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Human Papillomavirus Education in Military Service Members

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The human papillomavirus (HPV) is a sexually transmitted infection (STI) that is associated with several types of cancer and genital warts. No cure exists for those currently infected with HPV, but a vaccine is available that can prevent the virus

The human papillomavirus (HPV) is a sexually transmitted infection (STI) that is associated with several types of cancer and genital warts. No cure exists for those currently infected with HPV, but a vaccine is available that can prevent the virus and development of cancers associated with HPV. Military servicemembers are at a high risk for contracting HPV; it is one of the most common STIs among active duty service members. The health consequences of HPV can impact a servicemember’s military readiness. The HPV vaccine is not required for military servicemembers, but it is offered free of charge. HPV vaccination rates among military service members remain relatively low.

The purpose of this evidence-based project was to increase the level of knowledge about HPV, improve health beliefs regarding HPV, increase HPV vaccine intention, recommendation, and uptake. Using the Health Belief Model as an organizing framework, a population targeted eight-minute education video on HPV and HPV vaccination was developed. It was implemented at an outpatient military treatment facility located in the southwest United States over a 6-week period, to newly reported service members. Participants included 116 military service members aged 18 to 45. A pretest and posttest questionnaire were used to assess the impact of the intervention. HPV level of knowledge increased significantly from pretest to posttest mean scores were 3.00 to 4.39 respectively (p < .001). HPV vaccine intention increased from 62% to 66% (p = .739). HPV vaccine recommendation increased from 62% to 85% (p < .001).

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2020-04-28

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Evaluating the viability of a DNA-based chip targeted for C. trachomatis, N. gonorrhoeae, and other pathogens of interest

Description

Sexually transmitted diseases like gonorrhea and chlamydia, standardly treated with antibiotics, produce over 1.2 million cases annually in the emergency department (Jenkins et al., 2013). To determine a need for antibiotics, hospital labs utilize bacterial cultures to isolate and identify

Sexually transmitted diseases like gonorrhea and chlamydia, standardly treated with antibiotics, produce over 1.2 million cases annually in the emergency department (Jenkins et al., 2013). To determine a need for antibiotics, hospital labs utilize bacterial cultures to isolate and identify possible pathogens. Unfortunately, this technique can take up to 72 hours, leading to several physicians presumptively treating patients based solely on history and physical presentation. With vague standards for diagnosis and a high percentage of asymptomatic carriers, several patients undergo two scenarios; over- or under-treatment. These two scenarios can lead to consequences like unnecessary exposure to antibiotics and development of secondary conditions (for example: pelvic inflammatory disease, infertility, etc.). This presents a need for a laboratory technique that can provide reliable results in an efficient matter. The viability of DNA-based chip targeted for C. trachomatis, N. gonorrhoeae, and other pathogens of interest were evaluated. The DNA-based chip presented several advantages as it can be easily integrated as a routine test given the process is already well-known, is customizable and able to target multiple pathogens within a single test and has the potential to return results within a few hours as opposed to days. As such, implementation of a DNA-based chip as a diagnostic tool is a timely and potentially impactful investigation.

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2016-12