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Health Disparities Among LGB Women From Experiences With Their Healthcare Providers

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This study investigates how the patient-provider relationship between lesbian, gay, and bisexual women and their healthcare providers influences their access to, utilization of, and experiences within healthcare environments. Nineteen participants, ages 18 to 34, were recruited using convenience and snowball

This study investigates how the patient-provider relationship between lesbian, gay, and bisexual women and their healthcare providers influences their access to, utilization of, and experiences within healthcare environments. Nineteen participants, ages 18 to 34, were recruited using convenience and snowball sampling. Interviews were conducted inquiring about their health history and their experiences within the healthcare system in the context of their sexual orientation. The data collected from these interviews was used to create an analysis of the healthcare experiences of those who identify as queer. Although the original intention of the project was to chronicle the experiences of LGB women specifically, there were four non-binary gender respondents who contributed interviews. In an effort to not privilege any orientation over another, the respondents were collectively referred to as queer, given the inclusive and an encompassing nature of the term. The general conclusion of this study is that respondents most often experienced heterosexism rather than outright homophobia when accessing healthcare. If heterosexism was present within the healthcare setting, it made respondents feel uncomfortable with their providers and less likely to inform them of their sexuality even if it was medically relevant to their health outcomes. Gender, race, and,socioeconomic differences also had an effect on the patient-provider relationship. Non-binary respondents acknowledged the need for inclusion of more gender options outside of male or female on the reporting forms often seen in medical offices. By doing so, medical professionals are acknowledging their awareness and knowledge of people outside of the binary gender system, thus improving the experience of these patients. While race and socioeconomic status were less relevant to the context of this study, it was found that these factors have an affect on the patient-provider relationship. There are many suggestions for providers to improve the experiences of queer patients within the healthcare setting. This includes nonverbal indications of acknowledgement and acceptance, such as signs in the office that indicate it to be a queer friendly space. This will help in eliminating the fear and miscommunication that can often happen when a queer patient sees a practitioner for the first time. In addition, better education on medically relevant topics to queer patients, is necessary in order to eliminate disparities in health outcomes. This is particularly evident in trans health, where specialized education is necessary in order to decrease poor health outcomes in trans patients. Future directions of this study necessitate a closer look on how race and socioeconomic status have an effect on a queer patient's relationship with their provider.

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2016-05

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Comparative Nursing Education in the US and UK

Description

I conducted a qualitative, comparative study on the nursing education systems in the United Kingdom and the United States, focusing on two universities—Arizona State University in Phoenix, Arizona and Leeds Beckett University in Leeds, England. The goals of my thesis

I conducted a qualitative, comparative study on the nursing education systems in the United Kingdom and the United States, focusing on two universities—Arizona State University in Phoenix, Arizona and Leeds Beckett University in Leeds, England. The goals of my thesis included comparing the educational, economic, and cultural aspects of the countries and how those aspects impact nursing students on both sides of the pond. The educational and economic aspects were compared by utilizing existing literature and open data sources such as the university websites and publications from comparative education journals, while the cultural differences were evaluated by conducting short, one-on-one interviews with students enrolled in the Adult Health courses at both universities. The findings from the interviews were transcribed and coded, and findings from the sites were compared. While there is an extensive amount of research published regarding comparative education, there has not been much published comparing these developed countries. While there is a significant difference in the structure and cost of the nursing programs, there are more similarities than differences in culture between nursing students interviewed in the US and those interviewed in the UK.

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2016-05

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Addressing Implicit Bias in Mental Healthcare: A Novel Health Promotion Tool for the Treatment of Minority Mental Health Patients

Description

Minority mental health patients face many health inequities and inequalities that may stem from implicit bias and a lack of cultural awareness from their healthcare providers. I analyzed the current literature evaluating implicit bias among healthcare providers and culturally specific

Minority mental health patients face many health inequities and inequalities that may stem from implicit bias and a lack of cultural awareness from their healthcare providers. I analyzed the current literature evaluating implicit bias among healthcare providers and culturally specific life traumas that Latinos and African Americans face that can impact their mental health. Additionally, I researched a current mental health assessments tool, the Child and Adolescent Trauma Survey (CATS), and evaluated it for the use on Latino and African American patients. Face-to-face interviews with two healthcare providers were also used to analyze the CATS for its’ applicability to Latino and African American patients. Results showed that these assessments were not sufficient in capturing culturally specific life traumas of minority patients. Based on the literature review and analysis of the interviews with healthcare providers, a novel assessment tool, the Culturally Traumatic Events Questionnaire (CTEQ), was created to address the gaps that currently make up other mental health assessment tools used on minority patients.

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Date Created
2021-05

It's Okay Not to Be Okay: Mental Health in the Latinx Community

Description

The Latinx community faces several barriers that keep them from seeking mental health treatment. One of those barriers is the stigma experienced in the community. The purpose of this project is to create a culturally tailored animation to address the

The Latinx community faces several barriers that keep them from seeking mental health treatment. One of those barriers is the stigma experienced in the community. The purpose of this project is to create a culturally tailored animation to address the stigma associated with mental health in the Latinx community. The first part of the project, written about in this paper, focuses on gathering data from the community about their beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors regarding mental health, as well as the stigma they have witnessed and experienced. Information was gathered through a series of group and one-on-one interviews with Generation Z men and women that identified as Latinx. The preliminary results revealed that all participants agreed with the statement that mental health is stigmatized in their community and offered several reasons as to why this is the case. The majority of them also agreed that education is the best way to reduce the stigma, which is what we hope to achieve through an animation that will be created using the information provided by the community and the literature.

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Date Created
2021-05

"Everything is Just Right": A Children's Book for Understanding Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

Description

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder is a psychiatric disorder that affects 2-3% of children. OCD causes anxiety, fear, upsetting thoughts, and obsessions/compulsions. These symptoms can manifest in different ways and kids can become stuck in a stressful cycle of anxiety and the

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder is a psychiatric disorder that affects 2-3% of children. OCD causes anxiety, fear, upsetting thoughts, and obsessions/compulsions. These symptoms can manifest in different ways and kids can become stuck in a stressful cycle of anxiety and the need to act on compulsions. Currently on the children's book market, OCD is an underrepresented topic. I chose to design a children's book that tackles the stigma of OCD in a form that is easy for children to understand.

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Date Created
2022-05

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Raybon Final Project (Spring 2022)

Description

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder is a psychiatric disorder that affects 2-3% of children. OCD causes anxiety, fear, upsetting thoughts, and obsessions/compulsions. These symptoms can manifest in different ways and kids can become stuck in a stressful cycle of anxiety and the

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder is a psychiatric disorder that affects 2-3% of children. OCD causes anxiety, fear, upsetting thoughts, and obsessions/compulsions. These symptoms can manifest in different ways and kids can become stuck in a stressful cycle of anxiety and the need to act on compulsions. Currently on the children's book market, OCD is an underrepresented topic. I chose to design a children's book that tackles the stigma of OCD in a form that is easy for children to understand.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2022-05

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Raybon Book (Spring 2022)

Description

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder is a psychiatric disorder that affects 2-3% of children. OCD causes anxiety, fear, upsetting thoughts, and obsessions/compulsions. These symptoms can manifest in different ways and kids can become stuck in a stressful cycle of anxiety and the

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder is a psychiatric disorder that affects 2-3% of children. OCD causes anxiety, fear, upsetting thoughts, and obsessions/compulsions. These symptoms can manifest in different ways and kids can become stuck in a stressful cycle of anxiety and the need to act on compulsions. Currently on the children's book market, OCD is an underrepresented topic. I chose to design a children's book that tackles the stigma of OCD in a form that is easy for children to understand.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2022-05