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Prescription Information Extraction from Electronic Health Records using BiLSTM-CRF and Word Embeddings

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Medical records are increasingly being recorded in the form of electronic health records (EHRs), with a significant amount of patient data recorded as unstructured natural language text. Consequently, being able to extract and utilize clinical data present within these records

Medical records are increasingly being recorded in the form of electronic health records (EHRs), with a significant amount of patient data recorded as unstructured natural language text. Consequently, being able to extract and utilize clinical data present within these records is an important step in furthering clinical care. One important aspect within these records is the presence of prescription information. Existing techniques for extracting prescription information — which includes medication names, dosages, frequencies, reasons for taking, and mode of administration — from unstructured text have focused on the application of rule- and classifier-based methods. While state-of-the-art systems can be effective in extracting many types of information, they require significant effort to develop hand-crafted rules and conduct effective feature engineering. This paper presents the use of a bidirectional LSTM with CRF tagging model initialized with precomputed word embeddings for extracting prescription information from sentences without requiring significant feature engineering. The experimental results, run on the i2b2 2009 dataset, achieve an F1 macro measure of 0.8562, and scores above 0.9449 on four of the six categories, indicating significant potential for this model.

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2018-05

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Electronic Health Records: Federal Policy or Street Level Implementation.

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This thesis concerns the adoption of health information technology in the medical sector, specifically electronic health records (EHRs). EHRs have been seen as a great benefit to the healthcare system and will improve the quality of patient care. The federal

This thesis concerns the adoption of health information technology in the medical sector, specifically electronic health records (EHRs). EHRs have been seen as a great benefit to the healthcare system and will improve the quality of patient care. The federal government, has seen the benefit EHRs can offer, has been advocating the use and adoption of EHR for nearly a decade now. They have created policies that guide medical providers on how to implement EHRs. However, this thesis concerns the attitudes medical providers in Phoenix have towards government implementation. By interviewing these individuals and cross-referencing their answers with the literature this thesis wants to discover the pitfalls of federal government policy toward EHR implementation and EHR implementation in general. What this thesis found was that there are pitfalls that the federal government has failed to address including loss of provider productivity, lack of interoperability, and workflow improvement. However, the providers do say there is still a place for government to be involved in the implementation of EHR.

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2013-05

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Electronic Health Records: Suggestions for Future Use

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Electronic Health Records: Suggestions for Future Use explores how EHRs are currently being used in the clinical setting and in the research setting. This paper provides suggestions for how EHRs should be used in the future, so that patient centered

Electronic Health Records: Suggestions for Future Use explores how EHRs are currently being used in the clinical setting and in the research setting. This paper provides suggestions for how EHRs should be used in the future, so that patient centered health care is optimized while maintaining efficiency. Additionally, the thesis discusses why privacy is viewed as an innate human right in society as well as why it is specifically valued in the healthcare setting. The value of privacy significantly impacts how EHRs are currently used, and the more automated EHR systems become, the more likely it is that the privacy of patients is threatened. It was concluded that the healthcare industry can improve EHR use in future clinical and research settings, while upholding privacy laws.

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2019-05

The Need for Contextual Design when Creating Electronic Health Records

Description

Electronic Health Records (EHRs) began to be introduced in the 1960s. Government-run hospitals were the primary adopters of technology. The rate of adoption continually rose from there, doubling from 2007 to 2012 from 34.8% to about 71%. Most of the

Electronic Health Records (EHRs) began to be introduced in the 1960s. Government-run hospitals were the primary adopters of technology. The rate of adoption continually rose from there, doubling from 2007 to 2012 from 34.8% to about 71%. Most of the growth seen from 2007 to 2012 is a result of the passage of the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act as part of the American Reinvestment and Recovery (ARRA) Act. $19 billion dollars were made available as part of these two acts to increase the rate of Health Information Technology (HIT), of which EHRs are a large part. A national health information network is envisioned for the end stages of HITECH which will enable health information to be exchanged immediately from one health network to another. While the ability to exchange data quickly appears to be an achievable goal, it might come with the cost of loss of usability and functionality for providers who interact with the EHRs and often enter health data into an EHR. The loss of usability can be attributed to how the EHR was designed.

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2020-05