantitative behavior testing to determine the effectiveness of neurofeedback in treating children and adolescents with ADHD.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2018-04-18