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Transitional Care of Adults with Chronic Diseases Post-Discharge from Acute Settings

Description

Ineffective transitional care programs for ensuring the continuation of care from acute settings to the home settings post discharge can result in rehospitalization of elderly patients with chronic diseases. Usually,

Ineffective transitional care programs for ensuring the continuation of care from acute settings to the home settings post discharge can result in rehospitalization of elderly patients with chronic diseases. Usually, transitional care should be time-sensitive, patient-centered services intended to ensure continuity of care and an efficient transition between health care settings or home. A patient centered transitional care program was implemented at an outpatient primary care facility to reduce readmission rates. Institutional Review Board approval was obtained.

Twenty adult patients with chronic diseases discharged from an acute setting were identified. A follow up phone call and/or a home visit within 24-72 hours post discharge was employed. The Care Transitions Measure (CTM®) and Medication Discrepancy Tool (MDT®) were utilized to identify quality of care of transition and medication discrepancies. A chart audit collected data on the age of participant, diagnosis for initial hospitalization, CTM score, home visit, and ED visits or re-hospitalizations after 30 days of discharge. The outcome indicated that transitional care within primary care utilizing evidence-based practices is beneficial in reducing readmission rates. A logistic regression showed model significance, p = .002, suggesting that the CTM score was effective for both telephone support (TS) and home visit (HV).

A correlation analysis showed that as age of participants increased, the CTM score decreased, indicating that older adults required more support. A significance p <.001, of a proportional test indicated that readmission rates after the intervention was lower. It is evident that providing a timely and effective transitional care intervention in a primary care setting can reduce hospital readmissions, improve symptom management and quality of life of adult patients with chronic diseases.

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Date Created
  • 2020-05-05

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Controlling Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting Through Guideline Adherence

Description

Background:
Thirty to fifty percent of cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy will experience
chemotherapy induced nausea and or vomiting (CINV) despite the use of antiemetic prophylaxis Uncontrollable CINV can lead to

Background:
Thirty to fifty percent of cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy will experience
chemotherapy induced nausea and or vomiting (CINV) despite the use of antiemetic prophylaxis Uncontrollable CINV can lead to complications that add extra stress to patients, increase in healthcare costs, and utilization of resources. CINV can lead to chemotherapy dose reductions, treatment delays, chemotherapy changes, or discontinuation of treatment. Guidelines exist to better prevent and treat CINV. Evidence supports the use of guidelines to prevent CINV, however patients still suffer from CINV often due to a lack of guideline adherence.

Objectives:
The purpose of this project was to increase CINV guideline adherence by increasing knowledge of antiemetic guidelines utilizing an educational intervention for providers and nurses at an outpatient oncology office.

Methods:
A brief educational intervention on CINV and recommended NCCN guidelines was
conducted with providers and nurse (n=6) at an oncology practice in Southwestern United States. An evaluation to assess change in knowledge was performed using a pre and post test format. Statistical analysis was performed using descriptive statistics, McNemar tests and Wicoxan Signed Rank Test.

Findings:
There was a significant effect on knowledge of NCCN antiemetic guidelines (Z=-1.89, p=0.059, mean 2.5) post intervention. There also was a significant impact on likelihood to use guidelines in practice (Z=-1.89, p=0.059, mean 2.5). Increasing awareness and likelihood to CHEMOTHERAPY INDUCED NAUSEA AND VOMITING 3 follow recommended guidelines may improve CINV symptoms in patients undergoing chemotherapy and improve the treatment outcomes for these patients.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-04-29