Matching Items (50)

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The State of Latino Arizona

Description

The trajectory of Hispanic culture and society in the American Southwest began long before Arizona achieved territorial status, and its impact remains a defining element shaping the future of our

The trajectory of Hispanic culture and society in the American Southwest began long before Arizona achieved territorial status, and its impact remains a defining element shaping the future of our expansive binational region. Historical perspective provides a framework for an assessment of contemporary successes, challenges, and aspirations, as well as perceptions and projections regarding the potential of the decades to come. The report offers both objective indicators and nuanced perspective regarding the critical issues that require our collective attention, including education, healthcare, justice and equality, job creation, economic development, quality of life and quality of place, and opportunity for enterprise and social advancement.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2009

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A Multimedia Approach in Asthma Medication Education

Description

In the United States, more than 22 million people are estimated to be affected by the chronic illness, asthma (American Lung Association [ALA], 2014). Of those 22 million, approximately 7.1

In the United States, more than 22 million people are estimated to be affected by the chronic illness, asthma (American Lung Association [ALA], 2014). Of those 22 million, approximately 7.1 million are children (ALA, 2014). An important factor in trying to curb the frequency of asthma attacks is education. Particular elements of asthma education include symptom recognition, self-management skills, correct administration, and understanding how medications are used to control asthma. A review of the literature shows that multimedia education holds some promise in increasing asthma-knowledge retention. This creative project involved the creation of an asthma-education video with a concomitant asthma-education comic book. Of the two creations, the asthma-education video was used in a former Doctorate of Nursing Practice (DNP) student’s study to supplement a session at a clinic with an asthma educator. The tools included in the study, the Asthma Medication Use Questionnaire (Moya, 2014) and the Asthma Control TestTM (ACTTM; QualityMetric Incorporated, 2002), were completed by the participants prior to and after the implementation of the session that incorporated the video. The results suggested that the video had an effect on asthma control as measured by the ACTTM (QualityMetric Incorporated, 2002), but not on daily preventative asthma inhaler usage as measured by the Asthma Medication Use Questionnaire (Moya, 2014). The comic book has not been evaluated yet. Both multimedia education tools—the comic book and the video—were created as a requirement for the Barrett thesis.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

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Effects of a Lifestyle Intervention on Diabetes Risk in Latino Youth

Description

Background: The prevalence of childhood obesity has disproportionately affected Latino youth. This increase in obesity is seen with an increased incidence of Type 2 Diabetes. Objective/Hypothesis: The objective of this

Background: The prevalence of childhood obesity has disproportionately affected Latino youth. This increase in obesity is seen with an increased incidence of Type 2 Diabetes. Objective/Hypothesis: The objective of this study was to determine the effects of a community based lifestyle intervention, which encompassed nutrition education and physical activity, on diabetes risk in pre-diabetic Latino adolescents. Diabetes risk was assessed using pancreatic beta cell function as measured by proinsulin: insulin ratio. It was hypothesized that reductions in added sugar intake and reductions in saturated fat intake will be associated with improved beta cell function as measured by proinsulin: insulin ratio. Study Design/Participants: In this quasi-experimental study design, n=17 pre-diabetic Latino adolescents between the ages of 14-16 participated in a lifestyle intervention. Methods: Anthropometric measurements (weight, height, waist circumference, BMI) and body composition (body %) were determined for all participants at baseline and post intervention. Fasting proinsulin (PI), fasting insulin (I) and 2hr-OGTT were also determined. Dietary intake was measured using the Block Kids Food Screener for kids ages 2-17y (2007). The intervention consisted of nutrition education classes and physical activity sessions for 12 weeks. Results: We found significant decreases in body fat % following the intervention. There were no significant decreases in fasting insulin. Proinsulin significantly decreased. However we did no see a significant change in PI/I (p= 0.003). Dietary behaviors of added sugar (p=0.03) and saturated fat (p=0.04) showed significant decreases. No significant associations were found between changes in added sugar to improvements in beta cell function, r=0.072, p-value= 0.7. We also did not observe significant associations between reductions in saturated fat intake and improvements in beta cell function, r=0.152, p-value =0.6. Conclusions: We concluded that a 12-week lifestyle intervention resulted in significant changes in dietary behaviors. These changes were not however associated with improvements in beta cell function.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

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An Analysis of Arizona's Political Influence on K-12 STEM Education and Its Impact on Latino Undergraduates in STEM Majors

Description

The aim of this study is to analyze the impact Arizona legislation has had on STEM education access, specifically for Latino students. Using socio-ecological systems theory, this study explores the

The aim of this study is to analyze the impact Arizona legislation has had on STEM education access, specifically for Latino students. Using socio-ecological systems theory, this study explores the relation between the macro and exo-systemic context of education legislation and the micro-systemic context of being a STEM undergraduate at a state university. In order to understand how STEM education is affected, legislation was analyzed through the Arizona Legislative Database. Additionally, current STEM undergraduates were interviewed in order to discover the factors that made them successful in their majors. Data from the interviews would demonstrate the influence of the Arizona legislation macro and exo-systems on the microsystemic portion of Latinos and their access to STEM education. A total of 24 students were interviewed as part of this study. Their responses shed light on the complexities of STEM education access and the importance of mentorship for success in STEM. The overall conclusion is that more efforts need to be made before STEM education is readily available to many, but the most effective way to achieve this is through mentorship.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

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The Relationship between Biculturalism and Mental Health Outcomes among College-bound Latino Adolescents

Description

Cultural beliefs and behaviors can serve as both risk and protective processes for Latino adolescents, with some recent empirical work suggesting the important protective role of bicultural values (e.g., endorsing

Cultural beliefs and behaviors can serve as both risk and protective processes for Latino adolescents, with some recent empirical work suggesting the important protective role of bicultural values (e.g., endorsing high levels of both mainstream culture and culture of origin). We expanded on past research to explore whether bicultural values were associated with internalizing (depressive, anxiety, stress) symptoms and externalizing (alcohol use) symptoms among a sample of Latino adolescents preparing to begin college. We hypothesized biculturalism to protect against all negative outcomes. Our sample consisted of 209 college-bound Latino adolescents (65% female; 85.1% Mexican descent; 10.6% 1st generation, 62% 2nd generation) who were enrolled in university for the coming fall. All multivariate models included sex, ethnicity, parent education, and immigrant generation status as covariates. Correlations and multivariate analyses revealed that higher bicultural values were associated with lower depressive symptoms, lower anxiety symptoms, lower stress, and greater alcohol use. Gender was shown to moderate the relationship between biculturalism and alcohol use. Overall, findings suggested that greater bicultural values were associated with lower endorsement of internalizing symptoms for all participants, but higher endorsement of alcohol use over the last year for the highly bicultural females. Biculturalism may be particularly protective for Latino adolescents who are preparing to attend college given the need for them to transition into an environment with high acculturative demands. However, our results also highlight that these bicultural females may be at greater risk for alcohol use and related problems.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017-12

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Implicit Racial/Ethnic Bias and Latino Health: A Systematic Review

Description

In the United States, the Latino population is projected to reach approximately 28.6% of the total U.S. population by 2060. Despite their growing presence, Latinos encounter health disparities and worse

In the United States, the Latino population is projected to reach approximately 28.6% of the total U.S. population by 2060. Despite their growing presence, Latinos encounter health disparities and worse health outcomes in comparison to their non-Hispanic White (NHW) counterparts. Latinos/ Hispanics have a higher prevalence of diabetes, hypertension, obesity, and late stage cancer diagnosis. Various social determinants of health (SDoH) such as socioeconomic status, education, insurance enrollment, language proficiency, immigration status among other variables intersect to influence Latino health status. However, even when all those factors were held equal, disparities remained. The aforementioned list did not include race/ethnicity, though race/ethnicity is a critical SDoH that influences one's access to care and the quality of care they receive. As such, examining the role of race may be the key to reducing persistent health disparities in access to care, quality of care, and health outcomes.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017-12

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Exploring Perceptions of Colorectal Cancer Screening in Latino Adults: A Qualitative Approach

Description

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most prevalent form of cancer in both genders and second highest cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Despite the availability of preventative

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most prevalent form of cancer in both genders and second highest cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Despite the availability of preventative CRC screening, Latinos as a group are of particular concern for CRC as they tend to have a lower screening rate, contributing to the possibility of late-stage diagnosis or even death. However, little is known about the perceptions of CRC screening and factors which contribute to beliefs about CRC in Latinos. Most studies are quantitative and rarely include a qualitative approach focusing on cultural aspects and communication with physicians. The purpose of this study was to explore participants' perceived facilitators and barriers to CRC screening, as well as perspectives on physician recommendation and fatalism, using a qualitative approach. A convenience and snowball sampling were used to collect the data. Eight English-speaking Latino individuals (M age=56 years; 75% female) in the Phoenix, Arizona area were invited to 60-90 minute in-depth interviews on perceptions of the colorectal cancer screening process. Ten major themes emerged from the interviews: (1) lacking awareness and knowledge of CRC screening, (2) attitude toward CRC and screening, (3) availability of preventive care, (4) physician trust, (5) fear, (6) desire for increased information, (7) personal learning, (8) lifestyle factors, (9) cultural impact, and (10) willingness to change lifestyle. Results indicated varying levels of perceived knowledge of colorectal cancer, little perceived risk of diagnosis, desire for more information, and a high level of physician trust. Implications for nursing included increased need for CRC screening educational resources, as well as further investigation of the influence of fatalistic belief in CRC screening compliance for the Latino population.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015-12

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Effects of a 12-week Lifestyle Intervention on Self-efficacy, Social Support, and Physical Activity in Obese Latino Adolescents

Description

Background: The prevalence of childhood obesity has disproportionately affected Latino youth and can be seen with an increase incidence of Type 2 Diabetes. This increase in obesity can be attributed

Background: The prevalence of childhood obesity has disproportionately affected Latino youth and can be seen with an increase incidence of Type 2 Diabetes. This increase in obesity can be attributed to physical inactivity. Increases in social support and self-efficacy are independently related to increases in physical activity. A lifestyle intervention can lead to increases in social support, self-efficacy and physical activity. Objective/Hypothesis: The objective of this study was to determine whether a 12-week lifestyle intervention could increase social support, self-efficacy and physical activity in obese Latino adolescents that participated in the intervention. It was hypothesized that adolescents that participated in the intervention would increase self-efficacy, social support from family and friends, and physical activity compared to their control counterparts. Study Design/Participants: In a randomized control trial, there were 125 Latino (n= 60 experimental group; n= 65 control group; mean age = 15.17 +- 1.65 Males n = 60; n = 65 females) participants included in this study. Participants were also required to have a BMI percentile >= 95th percentile for age and gender or BMI >= 30 kg/m2. Methods: The intervention, which was developed using the Social Cognitive Theory had components focusing on social support and self-efficacy and also consisted of nutrition education classes and physical activity sessions for 12 weeks. The psychosocial constructs of self-efficacy and social support were measured using the Adolescent Self-Efficacy for Diet and Activity Behaviors and Adolescent Social Support for Diet and Exercise Survey, respectively. Physical activity was assessed by the 3-day Physical Activity Recall. Results: We found significant increases in social support in family (p = 0.042) and vigorous physical activity (p = 0.001). There was also a significant difference between control and treatment group for moderate to vigorous physical activity after the intervention (p = 0.027). There were no changes in social support from friends or self-efficacy. Conclusion: We concluded that a 12-week lifestyle intervention did lead to changes in social support and physical activity behaviors. These changes could have been influenced by the intervention as they were measured these constructs pre/post intervention.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

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Formulation of Logic Model & Evaluation Plan for CPLC Insurance Program: A Collaboration Between Chicanos Por La Causa and the C.A.R.E. Program at the T. Denny Sanford School of Social and Family Dynamics, Arizona State University

Description

There is a widespread inequality in health care access and insured rates suffered by the Latino, Spanish-speaking population in Arizona, resulting in poor health measures and economic burden. The passage

There is a widespread inequality in health care access and insured rates suffered by the Latino, Spanish-speaking population in Arizona, resulting in poor health measures and economic burden. The passage of the Affordable Care Act in 2010 provided mechanisms to alleviate this disparity, however, many Latino communities lack accessible information and means to gain access to health insurance enrollment. Chicanos Por La Causa (CPLC) is a community based organizing that provides many services to low-income communities across Arizona, one of which is the CPLC Insurance Program. In collaboration with the Community Action Research Experiences (CARE) at Arizona State University, the program was studied to help address the need of a LOGIC model and evaluation plan to determine its effectiveness. Interviews with three executives within CPLC were conducted in conjunction with a literature review to determine the inputs, strategies, outputs, and outcomes of the LOGIC model that drive CPLC Insurance's mission. Evaluation measures were then created to provide the necessary quantitative data that can best show to what degree the program is achieving its goals. Specifically, the results indicated the key outcomes that drive the LOGIC model, and an evaluation plan designed to provide indicators of these outcomes was produced. The implications of this study are that the suggested data collection can verify how effectively the program's actions are creating positive change, as well as show where further improvements may be necessary to maximize effectiveness.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

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Assessing the Health Insurance Needs of the Low-Income Hispanic/Latino Population in Phoenix, Arizona

Description

The growing Hispanic population in Phoenix, Arizona frequently lacks financial resources which may limit their access to health care. The goal of this study was to identify the ideal factors

The growing Hispanic population in Phoenix, Arizona frequently lacks financial resources which may limit their access to health care. The goal of this study was to identify the ideal factors in a health insurance plan for the Hispanic/Latino population in Phoenix, AZ. A survey was designed to gather information regarding demographics, health insurance, preferences, and affordability. The survey was completed by 260 participants. Several multivariate regressions were run using SAS Statistical Software. The final model generated explained 4.48% of the variation in the data set. It showed that an individual who identified as Hispanic/Latino was 8.2% less likely to have health insurance. In addition, an individual who identified as a US Citizen was 23% more likely to have health insurance. To improve access and enrollment among the Hispanic/Latino population, further investigation is needed to identify relevant communication techniques that increase enrollment among this high-risk community.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05