Matching Items (102)

Hot Playgrounds and Children's Health: A Multiscale Analysis of Surface Temperatures in Arizona, USA

Description

Objectives: To provide novel quantification and advanced measurements of surface temperatures (Ts) in playgrounds, employing multiple scales of data, and provide insight into hot-hazard mitigation techniques and designs for improved

Objectives: To provide novel quantification and advanced measurements of surface temperatures (Ts) in playgrounds, employing multiple scales of data, and provide insight into hot-hazard mitigation techniques and designs for improved environmental and public health.

Methods: We conduct an analysis of Ts in two Metro-Phoenix playgrounds at three scales: neighborhood (1 km resolution), microscale (6.8 m resolution), and touch-scale (1 cm resolution). Data were derived from two sources: airborne remote sensing (neighborhood and microscale) and in situ (playground site) infrared Ts (touch-scale). Metrics of surface-to-air temperature deltas (Ts–a) and scale offsets (errors) are introduced.

Results: Select in situ Ts in direct sunlight are shown to approach or surpass values likely to result in burns to children at touch-scales much finer than Ts resolved by airborne remote sensing. Scale offsets based on neighbourhood and microscale ground observations are 3.8 ◦C and 7.3 ◦C less than the Ts–a at the 1 cm touch-scale, respectively, and 6.6 ◦C and 10.1 ◦C lower than touch-scale playground equipment Ts, respectively. Hence, the coarser scales underestimate high Ts within playgrounds. Both natural (tree) and artificial (shade sail) shade types are associated with significant reductions in Ts.

Conclusions: A scale mismatch exists based on differing methods of urban Ts measurement. The sub-meter touch-scale is the spatial scale at which data must be collected and policies of urban landscape design and health must be executed in order to mitigate high Ts in high-contact environments such as playgrounds. Shade implementation is the most promising mitigation technique to reduce child burns, increase park usability, and mitigate urban heating.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015-11-10

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Feasibility of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in the Treatment of Suicidality of Children

Description

Background: Suicidal ideation and attempts are increasing in the adolescent population and suicide is now the second leading cause of death for youth 10-24 years of age (Center for Disease

Background: Suicidal ideation and attempts are increasing in the adolescent population and suicide is now the second leading cause of death for youth 10-24 years of age (Center for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC], 2016). Children that continue to struggle with suicidality and depression after treatment as usual have an increased length of stay, from an average of five days to nine days per admission. Recidivism rates are also increasing, with some patients
requiring readmission the same day as discharge.

Method: The purpose of project was to check the feasibility of the use of cognitive behavioral therapy-based group called Creating Opportunities for Personal Empowerment (COPE) in the treatment of children with depression and suicidality. The study patients participated in up to 7 groups of a 60-minute lesson of COPE each day, combined with interactive activities that helped
them practice problem solving and coping skills. The feasibility of the COPE groups were measured by the consistent decrease of Columbia Suicide Severity Rating Scale at the beginning and conclusion of lessons as well as consistency of engaged participation in the COPE groups on the unit based of staff observation obtained from Staff Survey.

Results: The results analyzed using the two-tailed Wilcoxon signed rank test were significant based on an alpha value of 0.05, V = 0.00, z = -3.64, p < .001. This indicated that the differences between Pre-CSSR and Post-CSSR were not likely due to random post variation. The median of Pre-CSSR (Mdn = 1.00) was significantly lower than the median of Post-CSSR (Mdn = 2.00).

Discussion: The results proved feasibility of a cognitive behavioral therapy-based group in the treatment of depression and suicidality of children in an inpatient unit.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05-02

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A Trauma-Informed Intervention Using Mindfulness to Improve Early Childhood Classroom Environments.

Description

Research has shown adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) have a lifelong negative impact on a person’s physical, mental, and social well-being. ACEs refer to experiences related to abuse, household challenges, or

Research has shown adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) have a lifelong negative impact on a person’s physical, mental, and social well-being. ACEs refer to experiences related to abuse, household challenges, or neglect that occur before the age of 18. Some of the effects of ACEs include anxiety, depression, increased stress, increase in high-risk behaviors, and early death. Mindfulness practices have been shown to be an effective tool in reducing some of these symptoms. In looking for ways to prevent or mitigate the effects of ACEs, it is important to provide tools and resources to the adults taking care of children including; parents, guardians, and teachers.

The purpose of this evidence based project (EBP) was to evaluate mindfulness and classroom environments after the implementation of a mindfulness intervention. The intervention consisted of a three day training followed by four weeks of mindfulness practice prior to beginning the school day. Ten preschool and Early Head Start teachers from seven classrooms at a school in inner city Phoenix participated in the project. Utilizing the Five Factors Mindfulness Questionnaire pre and post intervention, a paired sample t-test showed a significant increase in two factors of mindfulness. The CLASS tool was used to assess classroom environment pre and post intervention and showed significant improvement in five classes. These findings support ongoing mindfulness training and practice for preschool and Early Head Start teachers to improve classroom environments.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05-01

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Adverse Childhood Experiences and Maternal Education

Description

Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are traumatic events experienced during childhood that have negative effects starting as a child and extending into adulthood. The presence of multiple ACEs increases negative mental,

Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are traumatic events experienced during childhood that have negative effects starting as a child and extending into adulthood. The presence of multiple ACEs increases negative mental, physical, and behavioral health outcomes. Children of parents who have experienced ACEs are at a higher risk of experiencing ACEs themselves, creating an intergenerational cycle of trauma between parents and their children. Evidence suggests that parenting education can reduce the impact of ACEs and potentially eliminate poor health outcomes. The literature revealed that parenting education was found to increase parenting competency, which will in turn reduce the impact of ACEs on children.

The purpose of this evidence-based project is to evaluate parenting competency and parenting self-efficacy after implementing six parenting workshops. The workshop topics consist of: (a) stress management, (b) understanding trauma, (c) positive parenting, (d) positive discipline, (e) play, and (f) learning development and support. The workshops were delivered at a community residential facility for women seeking recovery from abuse, incarceration, chemical dependency and other life-controlling problems. Participants included 10 female residents.

Demographics, ACE scores, pre and post Parenting Sense of Competency Scale, and a post intervention satisfaction questionnaire and discussion were used to collect data from the participants. Mothers’ ACE scores ranged from 2-9. The parenting self-efficacy score increased in the subgroup that attended all six workshops. All of the mothers agreed that the workshops would help with parenting their children. The findings suggest that parenting education increases parenting knowledge and self-efficacy, and may reduce the impact of ACEs on children.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05-04

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A Child's Ability to Learn Emotion Understanding and Coping Strategies

Description

Self-regulation in the form of coping with emotions is something that most people have effectively adapted to by adulthood. This is an organically learned process that begins in early childhood

Self-regulation in the form of coping with emotions is something that most people have effectively adapted to by adulthood. This is an organically learned process that begins in early childhood through play, parenting, education, and peer interactions. This study examines whether six children aged 4-5 (M age= 4.72, SD= 0.372, 50% female, 100% Caucasian) are able to understand basic emotions and how to cope with them through one of two protocols. The conditions were either directive instruction or embodied cognition, and children were evaluated with a pre and post-test measure. Findings did not indicate any significant effect of the conditions on memorizing coping mechanisms, nor did it indicate that there was a significant improvement in emotion understanding following the sessions. These findings were limited by the sample size and participant interest.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017-12

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A critical literature review and case study of the 'draw and write' research technique

Description

The ‘draw and write’ research technique was developed as a bottom-up approach to gaining access to children’s ideas, experiences, and views of the world around them in areas such as

The ‘draw and write’ research technique was developed as a bottom-up approach to gaining access to children’s ideas, experiences, and views of the world around them in areas such as health, education, and social issues. While the technique may allow children to participate in research in a way that is less restrictive than other techniques, many critique the method for its adverse ethical concerns, validity, and issues of interpretation and analysis. This article reviews the ‘draw and write’ research technique and its common critiques as well as offers a case study of the ‘draw and write’ technique, performed with children in Acatenango, Guatemala, in order to validate the accuracy of the ‘draw and write’ technique in depicting specific quantitative results.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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The Effects of Interaction with Children in Symptoms of Depression in the Elderly

Description

The purpose of the study was to determine the impact of social interaction with children on the symptoms of depression in elderly participants at the John C. Lincoln Adult Day

The purpose of the study was to determine the impact of social interaction with children on the symptoms of depression in elderly participants at the John C. Lincoln Adult Day Healthcare center when compared to depressive symptoms in the elderly who do not regularly interact with children. This organization provides care to elderly members of the community in a dignified and stimulating manner. It allows caregivers of participants to take a break from day to day responsibilities while providing the participants with a safe and active environment. It shares premises with the Lincoln Learning Center, which is a care/educational facility for children ages 6 weeks to 12 years of age. The children and the elderly interact one day a week for half an hour in a planned activity in the Adult Day Healthcare Center. The Geriatric Depression Scale- Short Form was used to assess for presence of depressive symptoms in both the control group (those who did not regularly interact with children) and the experimental group (those who did regularly interact with the children). The scale consisted of 15 yes-or-no questions regarding the average emotions the participants experienced in a week. A total of 15 people participated in the study, eight in the control group and seven in the experimental group. Eight of the participants were male, seven were female and they ranged in age from 58 to 96 years old. An independent sample t-test was performed to assess the data for statistical significance.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

Theory of Mind Development in Middle Childhood

Description

How do children understand how others see the world? I examined correlations between 4-8 year old children's understanding of beliefs and their understanding of other ways that people represent the

How do children understand how others see the world? I examined correlations between 4-8 year old children's understanding of beliefs and their understanding of other ways that people represent the world. Beliefs that I measured are understanding of pretense, understanding that things can have multiple identities, understanding that people can know things by inference, and understanding that people can look at the same thing and have different representations of it. I predicted that there would be correlations among these tasks. In particular, I predicted children would be able to understand these tasks when they understood true and false beliefs, based on current theories on belief understanding. I predicted that the classic false belief task alone would not be a good predictor of task performance, but that the combination of true and false belief tasks would. Participants were 100 children recruited at the Phoenix Children's Museum between ages 4 and 8. Previous research has found that children pass all of these tasks between the ages of 6 and 8, but no other studies have looked at the inter-correlations among them. Contrary to my prediction, children did not pass these tasks all at once, but scores went up gradually with age and belief understanding.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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Development of joint control during drawing movements in childhood

Description

Research on joint control during arm movements in adults has led to the development of the Leading Joint Hypothesis (LJH), which states that the central nervous system takes advantage of

Research on joint control during arm movements in adults has led to the development of the Leading Joint Hypothesis (LJH), which states that the central nervous system takes advantage of interaction torque (IT) and muscle torque (MT) to produce movements with maximum efficiency in the multi-jointed limbs of the human body. A gap in knowledge exists in determining how this mature pattern of joint control develops in children. Prior research focused on the kinematics of joint control for children below the age of three; however, not much is known about interjoint coordination with respect to MT and IT in school-aged children. In the present study, joint control at the shoulder, elbow, and wrist during drawing of five shapes was investigated. A random sample of nine typically developing children ages 6 to 12 served as subjects. The task was to trace with the index finger a template placed on a horizontal table. The template consisted of a circle, horizontal, vertical, right-diagonal, and left-diagonal line. Analysis of muscle torque contribution (MTC) revealed the individual roles of MT and IT in the shoulder, elbow, and wrist joints. During drawing of the horizontal line, which requires the most difficult joint control pattern in adults because it does not allow the use of IT for joint rotation, joint control was found to change through development. For the youngest children, the function of elbow MT modified to suppress IT, thereby producing large elbow rotation. The oldest children simplified this by using the shoulder as the principal joint of movement production and with decreased assistance from the elbow. For the other four drawing movements, differences in the pattern of joint control used by all of the subjects was unaffected by an increase in age. Overall, the results suggest that in children above 6 years of age, minor changes in joint control occur during drawing of relatively simple movements. The limited effect of age that was observed could be related to the restriction of movements to the horizontal plane. For a future study, three-dimensional movements that provide more freedom in joint control due to redundancy of degrees of freedom could be more informative about developmental changes in joint coordination.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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Measuring the Effects of Martial Arts and ADHD

Description

The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of a four-week martial arts program implemented once a week on children diagnosed with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) between the

The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of a four-week martial arts program implemented once a week on children diagnosed with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) between the ages of four and seven. This was a single group, pre- and post-intervention assessment pilot study. The total sample of the study was four children (n=4) and the martial arts classes were based on the Duke Kenpo Little Tiger Program by Jonathan Duke of Mesa, Arizona. Change was measured using the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function, 2nd edition (BRIEF-2) parental form and participants were encouraged to record at-home practice. Data were collected pre-intervention and four weeks afterwards. Limitations included small sample size, measurement limitation (e.g., ceiling effect), data based on parental report, a short intervention period, potential instructor bias, and uneven gender distribution. Given the small sample size (n=4), this study did not complete statistical analysis and alternatively described the changing patterns of the participant's ADHD symptoms from BRIEF-2 measures pre and post intervention. The results of this study could not generate the power to detect significance to state significant implications. However, the trends suggested that some participants declined in executive function in certain areas (e.g., task-monitoring and planning) and improved in other areas (e.g., working memory and organization of materials). All participants demonstrated improvement within the cognitive (CRI) scale of the BRIEF-2 and future studies may explore the potential for martial arts interventions in children under seven as a means to improve the cognitive aspect of executive function development. In addition, future studies may consider exploring the role of frequency versus time for at-home martial arts practice for children with ADHD under the age of seven.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017-12