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Teaching Leadership: Forming Hirable Employees through Leadership Education

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Organizations are hiring prospective employees with more transformational leadership qualities because of the organizational benefits associated with those leadership skills (Men, 2014). While current research examines the effects of transformational leadership in the workplace and the effects of hiring standards

Organizations are hiring prospective employees with more transformational leadership qualities because of the organizational benefits associated with those leadership skills (Men, 2014). While current research examines the effects of transformational leadership in the workplace and the effects of hiring standards on organizational success, this research lacks an understanding of how to promote these hireable transformational leadership skills in education. In this study, we examine how students at the collegiate level are taught to enact leadership skills from two different methods and how they are perceived as hireable or not by human resource managers. To do this, we hired human resource professionals to code for hireability in the actions of the participants in a leadership scenario conducted at the end of the semester. By testing how students from each class are perceived as more or less hireable by human resource professionals, we contribute to the overall study of the benefits of transformational leadership in the workplace.

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2018-05

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Escape Rooms: Learning by Doing

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The experiences of 14 groups of 2-8 players in a local escape room were observed through the lens of small-group teamwork and goal-based communication. Their interactions were used to explore how escape rooms could be used as a tool to

The experiences of 14 groups of 2-8 players in a local escape room were observed through the lens of small-group teamwork and goal-based communication. Their interactions were used to explore how escape rooms could be used as a tool to improve the retention of knowledge using experiential learning and to develop substantial interpersonal relationships between teams of strangers. These observations were used to develop an ASU-themed escape room for educating prospective students about ASU's culture and campus with a focus on total inclusion and enthusiastic participation.

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Date Created
2018-05

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Implicit Theories: Influences on Impression Management, Motivation, Empowerment, and Guilt

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The following study applies research on Implicit Person Theory (IPT) to the context of organizational communication. IPT scholars argue that most individuals ascribe to one of two groups regarding perceptions of ability: entity or incremental theorists. Entity theorists believe abilities

The following study applies research on Implicit Person Theory (IPT) to the context of organizational communication. IPT scholars argue that most individuals ascribe to one of two groups regarding perceptions of ability: entity or incremental theorists. Entity theorists believe abilities are fixed, unchanging, and constant, whereas incremental theorists believe abilities are changeable, malleable, and subject to development. Incremental theories are a predictor of success, while entity theories can stifle development (e.g., Dweck, 2006). This study explores the relationship employees' mindsets have on the organization, including learner empowerment, impression management, organizational dissent, and guilt. The present study reasons that incremental (versus entity) theorists will exhibit higher perception of learner empowerment, lower expression of impression management behaviors, higher expression of organizational dissent, and a lower perception of organizational related guilt. No significant results were found on the directional relationships predicted; however, this study presents implications for future research in the area of IPT and organizational communication.

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2016-05

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Combat to Classroom: Communication Barriers Veteran-Students Face Returning to College

Description

As the United States' military presences in Afghanistan and Iraq are being minimized, an increasing number of veterans are transitioning from the military to pursue higher education opportunities. Due to the military's organizational characteristics, socialization procedures, and performance requirements, this

As the United States' military presences in Afghanistan and Iraq are being minimized, an increasing number of veterans are transitioning from the military to pursue higher education opportunities. Due to the military's organizational characteristics, socialization procedures, and performance requirements, this population of students likely faces unique barriers to success in traditional models of higher education. The increase of this unique population necessitates research to evaluate their educationally related social and relational needs so that institutions of higher education will be better able to assist in achieving their academic goals. The student-teacher relationship is a key predictor in students' academic success (Yoon, J. S., 2002). Using survey research, this project examines veteran students' perceptions of their relationships with instructors, characteristics of the organization, communication apprehension with professors and peers, and perceived self-esteem. With the assistance of the Pat Tillman Veterans Center at Arizona State University, approximately 3800 veteran students, in both undergraduate and graduate programs, were invited to participate in the research. The study identified significant relationships between a veteran-student's length of time since separating from military service, their feelings of success as a student, self-esteem, and apprehension of communication with professors. There was also a significant relationships on length of military service, self-esteem, and apprehension of communication with professors.

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Date Created
2015-05

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Perspectives of Online Education at Arizona State University

Description

By distributing a survey to students and professors, this study investigates the perceptions of online education at Arizona State University and uses statistical analysis to establish connections between the characteristics of individuals and the opinions that they have about online

By distributing a survey to students and professors, this study investigates the perceptions of online education at Arizona State University and uses statistical analysis to establish connections between the characteristics of individuals and the opinions that they have about online education. In relation to online education, this study investigates the topics of academic dishonesty, learning effectiveness, increasing diversity in the university, the effect on reputation, the academic rigor of courses, societal obligations, and overall opinions of online education as a whole. The aggregate results of these surveys were then compared to the categorized results of students and professors, students with varied levels of GPA, students with varied exposure to online classes, and students with varied majors of study. These comparisons were used to establish statistical correlations between an individual's occupation in a specific category and the types of opinions they have regarding online education.

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2014-05