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The Steps to My Stethoscope: Evidence Based Resources for BSN Students During and After their Degree

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Evidence has shown that new graduate nurses have a lot to learn when they begin working (Moore, Sublett, Leahy, & Bradley, 2017). Some of the common themes related to what new graduates are lacking when they move into their new

Evidence has shown that new graduate nurses have a lot to learn when they begin working (Moore, Sublett, Leahy, & Bradley, 2017). Some of the common themes related to what new graduates are lacking when they move into their new roles include communication skills, problem solving, and critical thinking (Missen, McKenna, Beauchamp, & Larkins, 2016). However, there is also a large gap involving information that new graduates need in order to make the transition into nursing practice. Nursing managers have stated that students are prepared for the hospital setting instead of how to get into the hospital setting (Missen et al., 2016). After two years of extensive education, I have found that other students and I have unanswered questions and concerns involving what to do after our nursing education ends. Little to no time was spent in formal coursework discussing topics like resumes, test anxiety, or what to wear for interviews. To address this need, I constructed a blog to not only reflect on my own experiences and get my own questions answered, but to also answer the questions of other nursing students, both present and future, and consolidate that information into one place. This blog goes into more depth and logistical detail using the Keele Curriculum Model developed by Humphreys, Wood, Johnson, Walsh, Witton, Green, and Corkhill (2013) as a conceptual framework. Even though scholarly blogging is a new form of communication, this is a useful way to exchange and discuss different ideas and facilitate collaboration (Puschmann & Mahrt, 2014). Blogs permit students to have access to a lot of information in one place and reduces the need to search through libraries and other resrouces. Blogs also allow for communication between professors and students who may not be geographically connected. Because blogs allow for editing after they are written, I will be able to update information in this scholarly blog as new research comes out, making the blog current and applicable for future nursing students.

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2018-05

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Determining Medical-Surgical Nurses' Perceptions of Alcohol-Abusing Patients

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Purpose: The purpose of this study is to examine perceptions of medical-surgical nurses of alcohol-abusing patients admitted to an acute care facility Background: Studies report that many nurses have negative feelings about substance-abusing patients (Neville & Roan, 2014). It has

Purpose: The purpose of this study is to examine perceptions of medical-surgical nurses of alcohol-abusing patients admitted to an acute care facility Background: Studies report that many nurses have negative feelings about substance-abusing patients (Neville & Roan, 2014). It has been found nurses report a lack of knowledge about substance abuse disorders, as well as a view that substance abusing patients are more emotionally challenging and dangerous, often leading to decreased motivation and lower levels of job satisfaction (van Boekel, Brouwers, van Weeghel & Garrestsen, 2013). However, studies have found that additional education can positively impact nurses' perceptions (Arthur, 2001). Methods/Approach: This study is a descriptive design using a 17-question 2-part survey. The first part of the survey includes seven demographic questions pertaining to the participants' characteristics and experiences. The second part of the survey is adapted from the Short Alcohol and Alcohol Problems Perception Questionnaire (SAAPPQ), a valid and reliable instrument used to assess healthcare providers' attitudes toward working with alcohol-abusing patients. Results: Eighty four medical-surgical nurses participated in the study. Over half reported having four hours or less of continuing education on alcohol abuse disorder. Regression analyses identified positive relationships between factors, particularly continuing education, on perceptions of alcohol-abusing patients. Conclusions/Implications: Results of this study can be used to determine what factors contribute to nurses' perceptions of alcohol-abusing patients in the medical-surgical unit, therefore aiding in identifying and developing effective policies, protocols, and interventions aimed at improving quality of patient care in this specific patient population.

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2016-05

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A Multimedia Approach in Asthma Medication Education

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In the United States, more than 22 million people are estimated to be affected by the chronic illness, asthma (American Lung Association [ALA], 2014). Of those 22 million, approximately 7.1 million are children (ALA, 2014). An important factor in trying

In the United States, more than 22 million people are estimated to be affected by the chronic illness, asthma (American Lung Association [ALA], 2014). Of those 22 million, approximately 7.1 million are children (ALA, 2014). An important factor in trying to curb the frequency of asthma attacks is education. Particular elements of asthma education include symptom recognition, self-management skills, correct administration, and understanding how medications are used to control asthma. A review of the literature shows that multimedia education holds some promise in increasing asthma-knowledge retention. This creative project involved the creation of an asthma-education video with a concomitant asthma-education comic book. Of the two creations, the asthma-education video was used in a former Doctorate of Nursing Practice (DNP) student’s study to supplement a session at a clinic with an asthma educator. The tools included in the study, the Asthma Medication Use Questionnaire (Moya, 2014) and the Asthma Control TestTM (ACTTM; QualityMetric Incorporated, 2002), were completed by the participants prior to and after the implementation of the session that incorporated the video. The results suggested that the video had an effect on asthma control as measured by the ACTTM (QualityMetric Incorporated, 2002), but not on daily preventative asthma inhaler usage as measured by the Asthma Medication Use Questionnaire (Moya, 2014). The comic book has not been evaluated yet. Both multimedia education tools—the comic book and the video—were created as a requirement for the Barrett thesis.

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2015-05

It Takes a Village: An Inquiry into the Importance of Community in Educational Success

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This research looks at a group of students from Tumaini Children's Home in Nyeri, Kenya. The purpose of this paper is to explore why this particular group of students is so academically successful. Quantitative research was taken from the average

This research looks at a group of students from Tumaini Children's Home in Nyeri, Kenya. The purpose of this paper is to explore why this particular group of students is so academically successful. Quantitative research was taken from the average 2013 test scores of Tumaini students who took the Kenyan Certificate of Primary Education (KCPE) exam in comparison to the scores of students who are not residing in the orphanage. Qualitative research involves interviews from those students who live in Tumaini and interviews from adults who are closely connected to the orphanage. The purpose is to understand why the students are performing so well academically and what support they have created for themselves that allows them to do so.

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2014-12

Seizure Discharge Education for Pediatric Patients: An Online Platform

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There is a shortage of online resources for children who have epilepsy. Most of the current online resources are designed for populations with a higher health literacy. This creative project addresses this shortage by offering education for children with epilepsy

There is a shortage of online resources for children who have epilepsy. Most of the current online resources are designed for populations with a higher health literacy. This creative project addresses this shortage by offering education for children with epilepsy that they are able to access and utilize online to understand their disease in greater depth. Comprehending discharge information after hospitalization can be difficult for children and families, which is why providing an accessible resource that also can be utilized at home increases understanding about the disorder and ability to manage the disorder. Basic information on epilepsy, safety tips for daily living, medication explanation, first aid information, and interactive resources are included on the website and are all geared toward children. A website developer, Sylvestri Customization™, assisted with creating the website utilizing template, search engine optimization and strategies for website sustainability. The website was created after completing a thorough review of current research literature and reviewing multiple, similar hospital educational websites while also consulting with healthcare professionals to ensure the information was evidence-based. While the website provides supplemental education via an online platform for children with epilepsy to explore, there is a need for future research to test the acceptability and efficacy of the website.

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2016-12

Impact of an Educational Video Intervention on the Emotional Well-Being of Patients and Caregivers Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

Description

Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a unique but intense procedure used to save the lives of patients with hematopoietic malignancies. However, patients and caregivers undergoing HSCT can experience prolonged psychological distress due to an intense and distinctive transplant process.

Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a unique but intense procedure used to save the lives of patients with hematopoietic malignancies. However, patients and caregivers undergoing HSCT can experience prolonged psychological distress due to an intense and distinctive transplant process. Types of psychological distress include anxiety, depression, social isolation, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Although this a significant healthcare problem, limited research has been conducted within the HSCT patient and caregiver population to investigate ways to improve their mental health. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of an educational video intervention about post-transplant recovery in decreasing emotional distress and promoting emotional well-being in HSCT patients and caregivers. This pilot study utilized a quantitative single-group pretest-posttest design to examine the effect of educational videos on participant's emotional well-being. Four educational videos were developed using information gathered from several reliable bone marrow transplant and cancer websites. A convenience sampling method was used to recruit HSCT patient and caregiver participants. Eleven Caucasian, English-speaking individuals (6 patients, 5 caregivers; 54.5% female; M age= 43.7 years) across the United States were enrolled in the 60-90 minute online intervention. Participant responses were measured using pretest and posttest questionnaires. Results from the study found that the educational videos were effective in decreasing levels of depression and anxiety. Implications for nursing practice include the need to educate HSCT patients and caregivers about transplant recovery to decrease emotional distress. This study demonstrates the impact post-transplant education has on decreasing depression and anxiety in HSCT patients and caregivers.

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2016-12

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Redesigning Evidence-Based Initiatives for Nurses

Description

Healthcare organization leaders greatly rely on evidence-based practice (EBP) to guide the delivery of care and support clinical decisions on patient care. EBP is a process of assessing and implementing best evidence, patient values, and clinical expertise to make clinical

Healthcare organization leaders greatly rely on evidence-based practice (EBP) to guide the delivery of care and support clinical decisions on patient care. EBP is a process of assessing and implementing best evidence, patient values, and clinical expertise to make clinical decisions on patient care. Engagement in EBP is an opportunity to overcome the barriers that lead to poor patient and system outcomes. However, EBP implementation can be difficult due to barriers such as lack of time, lack of EBP knowledge, lack of leadership support, and difficulty accessing resources. Several studies support educational programs for nurses to strengthen EBP beliefs and implementation. The purpose of this project was to increase participation in EBP for nurses practicing at Mayo Clinic Arizona. The project involved planning for redesign of existing EBP courses along with new types of support and educational sessions. DNP students participated in the initiative through searching for and synthesizing evidence, collecting and analyzing survey data, and presenting recommendations for program development and outcome measurement to nursing leaders in the organization.
Keywords: evidence-based practice, hospital, nurses, engagement, continuing education

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2021-04-25

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Ending HIV: Improving Providers Perceptions and Implementation Practices of Preexposure Prophylaxis in Females at Risk of HIV Infection

Description

Introduction: Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is a critical development in HIV prevention, yet females at risk of contracting HIV have lower rates of PrEP use compared to their male counterparts. Insufficient knowledge on PrEP indications for women has been a key

Introduction: Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is a critical development in HIV prevention, yet females at risk of contracting HIV have lower rates of PrEP use compared to their male counterparts. Insufficient knowledge on PrEP indications for women has been a key barrier in health care providers (HCP) utilization of PrEP in this population. Prior research has revealed educational interventions improved providers’ use of PrEP in at risk populations.
Methods: A 1-hour, educational session was developed for eleven HCPs at a university-based clinic. The educational session was guided by the Cognitive Learning Theory and included information on clinical practice guidelines for PrEP implementation in women. The effects of the intervention were analyzed using a pre/post-survey design, with post surveys delivered at two and eight weeks. The 16-item survey evaluated outcomes including provider discussion and prescription rates of PrEP with female patients and perceived knowledge and perceptions of PrEP in women, utilizing a Likert scale. All procedures were given exempt status by the university IRB.
Results: Paired sample t tests were used to analyze provider reported conversations and prescription rates, while matched ordinal data were analyzed utilizing Wilcoxon signed rank tests and descriptive statistics. At two-weeks post intervention there was a significant increase in provider’s reported likelihood of prescribing to at risk cis gender females in the next six months (Mdn= 2 [pre-survey], Mdn = 3 [post-survey], α= 0.05, V = 0.00, z = -2.53, p = .011). At eight weeks postintervention, there was a statistically significant decrease in provider’s beliefs that HIV risk assessment was an essential component of a primary care visit for female patients (Mdn = 3.00 [pre], Mdn = 2.00 [eight-week], α= 0.05, V = 10.00, z = -2, p = .046). The results of the data analysis have been shared with the leadership team of the health clinic and used to inform future practice on provider educational sessions on PrEP.
Conclusion: Women at risk of contracting HIV are a key demographic missed for the utilization of PrEP. Limited statistically significant findings from the intervention have prompted further research to focus on interventions that promote long-term behavior change and improve providers implementation practices of the preventive measure in at-risk female identifying patients.

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2021-04-25

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Educating Healthcare Professionals on Evidence-Based Domestic Violence Interventions

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Purpose: The purpose of this quality improvement project was to train healthcare professionals (HCP) on evidence-based interventions for domestic violence (DV).
Background: DV occurs at high rates and negatively impacts physical and mental health. Intermittently screening patients for DV is

Purpose: The purpose of this quality improvement project was to train healthcare professionals (HCP) on evidence-based interventions for domestic violence (DV).
Background: DV occurs at high rates and negatively impacts physical and mental health. Intermittently screening patients for DV is healthcare’s current response and this is inadequate. Evidence shows the most effective way to assist DV victims is through active psychoeducation. Active psychoeducation involves a conversation between the HCP and patient about relationship safety, the sharing of local resources, and a referral to a local DV agency if warranted.
Methods: A virtual educational intervention was recorded and made available to members of a professional nursing organization in the Western United States. The educational intervention provided instruction on the Confidentiality, Universal education, Empowerment, Support (CUES) method, an active psychoeducation technique. The post-education survey was a modified version of Project Catalyst’s Post-Training Survey for Community Health Centers with twenty-one questions pertaining to understanding of the training and intention to incorporate CUES into clinical practice.
Results: Eleven participants completed the educational intervention and post-education survey. Descriptive statistics demonstrated that participants strongly agreed (73%) and agreed (27%) that the training improved their ability to provide active psychoeducation on DV. All participants reported an intention to incorporate CUES into their clinical practice.
Conclusion: Training HCP to provide active psychoeducation on DV to their patients increases professionals’ ability to incorporate this evidence-based method into clinical practice.

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2021-04-09

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Advancing the Implementation of Medication-Assisted Treatment in Residential Treatment

Description

Objective: To assess the attitudes and knowledge of behavioral health technicians (BHTs)
towards opioid overdose management and to assess the effect of online training on opioid
overdose response on BHTs’ attitudes and knowledge, and the confidence to identify and
respond

Objective: To assess the attitudes and knowledge of behavioral health technicians (BHTs)
towards opioid overdose management and to assess the effect of online training on opioid
overdose response on BHTs’ attitudes and knowledge, and the confidence to identify and
respond to opioid overdose situations.
Design/Methods: Pre-intervention Opioid Overdose Knowledge Scale (OOKS) and Opioid
Overdose Attitude Scale (OOAS) surveys were administered electronically to five BHTs in
2020. Data obtained were de-identified. Comparisons between responses to pre-and post-surveys
questions were carried out using the standardized Wilcoxon signed-rank statistical test(z). This
study was conducted in a residential treatment center (RTC) with the institutional review board's
approval from Arizona State University. BHTs aged 18 years and above, working at this RTC
were included in the study.
Interventions: An online training was provided on opioid overdose response (OOR) and
naloxone administration and on when to refer patients with opioid use disorder (OUD) for
medication-assisted treatment.
Results: Compared to the pre-intervention surveys, the BHTs showed significant improvements
in attitudes on the overall score on the OOAS (mean= 26.4 ± 13.1; 95% CI = 10.1 - 42.7; z =
2.02; p = 0.043) and significant improvement in knowledge on the OOKS (mean= 10.6 ± 6.5;
95% CI = 2.5 – 18.7; z =2.02, p = 0.043).
Conclusions and Relevance: Training BHTs working in an RTC on opioid overdose response is
effective in increasing attitudes and knowledge related to opioid overdose management. opioid
overdose reversal in RTCs.

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2021-04-12