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Arizona Nurses Association Member Involvement in Public Policy

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The purpose of the study was to determine the level and type of public policy involvement among registered nurses (RN) who are members of the Arizona Nurses Association (AzNA). Furthermore, the aim of the study was to identify the knowledge

The purpose of the study was to determine the level and type of public policy involvement among registered nurses (RN) who are members of the Arizona Nurses Association (AzNA). Furthermore, the aim of the study was to identify the knowledge base and motivation of nurses and their involvement in public policy as well as the barriers and benefits. A 20- item survey was sent to all of the members of AzNA. There were 39 responses used in the analysis. The highest reported public policy activities in which the nurses had participated were: voted (90%), contacted a public official (51%), and gave money to a campaign or for a public policy concern (46%). Lack of time was the most frequently reported barrier to involvement and improving the health of the public was the most frequently reported benefit to involvement. The number of public policy education/information sources and the highest level of education positively correlate to the nurses' total number of public policy activities (r = .627 p <0.05; r = .504, p <0.05). Based on the results of stepwise linear regression analysis, the participants' age, number of education/information sources, and efficacy expectation predict 68.8% of involvement in public policy activities. The greater the number of education/information sources, the greater the number of public policy activities nurses report having participated in.

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2015-12

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Implementing Breastfeeding Education Into a Perinatal Medication Assisted Recovery Program

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Opioid use disorder (OUD) is a chronic, complex health condition that continues to be a growing problem in the general population, and this increase is paralleled in pregnant women. Pregnancy is a time when women with OUD may be ready

Opioid use disorder (OUD) is a chronic, complex health condition that continues to be a growing problem in the general population, and this increase is paralleled in pregnant women. Pregnancy is a time when women with OUD may be ready to begin a journey of recovery. OUD has both maternal and fetal implications. The safest way to begin recovery during pregnancy is with the initiation of either buprenorphine or methadone to prevent symptoms of withdrawal which can increase risk of fetal harm.

Both medications have the added benefit of being safe to use during lactation. There is a minimal amount of either medication that is found in breastmilk. Breastfeeding during medication assisted recovery (MAR) is linked both to improved maternal and neonatal outcomes, and improved bonding. Often women who are engaged in MAR are unaware of the benefits of breastfeeding initiation and exclusivity. Mothers may perceive breastfeeding as a danger to their baby based on misinformation and bias. Initiation of individualized and nonjudgmental breastfeeding education to women beginning an inpatient MAR program can improve maternal understanding of the benefits of exclusive breastfeeding and increase intention to exclusively breastfeed.

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2020-05-02