Matching Items (2)

Filtering by

Clear all filters

137718-Thumbnail Image.png

Electronic Health Records: Federal Policy or Street Level Implementation.

Description

This thesis concerns the adoption of health information technology in the medical sector, specifically electronic health records (EHRs). EHRs have been seen as a great benefit to the healthcare system and will improve the quality of patient care. The federal

This thesis concerns the adoption of health information technology in the medical sector, specifically electronic health records (EHRs). EHRs have been seen as a great benefit to the healthcare system and will improve the quality of patient care. The federal government, has seen the benefit EHRs can offer, has been advocating the use and adoption of EHR for nearly a decade now. They have created policies that guide medical providers on how to implement EHRs. However, this thesis concerns the attitudes medical providers in Phoenix have towards government implementation. By interviewing these individuals and cross-referencing their answers with the literature this thesis wants to discover the pitfalls of federal government policy toward EHR implementation and EHR implementation in general. What this thesis found was that there are pitfalls that the federal government has failed to address including loss of provider productivity, lack of interoperability, and workflow improvement. However, the providers do say there is still a place for government to be involved in the implementation of EHR.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2013-05

The Need for Contextual Design when Creating Electronic Health Records

Description

Electronic Health Records (EHRs) began to be introduced in the 1960s. Government-run hospitals were the primary adopters of technology. The rate of adoption continually rose from there, doubling from 2007 to 2012 from 34.8% to about 71%. Most of the

Electronic Health Records (EHRs) began to be introduced in the 1960s. Government-run hospitals were the primary adopters of technology. The rate of adoption continually rose from there, doubling from 2007 to 2012 from 34.8% to about 71%. Most of the growth seen from 2007 to 2012 is a result of the passage of the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act as part of the American Reinvestment and Recovery (ARRA) Act. $19 billion dollars were made available as part of these two acts to increase the rate of Health Information Technology (HIT), of which EHRs are a large part. A national health information network is envisioned for the end stages of HITECH which will enable health information to be exchanged immediately from one health network to another. While the ability to exchange data quickly appears to be an achievable goal, it might come with the cost of loss of usability and functionality for providers who interact with the EHRs and often enter health data into an EHR. The loss of usability can be attributed to how the EHR was designed.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2020-05