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The Importance of Graphic Design Skills in Marketing

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This thesis examines the importance of graphic design in the marketing profession, with an emphasis on the necessity of specific graphic design skills in the acquisition of an entry-level marketing

This thesis examines the importance of graphic design in the marketing profession, with an emphasis on the necessity of specific graphic design skills in the acquisition of an entry-level marketing position or internship. The research begins with a thorough examination of various job posts requiring a marketing degree and a detailed analysis of how certain changes in the marketing landscape are causing graphic design skills such as the Adobe Creative Suite to be important in entry-level marketing. The thesis then discusses and critiques what actions are being taken by universities across the United States to address the issue of marketing undergraduates not feeling prepared to enter the workforce. Using these actions as a basis, the thesis then concludes with recommendations for universities in general, recommendations specific to Arizona State University, and recommendations for students given these new insights regarding graphic design. Some of these university recommendations, which also apply to ASU, include creating an interdiscplinary degree program, improving or changing current major or minor programs to integrate the two disciplines, implementing new courses, and encouraging students to use a variety of low-cost, online resources. The student recommendations include searching for degree programs with design-related major and minor offerings, pursuing a minor in a design-related area, utilizing online learning resources and approaching design students and faculty for individualized instruction.

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  • 2014-05

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Education in the Hispanic Community

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This project largely focuses on the Latino population and how Hispanic parents should become more involved with their student's education in order to have them prosper in today's society.

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Date Created
  • 2014-05

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United Nations Theory and Practice: Materials for the Propagation of Model United Nations Organizations

Description

This project covered different components to strengthen Model United Nations organizations, especially programs in Arizona itself. The lack of strong programs in Arizona can be attributed in many ways to

This project covered different components to strengthen Model United Nations organizations, especially programs in Arizona itself. The lack of strong programs in Arizona can be attributed in many ways to a lack of resources, and this project's work aims to bolster programs by providing some resources. The written component contains a write-up of a 2013 High School Model United Nations Conference at Arizona State University; a write-up of a 2014 Middle School Model United Nations Conference at Arizona State University; a guide on how to run such a conference, focused at the high school level; a university-level curriculum that integrates a Model United Nations organization into a classroom setting, including assignments and; a grade school lesson plan with seven lessons that focuses on teaches students about international relations and global affairs while preparing them for a Model United Nations conference.

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  • 2014-05

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Music in the Classroom: A Look at Melodies and Phonics Retention

Description

The study compares the pretest and posttest results of three groups of second-grade students studying a phonics rule to determine the effect of using music as an instructional aid. For

The study compares the pretest and posttest results of three groups of second-grade students studying a phonics rule to determine the effect of using music as an instructional aid. For two groups in the study, the teachers used melodies to instruct students, while the third group was held to direct instruction with no music to use for assistance. The study groups were three second-grade classes at Ishikawa Elementary School, where I was serving as a student teacher. Parental consent was received for each of the students participating in the study. The duration of the study was one week. The first test group was given a familiar melody with new lyrics to reflect the content of the phonics rule "I before E except after C." The second test group was given a melody composed specifically to accompany the phonics rule and to reflect the appropriate phonics content. On the first day of the study, students were given a pretest; these scores were recorded and then compared to the posttest scores from the end of the week. The data that were collected compared groups as a whole through composite scores from pretest to posttest to determine most effective methodology. The groups that were instructed using music demonstrated greater growth and had higher posttest scores.

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Date Created
  • 2014-12

It Takes a Village: An Inquiry into the Importance of Community in Educational Success

Description

This research looks at a group of students from Tumaini Children's Home in Nyeri, Kenya. The purpose of this paper is to explore why this particular group of students is

This research looks at a group of students from Tumaini Children's Home in Nyeri, Kenya. The purpose of this paper is to explore why this particular group of students is so academically successful. Quantitative research was taken from the average 2013 test scores of Tumaini students who took the Kenyan Certificate of Primary Education (KCPE) exam in comparison to the scores of students who are not residing in the orphanage. Qualitative research involves interviews from those students who live in Tumaini and interviews from adults who are closely connected to the orphanage. The purpose is to understand why the students are performing so well academically and what support they have created for themselves that allows them to do so.

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  • 2014-12

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Supply Chain Management Outreach Program: Increasing Awareness of SCM in High Schools Around the World

Description

This paper outlines the process of designing, creating, and implementing a supply chain management outreach program to benefit high schools students in areas surrounding Intel campuses. The program—which spreads awareness

This paper outlines the process of designing, creating, and implementing a supply chain management outreach program to benefit high schools students in areas surrounding Intel campuses. The program—which spreads awareness of supply chain management and STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) and how they work together in businesses today—was created and tested by me, with the help of the following committee members: James Kellso – Director, Cheryl Dalsin – 2nd Reader, and Jack Berg – 3rd Reader. The end goal is for this program to become sustainable, and for it to spread as far and wide as possible. Supply chain management and STEM are becoming crucial to understand in businesses today and will only become more imperative in future years.

Keywords: supply chain management (SCM), Science Technology Engineering Math (STEM)

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  • 2014-05

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Ways of Thinking for Developing an Understanding of Covariational Reasoning in Undergraduate Calculus Students

Description

Previous research discusses students' difficulties in grasping an operational understanding of covariational reasoning. In this study, I interviewed four undergraduate students in calculus and pre-calculus classes to determine their ways

Previous research discusses students' difficulties in grasping an operational understanding of covariational reasoning. In this study, I interviewed four undergraduate students in calculus and pre-calculus classes to determine their ways of thinking when working on an animated covariation problem. With previous studies in mind and with the use of technology, I devised an interview method, which I structured using multiple phases of pre-planned support. With these interviews, I gathered information about two main aspects about students' thinking: how students think when attempting to reason covariationally and which of the identified ways of thinking are most propitious for the development of an understanding of covariational reasoning. I will discuss how, based on interview data, one of the five identified ways of thinking about covariational reasoning is highly propitious, while the other four are somewhat less propitious.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

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Perspectives of Online Education at Arizona State University

Description

By distributing a survey to students and professors, this study investigates the perceptions of online education at Arizona State University and uses statistical analysis to establish connections between the characteristics

By distributing a survey to students and professors, this study investigates the perceptions of online education at Arizona State University and uses statistical analysis to establish connections between the characteristics of individuals and the opinions that they have about online education. In relation to online education, this study investigates the topics of academic dishonesty, learning effectiveness, increasing diversity in the university, the effect on reputation, the academic rigor of courses, societal obligations, and overall opinions of online education as a whole. The aggregate results of these surveys were then compared to the categorized results of students and professors, students with varied levels of GPA, students with varied exposure to online classes, and students with varied majors of study. These comparisons were used to establish statistical correlations between an individual's occupation in a specific category and the types of opinions they have regarding online education.

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Date Created
  • 2014-05

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Unequally Educated: Arizona's Attempt to Undermine Educational Opportunities For Hispanics And Why It Matters

Description

The demographics of Arizona are changing as Hispanics children are passing through their youth and into adulthood. Yet, even with this changing population Arizona has demonstrated an unwillingness to provide

The demographics of Arizona are changing as Hispanics children are passing through their youth and into adulthood. Yet, even with this changing population Arizona has demonstrated an unwillingness to provide adequate educational opportunities for Hispanic school children. The state has perpetuated fear throughout the Hispanic community in an attempt to marginalize and stigmatize the race. Such attempts have extended to youth in schools creating an environment of fear. This fear limits the academic potential of young Hispanics who are wary of government officials and institutions. Arizona has also failed to provide appropriate funding for programs used predominantly by Hispanic students leaving them unprepared for a workplace that desperately needs them. Finally, Arizona has refused to allow course content with a record of increasing academic achievement and graduation rates amongst Hispanics to be taught in schools. Taken as a whole Arizona's efforts are creating a cadre of unskilled and unprepared laborers who will be desperately needed to take jobs in the Arizona economy in the coming years. This blatant disregard for the educational needs of a large segment of the population will have a devastating impact on Arizona's future.

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Date Created
  • 2013-12

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Building Bridges: Discovering Ways to Connect Barrett Students with Barrett Summer Scholars Alumni to Increase Academic Success

Description

Through interviews with student participants in Barrett Summer Scholars during 2012, I uncovered how education in Arizona is failing and succeeding in meeting the needs of its high-achieving, oftentimes academically

Through interviews with student participants in Barrett Summer Scholars during 2012, I uncovered how education in Arizona is failing and succeeding in meeting the needs of its high-achieving, oftentimes academically disillusioned students. Many high-achieving students feel underserved by their education and do not receive adequate challenges or one-on-one attention. Socioeconomic, ethnic, and racial limitations further contribute to the disenchantment of students and educational inequalities in the US and Arizona in particular. The Barrett Summer Scholars program itself intends to help engage these students, but it may be failing in its stated goals. Limited resources make it difficult for schools to pay as much attention to the high-achieving students as to the low-achieving, but Barrett might be able to help bridge this gap and provide students with one-on-one attention by way of student mentorship.

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Date Created
  • 2014-05