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Arizona Nurses Association Member Involvement in Public Policy

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The purpose of the study was to determine the level and type of public policy involvement among registered nurses (RN) who are members of the Arizona Nurses Association (AzNA). Furthermore, the aim of the study was to identify the knowledge

The purpose of the study was to determine the level and type of public policy involvement among registered nurses (RN) who are members of the Arizona Nurses Association (AzNA). Furthermore, the aim of the study was to identify the knowledge base and motivation of nurses and their involvement in public policy as well as the barriers and benefits. A 20- item survey was sent to all of the members of AzNA. There were 39 responses used in the analysis. The highest reported public policy activities in which the nurses had participated were: voted (90%), contacted a public official (51%), and gave money to a campaign or for a public policy concern (46%). Lack of time was the most frequently reported barrier to involvement and improving the health of the public was the most frequently reported benefit to involvement. The number of public policy education/information sources and the highest level of education positively correlate to the nurses' total number of public policy activities (r = .627 p <0.05; r = .504, p <0.05). Based on the results of stepwise linear regression analysis, the participants' age, number of education/information sources, and efficacy expectation predict 68.8% of involvement in public policy activities. The greater the number of education/information sources, the greater the number of public policy activities nurses report having participated in.

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2015-12

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Reproductive Health Equity: One Key Question© for Women in Recovery

Description

Women in recovery from substance use disorders (SUD) face significant barriers to achieving reproductive well-being (RWB) and disproportionately experience unintended pregnancy. Unintended pregnancy can have serious consequences in this population. Equity-informed approaches promote the integration of reproductive health care (RHC)

Women in recovery from substance use disorders (SUD) face significant barriers to achieving reproductive well-being (RWB) and disproportionately experience unintended pregnancy. Unintended pregnancy can have serious consequences in this population. Equity-informed approaches promote the integration of reproductive health care (RHC) with recovery programs to improve both access to and quality of RHC. Arizona’s largest SUD recovery program, Crossroads, Inc. recently opened an on-site, integrated primary clinic offering RHC. A one-month pilot demonstration of One Key Question (OKQ), a pregnancy desire screening tool, was implemented with fidelity at Crossroads to identify clients with RHC needs and offer care.

IRB exempt status was obtained through Arizona State University. All female-bodied clients aged 18-49 were screened following routine admission assessments. The Institute for Healthcare Improvement Triple Aim model based on Self-Determination Theory and Motivational Interviewing was used to prioritize client autonomy. The client experience of care was measured using an adapted Interpersonal Quality of Family Planning scale. The magnitude of needs and desires were summarized with descriptive statistics. Sixty-three clients were screened with OKQ. Needs were identified in 97% of clients. Of those clients, 98% accepted referrals. Ninety percent of items measuring the client experience of care were rated as “excellent.” OKQ provided an efficient structure for person-centered screening and referral conversations to integrate RHC in a large SUD recovery program with excellent care experiences reported by clients.

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2020-05-05

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Improving Postpartum Follow-Up Through Enhanced Prenatal Education and Concurrent Scheduling with a One-Month Well Baby Visit

Description

Stress of transitioning to parenthood, hormonal fluctuations as well as physical changes, and complications during postpartum could be addressed at the routine postpartum follow-up visit to avoid long-term adverse effects. While emphasis on preconception and prenatal care has increased nationwide,

Stress of transitioning to parenthood, hormonal fluctuations as well as physical changes, and complications during postpartum could be addressed at the routine postpartum follow-up visit to avoid long-term adverse effects. While emphasis on preconception and prenatal care has increased nationwide, attendance at this important visit is on the decline. The purpose of this project was to investigate how enhanced prenatal education and concurrent scheduling of a well-baby visit at four weeks, instead of the traditional six weeks, could increase adherence to recommended follow-up care at a federally qualified health clinic in the Southwestern United States.

The Theory of Reasoned Action guided the intervention while Rosswurum and Larrabee’s evidence-based practice model was used to develop the project. The pre-existing weekly prenatal education program was enhanced with information regarding the importance of a four-week postpartum follow-up visit. Front desk schedulers were educated to offer same day appointments for the postpartum care visit and one-month well-baby appointment. Data collection took place for three months after implementation of the project and was compared to adherence rates during the three months prior to the intervention. Providers and scheduling staff members participated in a short post-intervention interview. Prenatal education and convenience of concurrent scheduling increased the percentage of adherence to follow-up visits over a three-month period. Providers and clinic staff recommend continuing with the process changes to increase patient’s access to family centered care.

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Date Created
2017-05-01