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The "Entrepreneurial Mindset" in Creative and Performing Arts Higher Education in Australia

Description

Creative and performing arts schools are increasingly facing the challenge of developing curricula to address an employability agenda in higher education. Arts entrepreneurship education is thought to address this need because it supports the unique nature of the work circumstances

Creative and performing arts schools are increasingly facing the challenge of developing curricula to address an employability agenda in higher education. Arts entrepreneurship education is thought to address this need because it supports the unique nature of the work circumstances of creative and performing arts graduates. As an emerging area of research, arts entrepreneurship education faces the challenge of not only being relevant and important to creative and performing arts education but of being robust enough to contribute to a “paradigm shift” (Beckman, 2011, p. 29). With this in mind, this article attempts to clarify a recurring theme of arts entrepreneurship education, this being the development of an “entrepreneurial mindset.”

We argue that if an entrepreneurial mindset is to be considered an essential aspect of arts entrepreneurship education, educators need to have a good understanding of what it means and how it might be taught. We examine data from four interviews with arts educators who have responsibility for teaching arts entrepreneurship in creative and performing arts schools. Their experiences enable us to clarify the meaning of an “entrepreneurial mindset” in a creative and performing arts context in higher education and to make suggestions about teaching and learning.

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2014-01-20

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Pressure Injury Prevention in the Inpatient Setting

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Background: Pressure injuries inflict a major, preventable burden onto hospital systems, healthcare providers, and patients. The purpose of this evidence based project was to evaluate the impact of a pressure injury prevention education program on nursing staff knowledge and pressure

Background: Pressure injuries inflict a major, preventable burden onto hospital systems, healthcare providers, and patients. The purpose of this evidence based project was to evaluate the impact of a pressure injury prevention education program on nursing staff knowledge and pressure injury rates in an Arizona post-cardiac care unit.

Method: A single group pre-test post-test design was utilized to evaluate nursing staff knowledge before and after an education program on pressure injury prevention. Staff knowledge was evaluated using a modified version of the Pressure Ulcer Knowledge Assessment Tool 2.0. Participants completed pre- and post-education surveys. Rates of hospital acquired pressure injuries were obtained via chart review.

Results: Pre- and post-education scores were analyzed in participants who completed both surveys using a paired t-test. Post-education scores (M = 0.73, SD = 0.07) were significantly higher than pre-education scores (M = 0.59, SD = 0.09); t(7) = -5.39, p = .001. Pre- and post-education median scores of all participants were analyzed using two-tailed Mann-Whitney U test. Post-education scores (Mdn = 0.71) were significantly higher compared to pre-education scores (Mdn = 0.56); U = 102.5, z = -4.05, p = .001. Monthly incidence of pressure injuries on the unit increased following education.

Discussion: Increase in scores from pre- to post-education surveys indicate staff knowledge improved. The increased incidence of pressure injuries is thought to be secondary to staff’s increased ability to detect pressure injuries. Staff education is recommended, but more research is needed regarding the impact on pressure injury rates.

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2020-04-16

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Being Proactive in Geriatric Advance Care Planning

Description

Disease burden is higher in the United States than in comparable countries. The Patient Self Determination Act of 1990 requires healthcare facilities to provide Advance Care Planning (ACP) information to all Medicare patients. The healthcare staffs’ (n=7) commitment to 3-days

Disease burden is higher in the United States than in comparable countries. The Patient Self Determination Act of 1990 requires healthcare facilities to provide Advance Care Planning (ACP) information to all Medicare patients. The healthcare staffs’ (n=7) commitment to 3-days of ACP training increase ACP rates in the primary care setting. The Medicare Incentive Program is the platform for this initiative. This quantitative project used a valid and reliable pre and posttest design that consisted of 27 items on a Likert-scale. A 3.5-month chart audit (n=91) was conducted to assess the completion rate. Descriptive statistics was used to describe the demographic data.

The results of the two-tailed Wilcoxon signed rank test were significant based on an alpha value of 0.05, V = 0.00, z = -2.37, p = .018. There was a significant increase in the post-readiness to change average scores. A Mann Whitney test was used to analyze the statistically significant difference between the averages in two ACP types and electronic health record documentation (EHR). Staff did not always code (Mdn = 0.00) but they documented in the EHR (Mdn =1.00; 512.00, p = 0.003). ACP discussion was performed 63% of the time during Annual Wellness Visits (AWV), and there was a 49% increase in the EHR documentation. Trained staff are key stakeholders in guiding ACP conversations. They understand the barriers, impact, and consequences related to the lack of advance directives.

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2020-04-30

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Mentoring Nurse Practitioner Colleagues: Implementing an Online Program

Description

The mentor role can help support the experienced nurse practitioner (NP) enhance a sense of belonging and commitment to the organization; however, NPs identify barriers of time, dedication, and lack of knowledge about mentoring. Current mentoring programs in Arizona are

The mentor role can help support the experienced nurse practitioner (NP) enhance a sense of belonging and commitment to the organization; however, NPs identify barriers of time, dedication, and lack of knowledge about mentoring. Current mentoring programs in Arizona are sporadic and formal training for the mentor is even more limited. In this project, an online training intervention to develop mentorship skills was provided for experienced NPs who viewed three video sessions of 20-25 minutes each. The topics (Open Communication & Accessibility; Mutual Respect & Trust; Independence & Collaboration) focused on developing key mentoring competencies identified from the literature. Participants did not report a significant increase in their mentoring skills after the video sessions, but they identified useful individual outcomes. Participants identified the need to formalize the experience with objectives for both the mentee and mentor and recommended seeking out the novice NP to build a mentoring relationship.

The project outcomes led to several recommendations. To support ongoing mentor relationships, organizations may need to push training out to their experienced NPs on the role of the mentor. Mentors who do not self-identify for remediation or training may need organizations to provide the training and not make it optional. Community and professional organizations like the Arizona Board of Nursing, Arizona Nurses Association and others could create training modules utilizing multiple platforms to reach NPs in rural and urban parts of the state. Finally, further projects are necessary to identify the most effective modalities when delivering training.

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2020-04-30

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Adverse Childhood Experiences and Maternal Education

Description

Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are traumatic events experienced during childhood that have negative effects starting as a child and extending into adulthood. The presence of multiple ACEs increases negative mental, physical, and behavioral health outcomes. Children of parents who have

Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are traumatic events experienced during childhood that have negative effects starting as a child and extending into adulthood. The presence of multiple ACEs increases negative mental, physical, and behavioral health outcomes. Children of parents who have experienced ACEs are at a higher risk of experiencing ACEs themselves, creating an intergenerational cycle of trauma between parents and their children. Evidence suggests that parenting education can reduce the impact of ACEs and potentially eliminate poor health outcomes. The literature revealed that parenting education was found to increase parenting competency, which will in turn reduce the impact of ACEs on children.

The purpose of this evidence-based project is to evaluate parenting competency and parenting self-efficacy after implementing six parenting workshops. The workshop topics consist of: (a) stress management, (b) understanding trauma, (c) positive parenting, (d) positive discipline, (e) play, and (f) learning development and support. The workshops were delivered at a community residential facility for women seeking recovery from abuse, incarceration, chemical dependency and other life-controlling problems. Participants included 10 female residents.

Demographics, ACE scores, pre and post Parenting Sense of Competency Scale, and a post intervention satisfaction questionnaire and discussion were used to collect data from the participants. Mothers’ ACE scores ranged from 2-9. The parenting self-efficacy score increased in the subgroup that attended all six workshops. All of the mothers agreed that the workshops would help with parenting their children. The findings suggest that parenting education increases parenting knowledge and self-efficacy, and may reduce the impact of ACEs on children.

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2020-05-04

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Improving Adolescent Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Rates Through Provider Education

Description

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a prevalent sexually transmitted infection that affects many adolescents and adults worldwide. The consequences of contracting HPV have proven to be devastating, potentially leading to a variety of life-threatening genitourinary and oral cancers. As such, prevention

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a prevalent sexually transmitted infection that affects many adolescents and adults worldwide. The consequences of contracting HPV have proven to be devastating, potentially leading to a variety of life-threatening genitourinary and oral cancers. As such, prevention via vaccination is critical. HPV vaccination is recommended for all adolescents beginning at 11 years of age. Although the immunization has proven to be safe and effective, HPV vaccination rates are substantially below target goals worldwide.

A literature review of evidence from the last five years was conducted to examine barriers and facilitators to HPV vaccine uptake. The most commonly cited barriers to vaccination included lack of knowledge about the vaccine and inadequate provider recommendation. Current evidence regarding interventions to increase HPV vaccine uptake reveal that best practices are multi-factorial and should include a combination of provider education and recommendation training. These findings led to the proposal of an evidence-based intervention aimed to increase adolescent HPV vaccination rates.

A one-hour educational program was conducted at a local pediatric primary care facility. Five healthcare providers participated in the program, which consisted of a PowerPoint presentation outlining the benefits of HPV vaccination and use of an interactive application from the CDC. The app taught participants how to offer a strong recommendation for the vaccine through active participation. Pre and posttests were administered to determine the providers’ intent to vaccinate and vaccination rates were monitored. Analysis of the data collected revealed a statistically significant rise in vaccination rates. These results reveal that provider education can improve recommendation techniques and therefore increase vaccine coverage. Further research is needed to see if one-time education is sustainable.

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2020-04-28

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Trauma Among First Responders: Curriculum Enhancement to Promote Optimal Mental Health

Description

Suicide among first responders, including pre-hospital emergency providers, emergency department staff, and law enforcement, is significantly higher than among the general population. There are various forms of mental health interventions, however, knowledge held by first responders could be a predictor

Suicide among first responders, including pre-hospital emergency providers, emergency department staff, and law enforcement, is significantly higher than among the general population. There are various forms of mental health interventions, however, knowledge held by first responders could be a predictor of mental health outcomes. Implementing an educational curriculum enhancement for emergency medical technician (EMT) students may help increase self-efficacy and knowledge of mental health.

In a community college in the southwestern United States, an educational intervention was developed to enhance mental health knowledge for EMT students. The intervention was created to include four interactions with students in the classroom setting to implement recruitment, pre and post survey completion, and a 1-hour lecture. The surveys consisted of pre and post student assessment of mental health knowledge and self-efficacy. Results suggested that EMT students increased their knowledge of mental health and personal self-efficacy. This intervention is brief and effortlessly implemented into an existing curriculum to produce strong outcomes.

This project demonstrates that a brief educational intervention offers an effective means of knowledge improvement while being cost effective and easily implemented. The use of curriculum enhancement was a novel approach and filled an identified gap in literature and education. Additional research is needed to further explore the effects of mental health knowledge enhancement for first responders.

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2020-04-26

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Sustainability Achieved Through Education

Description

The purpose of this paper is to identify the absence of sustainability teachings within our private school systems, introduce a program for the school systems to incorporate into existing curriculum, and present the process that would be needed to be

The purpose of this paper is to identify the absence of sustainability teachings within our private school systems, introduce a program for the school systems to incorporate into existing curriculum, and present the process that would be needed to be followed for introduction of this program. There is a growing interest in the topic of sustainability and how it potentially will affect the next generations. Today some large companies and even some countries around the world are engaging in sustainability practices. Currently this is a very small piece of action regarding what needs to take place to hope to promote change around the world. Layering sustainable teachings and practices into children in their formidable years through graduation from high-school will bring about individuals that incorporate sustainable living into their everyday personal and professional lives. Repeating this practice generation after generation will ensure a sustainable planet.

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2018-04-24

Our Greener Home Energy Toolkit: DIY Home Energy Solutions for Johnson City, TN

Description

This study examines the creation of a sustainability toolkit that can be implemented in many communities, beginning with Johnson City, Tennessee. This project began in 2019 and will continue to grow indefinitely. For this project, a toolkit that will allow

This study examines the creation of a sustainability toolkit that can be implemented in many communities, beginning with Johnson City, Tennessee. This project began in 2019 and will continue to grow indefinitely. For this project, a toolkit that will allow the public to have access to the tools and information they need in order to make their homes more energy-efficient will be created. It will be stocked in the local library in Johnson City Tennessee for free use to the public, as long as they have a library card, they can check out the toolkits. The toolkits will be used by the public, then returned to the library so that they can be restocked and checked out again. This study looks at the market, business and organizational research and the infrastructure of the project. Methods of research included looking at how the need for a change came about, who will benefit, existing similar programs and how they will be used in conjunction with this project, current organizational structures attached to the project, current team infrastructure and what resources are needed to fill the voids. Findings include what financial resources will be required and how they will be acquired, as well as resources that are currently available for this project and what is still needed in order for this project to be successful. As a result of this project, at least two libraries in the Johnson City area will be stocked with several energy toolkits for free and a partnership for future project expansion will have been established. This study looks at the process and what was learned during the implementation of the project.

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2020-05-18

Externalities: Revealing Hidden Natural Costs Through Labeling Legislation

Description

The planet is going through a mass extinction event brought on by human influence: biodiversity elimination, habitat destruction, climate change, and many other cascading effects. The toll on nature is already unconscionable, yet this is already effecting human populations as

The planet is going through a mass extinction event brought on by human influence: biodiversity elimination, habitat destruction, climate change, and many other cascading effects. The toll on nature is already unconscionable, yet this is already effecting human populations as well, and will only exponentially increase in the coming years. It won’t just be our children experiencing this crisis, it is us, now. It is already happening. Arguably a primary reason for these environmental issues falls to environmental externalities in our economic systems.

The only way to fundamentally address this is through a systemic introduction of labeling or reporting the environmental costs of products and services. Externalities are the hidden costs, or the costs not calculated in the production or use of a good or service. Through a lack of transparency, intentional obfuscation, and willful or pure ignorance, we as a species profoundly lack knowledge on how the products and services we consume affect the world around us. In fact, of 1000 global primary production sectors, none generate the profit needed to cover their cost in natural capital (TruCost, 2013).

The only way we can even have a chance to mitigate our impact is to be provided that data before we spend our money. As such, products and services must report their impacts on the environment through a standardized metric or grade on a label or report that is easy to understand and will capture information on biodiversity loss, climate change, pollution and waste. The only way for this to effectively take hold and maintain transparency is through governmental legislation and the associated infrastructure to provide a method for businesses to make such a calculation.

This paper describes the effort to design such policy, provide it to legislators and pass it. Most ideally, this would be integrated into a larger systemic bill designed to economically shape the country in a sustainable way. As such, this initiative is being proposed as an amendment to be added to House Resolution 109, the “Green New Deal.” Assimilating this as a specific initiative within the GND, which is currently more or less a framework of mission statements, provides a more solid groundwork for a successful legislative effort. The underlying concept is to enable the consumer with needed and usable information. There is no true guarantee of a “happy ending,” but at its core, it will help to hold businesses accountable and ultimately empower the common consumer to make informed choices, from whence the fate of our planet can at least be decided honestly.

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2020-05-15