Matching Items (9)

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Impact of a Comprehensive Sexual Health History Taking Tool

Description

Obtaining a comprehensive sexual health history is an important part of the patient history taking process and is essential to providing high-quality, patient-centered, and accessible healthcare. Information gathered from the

Obtaining a comprehensive sexual health history is an important part of the patient history taking process and is essential to providing high-quality, patient-centered, and accessible healthcare. Information gathered from the sexual health history guides delivery of appropriate education about prevention, counseling, treatment, and care. A federally qualified health center (FQHC) reported that they did not have a standardized comprehensive sexual health history taking process. To address this concern, a literature review was conducted to survey current evidence regarding both patient and healthcare provider perspective on sexual health history taking. While it is recommended for a sexual health history to be performed routinely, both healthcare providers and patients have reported sexual health is not discussed at most visits.

The findings led to the initiation of an evidence-based project implementing a comprehensive sexual health history taking tool at the FQHC. The tool assists in obtaining a comprehensive sexual history and provides an understanding of the sexual practices of the patients. If healthcare providers become aware of the sexual practices of their patients, they are better able to provide evidence-based education that could lead to better health outcomes. The participants reported they liked being asked about their sexual health, did not find the questions too personal, and reported the questionnaire addressed their sexual health concerns, and was worth their time. Taking a comprehensive sexual health history is a fundamental skill that all healthcare providers must strive to improve for the general health of their patients and the community.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05-04

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Exposing Women's Experiences with Von Willebrand Disease: A Case Study of Online Support Groups

Description

This research explores the unique and complicated experiences of women living with Von Willebrand Disease (VWD). VWD occurs with quantitative or qualitative deficiencies in Von Willebrand Factor—a key protein involved

This research explores the unique and complicated experiences of women living with Von Willebrand Disease (VWD). VWD occurs with quantitative or qualitative deficiencies in Von Willebrand Factor—a key protein involved in blood clotting. While VWD affects men and women, women often suffer harsher complications because of menstruation, childbirth, and other women’s health issues. Using online VWD support groups, this research recognizes and attempts to understand the common experiences of women with VWD. Availability of Care, Motherhood, Community and Sisterhood, Girlhood, Sexual Health and Reproductive Health, and Stigma were the six common themes found within these online support groups. Women in these groups corroborate the current understandings of women-specific experiences with VWD: particularly, heavy menstruation, postpartum hemorrhaging, diagnostic difficulties, treatment complications, and implications of an overall lower quality of life. However, these women also report VWD-induced complications with sexual health, mental health, care when trying to conceive, misinterpretations of bruising, constraints on healthcare availability, and the stigma associated with heavy menstruation. These findings address gaps in the literature and identify new areas for further research. Ideally, these conclusions will provide educational materials for healthcare professionals, government legislatures, and families to better support women and girls with VWD.
Keywords: Von Willebrand disease, women’s health, sexual health, mental health, reproductive health, phenomenology, and stigma

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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Lay Perspectives of Menarche, Contraceptives, and Reproductive Health among Urban Women & Informal Methods of Sexual Health Education in Dakar, Senegal

Description

In this study, I aim to understand general knowledge of menstruation and reproductive health among women who live and work in Dakar, Senegal. While there is an established nationalized sex

In this study, I aim to understand general knowledge of menstruation and reproductive health among women who live and work in Dakar, Senegal. While there is an established nationalized sex education curriculum and robust HIV prevention campaigns, there is nonetheless an unmet need for sexual health education in Senegal and limited access to family planning services in low-income communities. I examine data obtained from surveys conducted with participants selected using convenience sampling in five different neighborhoods in Dakar, as well as ethnographic observations during the four month period of study. Qualitative and quantitative analyses address women's comforts levels during menstruation, barriers to access of high quality menstrual care products, familiarity with different kinds of contraceptive methods, and information on where women receive information regarding puberty, sex, and menstruation. Results show that most participants seek out family members, female friends and other respected members in the community for reproductive development information. National programs and international organizations sponsor youth to become community educators, who offer an informal and more accessible method of education. Earlier research shows that informal methods of education can be extremely effective ; in the setting of Dakar, young health educators are also creating inclusive and safe spaces for meaningful discussions about sexuality to be held, combating the negative effects of the traditional patriarchal and conservative culture. Relationships with one's community are extremely important, and can be an invaluable resource in transmitting sexual and reproductive health information to women. Improved understanding of reproductive health among women in Senegal can encourage them to make informed decisions about family planning.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

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Sexual Health Needs Assessment at ASU

Description

Arizona State University (ASU) has experienced an increase of sexually transmitted infections, has a reputation of a large population of students with sexually transmitted infections, and does not provide any

Arizona State University (ASU) has experienced an increase of sexually transmitted infections, has a reputation of a large population of students with sexually transmitted infections, and does not provide any form of required sexual health education to its students in order to reduce this health risk. This study conducted focus group research amongst ASU female students to determine their opinions, experience, and comfort level with sexual health education information as well as their opinion of an ASU mandated sexual health education module. The research showed a desire for more information on sexuality, psychology, hormones, anatomy, and sexually transmitted infections. The participants also expressed support for an ASU sexual health training module though there was debate as to whether or not to make the module mandatory.
The ASU student body is primarily young students who are making some of the first adult decisions of their lives and the majority have come from backgrounds lacking in sexual health education. The way to ensure the health and safety of these students is to give them the information they need to make educated decisions regarding their health and their relationships. This thesis concludes that ASU should mandate a sexual health education training module in the form of a semester long class, in-person or online, with small classes of 5-15 students each in order to improve the health of the ASU community.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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The Impact of Cultural Perceptions on Contraceptive Use Among Young Mexican- American Women

Description

Existing knowledge of Latina sexual health disparities has been discussed through traditional barriers such as financial, language, or location. Contraceptive use is proven to greater economic, social, and health outcomes

Existing knowledge of Latina sexual health disparities has been discussed through traditional barriers such as financial, language, or location. Contraceptive use is proven to greater economic, social, and health outcomes across women of all racial and ethnic backgrounds. This study aims to explore another factor, specifically among young Mexican-American women – whether or not cultural perceptions on sexual health impact the decision to use contraception. In- depth qualitative interviews were conducted among first-generation Mexican-American women ages 18-25 residing in Arizona. The results show that while negative cultural perceptions faced additional barriers in seeking contraception, it was not a complete deterrent for any participant. If anything, this motivated participants to actively destigmatize sexual health in their communities by speaking more openly about their experiences with others.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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Sexual Health in Adolescents: A study in unplanned adolescent pregnancies and the correlation with sexual education in Sonora, Mexico

Description

In Mexico, the female adolescent population is made up from two groups, single women and married or cohabitating women. Throughout the past decade there has been an increase in the

In Mexico, the female adolescent population is made up from two groups, single women and married or cohabitating women. Throughout the past decade there has been an increase in the fertility rate amongst the adolescent population in the state of Sonora. Several factors were analyzed to determine their impact on adolescent fertility rate and unplanned pregnancies but ultimately it was found that sexual education was the most influential factor. Comprehensive sexual education has been found to decrease the number of adolescent pregnancies in schools or cities where that curriculum is taught. Many experts believe that this occurs because adolescents are better educated in the proper usage of contraception. Increased contraceptive use directly causes a decrease in unplanned pregnancy rate. With respect to Mexico, it was found that comprehensive sexual education is taught in Sonora but there is no standardized program. Few institutions provide comprehensive sexual education and the programs range between a level 0 and level 3 with respect to the strictness of the abstinence only curricula. Four interviews were conducted between December of 2013 and March of 2014. The purpose of the interviews was to gain a better understanding about how sexual education is perceived in Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico and what sort of programs are available to adolescents. The questions that comprised the interview consisted of three general parts: background, demographics and sexual education. The interviewees were selected based on their level of expertise reproductive health among adolescents. Two programs were selected for research: Programa Gente Joven (PGJ) and Vive Prevenido. Based on research and data analysis several conclusions were reached. The average age a Mexican woman first has sex, gets married and has her first child within less than 5 years starting in their adolescence. Many years pass between the age of a woman's first childbirth and when she first uses contraception. This is caused by an unmet or unsatisfied need for contraception where the national level is higher than that of Sonora. With respect to sexual education the Guttmacher Institute data suggests that comprehensive sexual education is more effective than abstinence only education. And finally, the experts interviewed all agreed that comprehensive sexual education is what should be taught on a state wide level. The views and opinions of these four interviewees do not reflect those of all who work with adolescents. To gain a more generalized idea on the situation surrounding unplanned pregnancies in adolescents more interviews would need to be conducted. This project was purely exploratory and does not aim to analyze or evaluate either program.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

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The impact of men's labor migration on the sexual and reproductive health of their left-behind wives in Tajikistan

Description

ABSTRACT

The aim of the study is to examine the impact of international male labor migration on the sexual and reproductive health of women who stay back home in Tajikistan. The

ABSTRACT

The aim of the study is to examine the impact of international male labor migration on the sexual and reproductive health of women who stay back home in Tajikistan. The data for this study was gathered as a result of ethnographic field works conducted on several occasions from 2011 to 2013.

The results of the study suggest that male migration does not have an impact on fertility levels of the left-behind women. Although similarly to previous studies this study shows that wives of migrants are less likely to use contraception, it nevertheless demonstrates changes in contraceptive behaviors of wives of migrants such as seasonal removal and insertion of an intrauterine device (IUD) and shift from long-term to short-term contraception use. However, despite the availability of numerous forms of contraception in the country, the pattern of contraceptive use such as the reliance on IUDs dominant during the Soviet period continues to exist among wives of non-migrants. One of the most important findings of this study is women’s ability to use condoms for a short term with husbands after their return and asking spouses to have an HIV test. This finding challenges the dominant discourses in HIV and migration literature focusing on the inability, impossibility and failure on the part of the wives to negotiate HIV prevention due to various factors impeding the promotion of HIV prevention skills and measures among women.

Moreover, the study demonstrates that, on the one hand, male migration worsens reproductive health of the left-behind women, but, on the other hand, it improves/increases their access to reproductive health institutions thanks to remittances. Although self-reported symptoms of women show a slight difference in reproductive morbidity, including STIs of wives of migrants and non-migrants, health care providers believe that this difference is significant and wives of migrants are more likely to have complications during pregnancy, delivery and post-delivery periods.

The study also shows that the majority of HIV prevention and family planning programs target only wives of migrants and non-migrants, however it is crucial that migrant men should also be targets of these programs.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015

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A qaualitative descriptive study of women's sexual health in the context of intimate partner violence

Description

Female survivors of intimate partner violence (IPV) are at increased risk for negative sexual health outcomes, such as susceptibility to HIV/AIDS, other sexually transmitted infections, unintended pregnancy, miscarriage, and cervical

Female survivors of intimate partner violence (IPV) are at increased risk for negative sexual health outcomes, such as susceptibility to HIV/AIDS, other sexually transmitted infections, unintended pregnancy, miscarriage, and cervical cancer. Despite this known risk, HIV risk reduction interventions are lacking in IPV content, and little is known about women’s protective sexual health behaviors in this context. The purpose of this dissertation is to gain a deeper understanding of women’s sexual health within the context of a violent intimate relationship. Data were collected through semi-structured, in-person interviews with women who had experienced IPV (N = 28). Service-seeking women were recruited from a domestic violence shelter and a domestic violence counseling program; non-service-seeking women were recruited through a statewide coalition against domestic violence and online advertisements. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and then analyzed in NVivo Qualitative Software (Version 10). Detailed process notes, analytic memos, peer debriefing, and the use of visual analytic displays were used to increase the trustworthiness of findings. Results are presented in chapters two, three, and four. Chapter two explores women’s experiences of sexual violence in IPV relationships. Women described how their intimate partners used a combination of sexual abuse, sexual coercion, and sexual assault as a unique weapon of power and control. Chapter three examines women’s sexual risks across the levels of their ecological environment using an intersectional feminist framework. Women’s sexual risks went beyond sexual violence and were influenced by subtle yet pervasive cultural gender norms that reduced their power in relation to their male sexual partners. Chapter four focuses on understanding women’s protective sexual health behaviors in order to inform the development of an intervention that follows women’s natural pathway to care as they heal from victimization to surviving to thriving.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016

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Breaking the silence: reinforcing and resisting gender norms through women's masturbation

Description

Based on the Foucauldian understanding that sexuality discourse operates as a powerful instrument for the regulation of societies and individuals, this research considers how internalized gender and sexuality discourses affect

Based on the Foucauldian understanding that sexuality discourse operates as a powerful instrument for the regulation of societies and individuals, this research considers how internalized gender and sexuality discourses affect young women's embodied experiences of masturbation, and more broadly their sexual subjectivity and health. Drawing on interdisciplinary feminist perspectives on gender, sexuality, health, and embodiment, I examine female sexual health within a positive rights framework. That is, I view the rights to both sexual safety and pleasure as essential components of female sexual health, and conceptualize girls and young women as potential sexual agents. By asking young women about their lived experiences of self-pleasure, this research challenges not only the historical legacy of pathologizing female desire and pleasure, but also scholars' tendency to construct female sexuality solely in a heteronormative, partnered context. Based on focus groups, interviews, journals, and questionnaires collected from 109 female college students from diverse ethnic, religious, and sexuality backgrounds in Arizona and Michigan, I employ grounded theory to analyze individual feelings and experiences in the context of larger societal discourses. My findings indicate that when girls internalize negative discourses about masturbation (e.g. as sin or secular stigma), general heteronormative sexuality discourses, and a silence around female self-pleasure, there are severe negative consequences for how they understand and experience masturbation. I argue that they engage in sexual self-surveillance that often results in emotional and physical struggles, as well as the re-inscription of hegemonic cultural discourses on female masturbation, bodies, desire, and pleasure. By illustrating how even the most private and `invisible' behavior of masturbation can become a site for regulating female sexuality, this research provides important evidence of the power of increasingly covert mechanisms to govern gendered bodies and subjectivities through self-surveillance. Alternatively, this research also highlights the potential of normalizing self-pleasure for increasing girls' and young women's capacity for resisting oppressive gender and sexuality discourses and behaviors, developing an agentic sexual subjectivity, and feeling sexually empowered. Thus, this research also has practical implications for conceptualizing sexual health for girls and young women in a way that includes the rights to sexual safety and pleasure.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014