Matching Items (2)

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Survivorship Care Plan: A Pilot Implementation in Colon Cancer Survivors

Description

Cancer survivorship has been identified as separate stage in cancer treatment posing unique issues that arise from the diagnosis of cancer, as well as late effects associated with treatments. Evidence

Cancer survivorship has been identified as separate stage in cancer treatment posing unique issues that arise from the diagnosis of cancer, as well as late effects associated with treatments. Evidence shows that cancer survivors demonstrate suboptimal follow-up care, and report high levels of unmet needs related to their cancer experience. To improve care for the increasing number of cancer survivors in the United States, survivorship care plans (SCPs) have been proposed as way to strengthen care coordination and improve patient outcomes.

Research suggests that SCPs have favorable impact on patient satisfaction and quality of life, however little research to date investigates the utility of SCPs in improving patient outcomes, adherence to follow-up recommendations, or patients’ confidence in self-care management. To further understand the role of SCPs in survivorship care, a pilot implementation of SCPs in colon cancer patients was implemented to gather data on the identified gaps.

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Date Created
  • 2018-04-29

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Improving the Care Transition to Outpatient Aftercare Services Following Addiction Treatment

Description

The chronic nature of substance use disorder requires continuity of care after residential treatment. Only a small proportion of patients, however, adhere to aftercare follow-up plans and the relapse rates

The chronic nature of substance use disorder requires continuity of care after residential treatment. Only a small proportion of patients, however, adhere to aftercare follow-up plans and the relapse rates remain between 40- 80% within a year post-discharge. Synthesis of evidence showed that facilitated referral (FR) significantly increased follow- up adherence and resulted to positive outcomes. The study aimed to examine the effectiveness of FR in improving access, follow-up adherence and engagement to aftercare services, and relapse rate after a month post- discharge.

After the Institutional Review Board approval, 30 participants were recruited in two residential treatment facilities. Questionnaires, the Assessment of Warning Signs of Relapse and Health leads surveys were utilized to collect data. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, McNemar, and Wilcoxon signed rank tests. Results showed that FR significantly increased access to many community aftercare services (p<.05). A significant reduction in relapse risk post-intervention was also noted (Z= -3.180, p= .001). Additionally, most participants discharged with scheduled appointments followed-up and had continued engagement with aftercare services. Eight participants maintained sobriety and 18 were lost to follow-up a month post-discharge, while four relapsed in the facility.

Overall, FR increased access to needed aftercare services and significantly decreased the relapse percentage risk post-discharge. FR is a promising intervention that can be implemented for practice. Future research is recommended to further examine the correlation with follow-up adherence and continuous engagement to aftercare services, and relapse rate at 30 days after discharge.

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Date Created
  • 2018-04-29