Matching Items (8)

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Advance Care Planning in Community-Dwelling Adults

Description

Advance care planning is a process that allows for patient autonomy at the end of life. Yet, less than 30% of Americans over the age of 65 have an advance

Advance care planning is a process that allows for patient autonomy at the end of life. Yet, less than 30% of Americans over the age of 65 have an advance care plan. Advance care planning has positive effects on patients, families and healthcare systems. However, both patients and healthcare providers report barriers to completing and discussing advance care planning. Many different interventions have been studied to increase advance care planning rates. Engaging patients and providers electronically before or during appointments in outpatient clinics and community settings has shown marked improvement in advance care plan discussions and documentation rates. To address this complex issue, two community-based seminars with electronic pre-engagement for adults has been proposed to improve advance care planning completion rates.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-04-24

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Being Proactive in Geriatric Advance Care Planning

Description

Disease burden is higher in the United States than in comparable countries. The Patient Self Determination Act of 1990 requires healthcare facilities to provide Advance Care Planning (ACP) information to

Disease burden is higher in the United States than in comparable countries. The Patient Self Determination Act of 1990 requires healthcare facilities to provide Advance Care Planning (ACP) information to all Medicare patients. The healthcare staffs’ (n=7) commitment to 3-days of ACP training increase ACP rates in the primary care setting. The Medicare Incentive Program is the platform for this initiative. This quantitative project used a valid and reliable pre and posttest design that consisted of 27 items on a Likert-scale. A 3.5-month chart audit (n=91) was conducted to assess the completion rate. Descriptive statistics was used to describe the demographic data.

The results of the two-tailed Wilcoxon signed rank test were significant based on an alpha value of 0.05, V = 0.00, z = -2.37, p = .018. There was a significant increase in the post-readiness to change average scores. A Mann Whitney test was used to analyze the statistically significant difference between the averages in two ACP types and electronic health record documentation (EHR). Staff did not always code (Mdn = 0.00) but they documented in the EHR (Mdn =1.00; 512.00, p = 0.003). ACP discussion was performed 63% of the time during Annual Wellness Visits (AWV), and there was a 49% increase in the EHR documentation. Trained staff are key stakeholders in guiding ACP conversations. They understand the barriers, impact, and consequences related to the lack of advance directives.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-04-30

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Advance Directive Advocacy: Empowering Homeless Clients to Express Their End-of-Life Wishes

Description

As Baby Boomers age, the number of older homeless patients facing end of life is increasing. Homeless individuals die of the same diseases as their domiciled counterparts, but they have

As Baby Boomers age, the number of older homeless patients facing end of life is increasing. Homeless individuals die of the same diseases as their domiciled counterparts, but they have distinct barriers to equitable end-of-life care, such as lack of regular medical care, a higher likelihood of comorbid serious mental illness and substance abuse, alienation from potential healthcare proxies, and specific fears related to dying. Completion of an advance directive (AD) would address many of these barriers, as well as national goals of reducing medical costs associated with end of life care. A review of the literature indicates that homeless individuals, once educated on the purpose and significance of ADs, complete them at a higher rate than non-homeless people. Further, racial and ethnic disparities in document completion are minimized with educational interventions about an AD’s purpose.

King’s Theory of Goal Attainment provides the theoretical basis for the application of such an intervention in the setting of a medical respite center and a day resource center that both serve the homeless. Thirty-seven clients of the two sites and 14 staff members were administered a pre-and post-test measuring attitudes and knowledge relating to ADs on a Likert scale, resulting in an increase in knowledge about one of the two documents that traditionally comprise an AD, while not significantly affecting attitudes. Implications for practice include an inexpensive intervention that does not require a medically trained individual to deliver, enabling a broad application to a variety of settings with the goal of empowering a traditionally disenfranchised population to make health decisions related to the most vulnerable of life passages.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05-07

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Advance Care Planning: How Do We Get to Completion?

Description

Advance care planning (ACP) is the act of deciding ones wishes at the end-of-life and making those wishes known. Healthcare providers rely on these wishes to provide end-of-life care. Despite

Advance care planning (ACP) is the act of deciding ones wishes at the end-of-life and making those wishes known. Healthcare providers rely on these wishes to provide end-of-life care. Despite the impact ACP has on quality of life at the end-of-life, most conversations remain undocumented. Even when ACP conversations take place, completion rates remain at an all-time low. This report explored the impact of appointment call reminders and patient portal messages on advance directive (AD) completion and documentation in the EHR. Following completion, a primary care practice experienced an increase in ACP conversation and ACP completion in the EHR. This report will discuss the methods utilized to improve ACP completion.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-04-28

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Advance Care Planning in a Primary Care Setting

Description

Purpose: Advance care planning (ACP) allows an individual to discuss and document their personal preferences at end-of-life. ACP has been shown to improve communication and reduce discomfort for patients and

Purpose: Advance care planning (ACP) allows an individual to discuss and document their personal preferences at end-of-life. ACP has been shown to improve communication and reduce discomfort for patients and their families. The literature supports utilizing formalized, multimodality training programs for healthcare providers in order to increase their confidence in initiating ACP discussions. These findings led to the initiation of an evidence-based practice project in a primary care setting with the purpose of increasing advance care planning discussions between providers and patients with the use of a standardized education tool.

Background and Significance: National regulations mandate that patients are provided information about advance directives in the healthcare setting, but completion rates are not monitored and continue to be low. ACP is now a billable service for healthcare providers, but it has not provided enough incentive to increase completion rates. Barriers for healthcare providers in the outpatient setting include lack of time, protocols, and lack of education on how to initiate and foster advance care planning discussions.

Methods: Healthcare providers in a primary care office attended a 15-minute structured educational session with and a toolkit was provided on the importance of ACP, how to initiate conversations with patients, and bill for the service. Participants completed a portion of the Knowledge, Attitudinal, and Experiential Survey on Advance Directives (KAESAD) survey assessing their confidence in ACP before and three months post intervention. Participant confidence (N = 6) in ACP was analyzed using the Wilcoxin test and descriptive statistics. The number of billed ACP services for the office was collected for four months post intervention and compared to the previous four months. Outcomes: A significant increase in provider confidence after participating in a multimodality education program was found in the results (Z = -2.21, p = .03). There was a 42.1% increase in the number of billed ACP discussions for the office in the four months post intervention.

Conclusion: The future desired state is that ACP discussions become standard practice in primary care leading to the completion of advance directives. This can be accomplished through formalized education sessions and resources for providers in order to increase their confidence in initiating ACP discussions with patients. The ultimate goal is to decrease unnecessary spending at end-of-life while improving patient and family satisfaction with the quality of care received at end-of-life.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-04-30

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Advance Care Planning: Providing Direction for Patients and Providers

Description

Many older Americans don’t have an advance directive (AD). ADs are legal documents that allow a person to express what types of medical treatment or cares that they want

Many older Americans don’t have an advance directive (AD). ADs are legal documents that allow a person to express what types of medical treatment or cares that they want at the end of their life if they were unable to speak for themselves. Patients without an AD could receive unwanted treatment. Providers can utilize advance care planning (ACP) to educate patients and support them in forming a medical power of attorney (MPOA) and AD. Evidence suggests that having ACP conversations can engage a patient to form an AD. The purpose of this project was to see if ACP discussions with older patients encouraged them to complete an AD and MPOA.

The project used a mixed method design. Participants were recruited from a primary care practice. Descriptive statistics described the sample and outcome variable. An independent t- test measured if there were significant changes in the participant responses for the ACP survey.

The average age (standard deviation) of the chart review sample was 72.22 (SD=9.47). The ages ranged from 60 to 100 years of age. Most of the sample in the chart audit were female with 105 (53%) participants and 95 (48%) were male. Most of the sample, 183 (92.5%) reported having a chronic health condition and 17 (7.5%) of the sample reported having no chronic condition. Overall, the results were inclined towards a significant difference in participants who did the ACP discussions and those who did not when comparing completed AD forms.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05-01

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Improving End-of-Life Care in the Primary Care Setting: Implementation of the Serious Illness Care Program

Description

Early and effective end-of-life care are associated with increased quality of life for those patients who may be nearing the end-of-life (EOL). However, evidence suggests that most non-palliative healthcare providers

Early and effective end-of-life care are associated with increased quality of life for those patients who may be nearing the end-of-life (EOL). However, evidence suggests that most non-palliative healthcare providers lack the skills and confidence to initiate EOL conversations. Consequently, about 70% of Americans would prefer to die at home with their families, yet only 25% die according to their wishes (State of California Department of Justice, n.d). In alignment with the Peaceful End of Life Theory, the purpose of this evidence-based project is to increase primary healthcare providers’ level of skills and confidence in end-of-life discussions.

This project utilized a pre and post study design. A total of 11 participants were recruited using convenience sampling from three primary care clinics in Phoenix, Arizona. Due to the small sample size and assumption of a non-normal distribution of the data, Wilcoxon Signed Ranks test and Pearson correlation coefficient were used for statistical analysis. There were clinical and statistical significant improvements in the EOL knowledge of the participants after the implementation of the two-and-a-half-hour Serious Illness Care Program (Z = -2.950, p = .003) with a large effect size (r = -0.62).

The project evaluation also demonstrated that most participants deemed that the intervention was effective. A brief and systematic education session, such as the SICP can be utilized to improve non-palliative healthcare providers’ skills in having more and effective end-of-life conversations.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05-02

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Exploring factors influencing Chinese American older adults' intentions to plan for end-of-life care

Description

This study aimed to understand the factors that influence Chinese American older adults’ advance care planning (ACP) on end-of-life care. The Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) and Health Belief Model

This study aimed to understand the factors that influence Chinese American older adults’ advance care planning (ACP) on end-of-life care. The Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) and Health Belief Model (HBM) were primarily applied to explain Chinese American older adults’ intentions toward two behaviors: 1) discussion of end-of-life care plans with family members and 2) completion of an advance directive (AD). Additionally, acculturation and family cohesion were considered to examine their impacts on the TPB and HBM. A cross-sectional survey was conducted through face-to-face interviews on a sample of 298 community-dwelling Chinese-American adults aged 55 and older living in the metropolitan Phoenix area of Arizona. Based upon random assignment, 161 participants answered questions regarding discussing end-of-life care plans with family members, while 137 participants answered questions related to the completion of an AD. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis was used to focus on the influence of TPB and HBM measures on behavioral intentions toward the two behaviors. Results indicated that both the TPB and HBM had predictive power to explain the target population’s intentions. However, the predictability of TPB and HBM measures varied across the two behaviors. Acculturation moderated the relationship between attitudes and intentions to complete an AD negatively. Family cohesion moderated the relationship between perceived benefits and intentions to discuss end-of-life care plans with family members negatively. These findings would help inform future interventions for improving the target population’s ACP awareness and engagement.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018