Matching Items (4)

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Reproductive Health Equity: One Key Question© for Women in Recovery

Description

Women in recovery from substance use disorders (SUD) face significant barriers to achieving reproductive well-being (RWB) and disproportionately experience unintended pregnancy. Unintended pregnancy can have serious consequences in this population.

Women in recovery from substance use disorders (SUD) face significant barriers to achieving reproductive well-being (RWB) and disproportionately experience unintended pregnancy. Unintended pregnancy can have serious consequences in this population. Equity-informed approaches promote the integration of reproductive health care (RHC) with recovery programs to improve both access to and quality of RHC. Arizona’s largest SUD recovery program, Crossroads, Inc. recently opened an on-site, integrated primary clinic offering RHC. A one-month pilot demonstration of One Key Question (OKQ), a pregnancy desire screening tool, was implemented with fidelity at Crossroads to identify clients with RHC needs and offer care.

IRB exempt status was obtained through Arizona State University. All female-bodied clients aged 18-49 were screened following routine admission assessments. The Institute for Healthcare Improvement Triple Aim model based on Self-Determination Theory and Motivational Interviewing was used to prioritize client autonomy. The client experience of care was measured using an adapted Interpersonal Quality of Family Planning scale. The magnitude of needs and desires were summarized with descriptive statistics. Sixty-three clients were screened with OKQ. Needs were identified in 97% of clients. Of those clients, 98% accepted referrals. Ninety percent of items measuring the client experience of care were rated as “excellent.” OKQ provided an efficient structure for person-centered screening and referral conversations to integrate RHC in a large SUD recovery program with excellent care experiences reported by clients.

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Date Created
  • 2020-05-05

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Substance Use Disorder Relapse and Readmission

Description

According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), tobacco, alcohol, and illicit drugs accounted for 820 billion dollars in costs related to crime, lost work productivity, and health care

According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), tobacco, alcohol, and illicit drugs accounted for 820 billion dollars in costs related to crime, lost work productivity, and health care services. Nearly 20 million Americans suffer from substance misuse, but only 3.7 million received treatment. Of those who receive treatment, the risk of relapse is high, ranging from 40-60% within a year of treatment. Improvement in the treatment of substance use disorders (SUD) is necessary to improve the health of our society.

Current literature demonstrates that individualized recovery plans and follow-up care are effective in reducing relapse and readmission. Costs to the individual, institution, and healthcare system can be reduced. This project aimed to decrease the risk for relapse and readmission with recovery plan reviews at 72hrs, and two-weeks, post-discharge. The risk of relapse was measured by the Time-To-Relapse questionnaire and the UCLA loneliness scale. The project took place in a residential treatment facility in Phoenix, Arizona. There were five participants initially; two were lost at the two-week follow-up. Pre and post-test results were compared to measure potential predictability of relapse. The two-tailed paired samples t-test was performed to compare the means of the scores but yielded insignificant results.

All participants maintained sobriety. Qualitative data via interview showed positive results demonstrated by statements from the participants. Recovery plan review with follow-up care is a promising evidence-based practice that can be implemented to help individuals maintain sobriety. Additional research is recommended to examine further the impact on the maintenance of sobriety over time.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05-03

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Improving the Care Transition to Outpatient Aftercare Services Following Addiction Treatment

Description

The chronic nature of substance use disorder requires continuity of care after residential treatment. Only a small proportion of patients, however, adhere to aftercare follow-up plans and the relapse rates

The chronic nature of substance use disorder requires continuity of care after residential treatment. Only a small proportion of patients, however, adhere to aftercare follow-up plans and the relapse rates remain between 40- 80% within a year post-discharge. Synthesis of evidence showed that facilitated referral (FR) significantly increased follow- up adherence and resulted to positive outcomes. The study aimed to examine the effectiveness of FR in improving access, follow-up adherence and engagement to aftercare services, and relapse rate after a month post- discharge.

After the Institutional Review Board approval, 30 participants were recruited in two residential treatment facilities. Questionnaires, the Assessment of Warning Signs of Relapse and Health leads surveys were utilized to collect data. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, McNemar, and Wilcoxon signed rank tests. Results showed that FR significantly increased access to many community aftercare services (p<.05). A significant reduction in relapse risk post-intervention was also noted (Z= -3.180, p= .001). Additionally, most participants discharged with scheduled appointments followed-up and had continued engagement with aftercare services. Eight participants maintained sobriety and 18 were lost to follow-up a month post-discharge, while four relapsed in the facility.

Overall, FR increased access to needed aftercare services and significantly decreased the relapse percentage risk post-discharge. FR is a promising intervention that can be implemented for practice. Future research is recommended to further examine the correlation with follow-up adherence and continuous engagement to aftercare services, and relapse rate at 30 days after discharge.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-04-29

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Self-Help Mindfulness Group to Increase Mindfulness and Improve Stress Management in Those with Substance Use Disorders

Description

Stress is the direct source of some health issues and the precursors to many illnesses. The effects of stress are felt by the majority of the population and is usually

Stress is the direct source of some health issues and the precursors to many illnesses. The effects of stress are felt by the majority of the population and is usually undertreated or overlooked as a norm of life rather than a potential source of illness. Though everyone has different thresholds of stress, chronic or constant stress is debilitating for some and can manifest itself in limitless ways. For adults with substance use disorders (SUDs), research supports that mindfulness based interventions (MBIs) could be beneficial for stress management. The techniques incorporated in mindfulness based practices can decrease the baseline stress of its practitioners by increasing their awareness and mindfulness within daily life and during stressful situations.

This increase in awareness and mindfulness has shown numerous benefits that may be crucial in increasing the likelihood of sobriety for those with SUDs. Some of these benefits may include, improved stress management, improved mitigation of craving symptoms, reduced incidences of relapse, and a better quality of life. A 4-week self-help mindfulness pilot program was conducted twice within two separate residential substance recovery settings. The participant’s satisfaction and the internalization of mindfulness concepts were measured within the pre and post implementation of a self-help mindfulness class. In the pilot program, participants rated high satisfaction of the mindfulness class and showed increased levels of mindfulness through the use of the client satisfaction questionnaire (CSQ-8) and the five facets of mindfulness questionnaire (FFMQ-39).

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05-01