Matching Items (4)

126885-Thumbnail Image.png

Pressure Injury Prevention in the Inpatient Setting

Description

Background: Pressure injuries inflict a major, preventable burden onto hospital systems, healthcare providers, and patients. The purpose of this evidence based project was to evaluate the impact of a pressure

Background: Pressure injuries inflict a major, preventable burden onto hospital systems, healthcare providers, and patients. The purpose of this evidence based project was to evaluate the impact of a pressure injury prevention education program on nursing staff knowledge and pressure injury rates in an Arizona post-cardiac care unit.

Method: A single group pre-test post-test design was utilized to evaluate nursing staff knowledge before and after an education program on pressure injury prevention. Staff knowledge was evaluated using a modified version of the Pressure Ulcer Knowledge Assessment Tool 2.0. Participants completed pre- and post-education surveys. Rates of hospital acquired pressure injuries were obtained via chart review.

Results: Pre- and post-education scores were analyzed in participants who completed both surveys using a paired t-test. Post-education scores (M = 0.73, SD = 0.07) were significantly higher than pre-education scores (M = 0.59, SD = 0.09); t(7) = -5.39, p = .001. Pre- and post-education median scores of all participants were analyzed using two-tailed Mann-Whitney U test. Post-education scores (Mdn = 0.71) were significantly higher compared to pre-education scores (Mdn = 0.56); U = 102.5, z = -4.05, p = .001. Monthly incidence of pressure injuries on the unit increased following education.

Discussion: Increase in scores from pre- to post-education surveys indicate staff knowledge improved. The increased incidence of pressure injuries is thought to be secondary to staff’s increased ability to detect pressure injuries. Staff education is recommended, but more research is needed regarding the impact on pressure injury rates.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-04-16

Nurses' Views on Music Therapy: A Survey Study

Description

The purpose of this study is to learn about registered nurses' thoughts and experiences about the use of music and music therapy in the nursing field and whether or not

The purpose of this study is to learn about registered nurses' thoughts and experiences about the use of music and music therapy in the nursing field and whether or not nurses believe that there is supporting evidence practicing music therapy. Through an online survey administered to a local chapter of Sigma Theta Tau International Nursing Honors Society via SurveyMonkey, the study will 1) Assess the awareness and knowledge that registered nurses have regarding the use of music in the medical field. 2) Understand bedside nurses' willingness to use music as a complementary medicine in their own practices. 3) Ascertain where and how bedside nurses get knowledge about the use of music in the medical field. 4) Determine what constraints or barriers may influence bedside nurses' utilization of music in their practice. 5) The study will also examine the extent to which bedside nurses have had experience with observing music therapy or have utilized music therapists in their own practice.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013-12

154318-Thumbnail Image.png

A relational view of hospital and post-acute staff communication and adherence to evidence-based transitional care

Description

This descriptive research used social network analysis to explore the influence of relationships and communication among hospital nursing (RN, LPN, CNA) and discharge planning staff on adherence to evidence-based practices

This descriptive research used social network analysis to explore the influence of relationships and communication among hospital nursing (RN, LPN, CNA) and discharge planning staff on adherence to evidence-based practices (EBP) for reducing preventable hospital readmissions. Although previous studies have shown that nurses are a valued source of research information for each other, there have been few studies concerning the role that staff relationships and communication play in adherence to evidence-based practice. The investigator developed the Relational Model of Communication and Adherence to EBP from diffusion of innovation theory, social network theories, relational coordination theory, and quality improvement literature.

The study sample consisted of 10 adult-medical surgical units, five home care agencies and six long-term care facilities. A total of 273 hospital nursing and discharge planning staff and 69 post-acute staff participated. Hospital staff completed a survey about communication patterns for patient care and patient discharge and about communication quality on the unit. Hospital and post-acute care staff completed surveys about relationship quality and demographic characteristics. Evidence-based practice adherence rates for risk assessment, medication reconciliation, and discharge summary were measured as documented in the electronic medical record.

Social network analysis was used to analyze the communication patterns for patient care communication at the unit. These findings were correlated with (1) aggregate responses for communication quality, (2) aggregate responses for relationship quality, and (3) EBP adherence. Statistically significant relationships were found between communication patterns, and communication quality and relationship quality. There were

ii

two significant relationships between communication quality, and EBP adherence. Limitations in response rates and missing data prevented the analysis of all of the hypothesized relationships.

The findings from this study provide empirical support for the role of social networks and relationships among staff in adoption of, and adherence to, EBP. Social network theory and social network analysis, especially the concept of knowledge sharing, provide ways to understand and leverage the influence of peer relationships. Future studies are needed to better understand the contribution that relationships among staff (social networks) have in the adoption of and adherence to EBP among nursing staff. Further model development and multilevel studies are

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016

154151-Thumbnail Image.png

Critical care registered nurses' perceptions of nurse-to-nurse incivility and professional comportment

Description

This cross-sectional descriptive study was designed to examine critical care registered nurses’ perceptions of nurse-to-nurse incivility and professional comportment, and the extent to which education, nurses’ age, nursing degree, and

This cross-sectional descriptive study was designed to examine critical care registered nurses’ perceptions of nurse-to-nurse incivility and professional comportment, and the extent to which education, nurses’ age, nursing degree, and years of nursing experience is related to their perceptions on these topics. Professional comportment is comprised of nurses’ mutual respect, harmony in beliefs and actions, commitment, and collaboration. Yet, it was unknown whether a relationship existed between a civil or uncivil environment in the nursing profession and nurses’ professional comportment. Correlational analyses were conducted to explore the relationship between perceptions of nurse-nurse incivility and professional comportment, and the relationships between incivility and professional comportment education and perceptions of nurse-nurse incivility and professional comportment. Multiple linear regression analyses were conducted to identify predictors of perceptions of nurse-nurse incivility and professional comportment. Results indicated statistically significant relationships between perceptions of nurse-nurse incivility and professional comportment, and between professional comportment education and perceptions of professional comportment. Professional comportment education was identified as a statistically significant predictor of increased perceptions of professional comportment. Findings of the current study may assist in establishing more targeted and innovative educational interventions to prevent, or better address, nurse-nurse incivility. Future research should more clearly define professional comportment education, test educational interventions that promote professional comportment in nurses, and further validate the Nurse-Nurse Collaboration Scale as a measure of nurses' professional comportment.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015