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Digital Storytelling | Unlocking The Key Elements to Effective Ads

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Abstract

My thesis aims to uncover the ultimate strategy behind short form visual stories, otherwise known as the digital advertisment. In this thesis, I analyze traditional storytelling, visual storytelling, and short-form visual storytelling in order to uncover the best practices advertisers

Abstract

My thesis aims to uncover the ultimate strategy behind short form visual stories, otherwise known as the digital advertisment. In this thesis, I analyze traditional storytelling, visual storytelling, and short-form visual storytelling in order to uncover the best practices advertisers should use when crafting a digital advertisement. 

Storytelling “reveals elements and images of a story while also catalyzing the imagination of the listener” (National Storytelling Network, 2017).  This tradition has two purposes for society: a neurological structure, and a social mechanism (for historic preservation, human interaction, and a vehicle for connecting with others) (Gottshcall, 2012; Scott, 2012; Paul, 2012; Woodside, 2008). 

Visual Storytelling is “using photography, illustration, video, (usually with a musical enhancement) to guide” the human brain along a plotline, and has an unlimited timeframe (Ron, 2017). There are seven key elements to effective visual storytelling: A listener/audience, an element of realism coupled with escapism, a focus on the dread of life, an element of the unknown, emotion, simplicity, and a three-part plot structure (Andrews, 2010; ProQuest, 2012; Zak, 2014; Stanton, 2014; Reagan, 2016; Jarvis, 2014; Petrick, 2014)

In the words of Sholmi Ron, from a marketing perspective, “Visual [short hand] Storytelling is a marketing strategy that communicates powerful ideas through a compelling story arc, with your customer at the heart of the story, and delivered through interactive and immersive visual media – in order to create profitable customer engagements" (Ron, 2017). This advertising strategy has four best practices: non-obvious logo placement, a comedic emotion, multiple emotional arcs, and a relevant message (Golan, 2017; Teixeira, 2015; Graves, 2017, Teixeira, 2017). These are important to understand because, in 2017, online consumers can be described as skeptical, conscious of content, individualistic, and drawn to authenticity (Teixeira, 2014). 

To supplement my findings, I conducted primary research by analyzing the 2017 Super Bowl videos against a criteria created using the best practices previously identified (in Part 1 and Part 2). Through the data collection of the 66 videos, I uncovered the most popular plotline is "fall than rise," the most popular emotions are humor, inspiration, and empathy and people tend to have a preference towards videos that are more realistic and simplistic in nature. 

In the end, I recommend that advertisers identify an authentic yet relevant message, while employing a comedic, inspirational, or empathic tone, and that they place their ads exclusively for their target market. Additionally, producers should use a fall then rise plotline (with multiple mini plot peaks and valleys), a "logo-pulsing" strategy, and a minimal amount of characters and settings to keep the audience's focus on the ad’s message.

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Created

Date Created
2017-05

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Women's Challenges and Best Practices for Success in the Financial Industry

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Over a twelve-month period I completed industry research on women working in the financial industry. I then compiled a set of 17 qualitative questions with a focus on career development, leadership, compensation, and best practices for women working in the

Over a twelve-month period I completed industry research on women working in the financial industry. I then compiled a set of 17 qualitative questions with a focus on career development, leadership, compensation, and best practices for women working in the financial industry in order to complete my own study. I focused my time and energy on ten women working in the finance in Arizona. I completed one hour interviews with each woman in order to gain an understanding of the challenges women face in the workforce today. I have learned that gender bias is still very prevalent in the financial industry. Seven out of the ten women I spoke to labeled it as an obstacle during their career. The wage gap in finance continues to exist and I believe this is due to a culture of secrecy in the workforce and the discouragement of negotiation. The women I interviewed focused on communal leadership skills such as encouragement, empathy, and team success. This is a benefit today as the workplace culture changes these leadership strategies are extremely affective. Although gender discrimination is still prevalent, there are many promising signs for women entering the financial industry. Women as a whole are very satisfied with their careers and recommend the field to other young women starting off. Ten out of ten of the women I interviewed believe that being female in a male dominated workforce can be a benefit. If you work hard and demonstrate successful leadership abilities it can be easier to stand out. It is definitely possible to have a fulfilling career in the financial industry, but you have to define success in your own terms and make time for the activities and people you enjoy. I hope that my research will impact other young women to continue to pave the way of success for women in the financial industry.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2015-05

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The Confidence Gap: How Women Hold Themselves Back in the Business World

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I will explore that confidence gap between men and women and how it holds women back in a male-dominated business world. Then, I will give recommendations to businesswomen and managers to overcome the confidence gap. Everyone knows that women on

I will explore that confidence gap between men and women and how it holds women back in a male-dominated business world. Then, I will give recommendations to businesswomen and managers to overcome the confidence gap. Everyone knows that women on average get paid less per dollar than men. Clearly, this is partly due to a social ill that discriminates against women. However, I am not the type of person to sit back and wait for things to change. As a young woman graduating Barrett and moving onto law school, I wanted to explore what I myself can do to combat disadvantages I may encounter in the corporate world. My objective is to investigate the differences between men and women in the business world using the book, The Confidence Code, by Katty Kay and Claire Shipman as a framework for discussion. Is there a confidence gap between males and females and how is that hindering the latter in the workplace? Next, I will discuss why it is important for businesses to even care about having women on their teams at all. Finally, I will explore possible ways to build self-confidence in women in order to make them more successful in their careers. I will give recommendations to businesswomen themselves and to businesses in general to achieve this goal. For the purposes of this thesis, I will define confidence in business as "the belief that one is able to succeed at something" and furthermore, "the act of actually trying to be successful at something". To take it a step further, confidence also means being resilient instead of discouraged in the face of failure. Self-confidence is absolutely essential to a successful career as a businessperson. It is necessary to build skills such as: speaking up, sharing ideas, negotiating, applying for jobs, positions, projects, and promotions, not letting others intimidate you, not feeling the need to unnecessarily apologize, and to be proactive instead of hesitant. I found that part of the reason for the wage gap and why there are so few women CEOs is due to women's lack of confidence. For example, women do not initiate salary negotiations as often as men do and they ask for significantly less money when they do. Women will not apply for promotions unless they feel 100% qualified while men will go for it if they feel they have about half the qualifications. Then I decided to do research on whether or not women are as confident as men- and the answer is absolutely yes. Companies with more women in leadership positions outperform companies without. Men and women generally produce the same results but women still doubt themselves more. Finally, it turns out women actually have more effective leadership strategies then men. The confidence gap is due to many biological, psychological, and sociological factors. At the beginning of my research, I was frustrated by what I was finding. But the good news is that there are many ways women can overcome the confidence gap through reframing, taking action, and practice. There are ways businesses can foster a culture that meets the needs of women in a previously male dominated space. This information is empowering and I hope my thesis can help other women the way it has helped me.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2016-05