Matching Items (10)

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Latina Women in STEM: How Race and Class Shape the Experiences of Undergraduate Women in STEM Majors at Arizona State University

Description

Women and people of color are some of the most underrepresented groups in the STEM field (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics). The purpose of this study was to uncover the

Women and people of color are some of the most underrepresented groups in the STEM field (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics). The purpose of this study was to uncover the barriers that undergraduate Hispanic women, as well as other women of color, face while pursuing an education in a STEM-related major at Arizona State University (ASU). In-depth interviews were conducted with 13 adult participants to dig deeper into the experiences of each woman and analyze how race and class overlap in each of the women's experiences. The concept of intersectionality was used to highlight various barriers such as perceptions of working versus middle-class students, the experience of being a first-generation college student, diversity campus-wide and in the classroom, effects of stereotyping, and impacts of mentorships. All women, no matter their gender, race, or socioeconomic status, faced struggles with stereotyping, marginalization, and isolation. Women in STEM majors at ASU performed better when provided with positive mentorships and grew aspirations to become a professional in the STEM field when encouraged and guided by someone who helped them build their scientific identities. Working-class women suffered from severe stress related to finances, family support, employment, and stereotyping. Reforming the culture of STEM fields in higher education will allow women to achieve success, further build their scientific identities, and increase the rate of women graduating with STEM degrees.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Barret Nursing Mentorship Program: A Pilot Study

Description

Mentorship is important to learning because it provides a frame of reference and the guidance necessary to succeed for those who are inexperienced. The purpose of this study was to

Mentorship is important to learning because it provides a frame of reference and the guidance necessary to succeed for those who are inexperienced. The purpose of this study was to explore the impact of a one-semester mentorship program for freshman Barrett nursing students. Specifically, it was hypothesized that freshman Barrett nursing students (mentees) would experience higher levels of confidence as they enter their second year. With improved confidence and better preparation in handling stress, freshman Barrett students are more likely to stay in the Barrett program throughout their time at a university in the southwestern United States. The mentorship program included freshman Barrett students pursuing a degree in nursing as the mentees and Term 8 (senior) Barrett Nursing students as the mentors. The mentorship program supported freshman students in reaching out to their mentors for study tips, class advice, homework help, and use them as a general resource throughout the application process. Quantitative data was collected in a pre- and post-survey in order to analyze the confidence scores of mentors and mentees. The survey asked participants questions regarding their level of self-confidence and asked them to rank their responses on a Likert scale with 1 being strongly disagree and 5 being strongly agree. The results showed that confidence levels based on the quantitative data either stayed the same or was improved in every participant. Specifically, there were multiple statistically significant findings based on the paired t-tests that were run. Findings suggest the mentorship program improved the confidence levels in both freshman Barrett students and their Senior mentors.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-12

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Peer Mentorship in Higher Education

Description

It is widely accepted that mentorship between people of similar backgrounds and slightly different ages is a mutually beneficial partnership (e.g., Angelique, Kyle, & Taylor, 2002; Yomtov, 2017). Mentoring relationships

It is widely accepted that mentorship between people of similar backgrounds and slightly different ages is a mutually beneficial partnership (e.g., Angelique, Kyle, & Taylor, 2002; Yomtov, 2017). Mentoring relationships exist in many forms across the education spectrum, from middle school students interacting with their younger peers to the popular “Big-Little system” adopted by fraternity and sorority groups in U.S. colleges and universities, and beyond educational settings throughout the working world. However, one place where mentoring has received relatively less attention, from researchers as well as from practitioners, is in undergraduate student leadership-focused organizations at the college level.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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Using a Longitudinal Case Study to Teach Warfarin Concepts to Prelicensure and Postbaccalaureate Nursing Students: A Peer Evaluation

Description

The purpose of this study was to determine whether a peer nursing student who presents a longitudinal case study on warfarin in a pharmacology course classroom influences prelicensure and postbaccalaureate

The purpose of this study was to determine whether a peer nursing student who presents a longitudinal case study on warfarin in a pharmacology course classroom influences prelicensure and postbaccalaureate nursing students' knowledge and perceived knowledge about warfarin. The study was a descriptive design that used a convenience sample of baccalaureate nursing students enrolled in two pharmacology courses. All participating students answered warfarin case-study questions and completed a self-demographic questionnaire, a knowledge pretest and posttest, and a self-efficacy questionnaire after the activity, which evaluated students' knowledge and perceived knowledge on 11 warfarin concepts. For all students (N = 89), the number of correct answers improved significantly between pretests and posttests for Items 2-11 (p < .0001; Wilcoxon signed-rank tests), which evaluated students' knowledge on warfarin's site of action, associated laboratory values, use of vitamin K, and food-drug interactions. However, no significant difference was seen in the number of correct answers for warfarin's mechanism of action. Comparing prelicensure and postbaccalaureate groups by Mann-Whitney tests, no significant difference was seen for pretest total scores (median 7.00, n = 55; median 7.50, n = 34; respectively; p = .399). Similarly, no difference was seen for posttest total scores by groups (prelicensure: median = 9.00, n =54; postbaccalaureate: median = 10.00, n = 32; p = .344). Overall, students in both groups agreed that they could identify and explain all 11 warfarin concepts. The Pearson correlation between the total posttest and total self-efficacy scores for the combined group was .338 (p = .003), demonstrating a low but significant correlation between students' posttest total scores and their perceived warfarin knowledge, as evaluated by the self-efficacy questionnaire.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014-12

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Building Bridges: Discovering Ways to Connect Barrett Students with Barrett Summer Scholars Alumni to Increase Academic Success

Description

Through interviews with student participants in Barrett Summer Scholars during 2012, I uncovered how education in Arizona is failing and succeeding in meeting the needs of its high-achieving, oftentimes academically

Through interviews with student participants in Barrett Summer Scholars during 2012, I uncovered how education in Arizona is failing and succeeding in meeting the needs of its high-achieving, oftentimes academically disillusioned students. Many high-achieving students feel underserved by their education and do not receive adequate challenges or one-on-one attention. Socioeconomic, ethnic, and racial limitations further contribute to the disenchantment of students and educational inequalities in the US and Arizona in particular. The Barrett Summer Scholars program itself intends to help engage these students, but it may be failing in its stated goals. Limited resources make it difficult for schools to pay as much attention to the high-achieving students as to the low-achieving, but Barrett might be able to help bridge this gap and provide students with one-on-one attention by way of student mentorship.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

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Bridging the Gap Through Collaboration: The ASU Library Barrett Honors College Peer Mentor Program

Description

The transforming skills that lead to exceptional academic results are writing and research. While it is the role of academic librarians to provide the appropriate resources to facilitate research, arguably

The transforming skills that lead to exceptional academic results are writing and research. While it is the role of academic librarians to provide the appropriate resources to facilitate research, arguably students are more willing to rely on their fellow students than professional library assistance. At Arizona State University’s Barrett, The Honors College, trained and motivated students are serving as Peer Mentors who assist student research needs without the "stigma" of asking a Librarian for help.

The panel discusses and elucidate components of a student-to-student peer program and cover comprehensive planning aspects of personnel, communication and workflow methodologies, interdisciplinary representation, and competency building activities. They will share training and work protocols, focusing on the evolution of the program from conceptualization through implementation. The presentation is an interactive conversation between the panelists (covering varying aspects and perspectives of the program) and the audience.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-10-31

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Mentorship Matters: Understanding the Impact of Mentorship for Advanced Practice Providers

Description

Nurse practitioners and physician assistants, collectively termed advanced practice providers (APPs), report a lack of onboarding and professional support which has been shown to lead to job dissatisfaction, high turnover

Nurse practitioners and physician assistants, collectively termed advanced practice providers (APPs), report a lack of onboarding and professional support which has been shown to lead to job dissatisfaction, high turnover rates, professional attrition, and gaps in patient care; wasting billions of healthcare dollars and falling short of the Quadruple Aim. A time-honored, integral means of support in many industries is mentorship. This is a dynamic, evolving relationship between an experienced professional and a novice professional that promotes knowledge application, systems navigation, organizational socialization and personal role integration.

Unfortunately, healthcare organizations have been slow to adopt mentorship, as evidenced by the paucity of studies on mentorship programs in health care, and APP turnover rates twice that of physicians. This evidenced-based project expands on the limited existing studies regarding the associations between mentorship and organizational commitment, as well as explores the desired characteristics of quality mentors and perceived barriers to APP mentorship.

A survey of multispecialty APPs at an oncology practice within a larger, multi-state integrated healthcare delivery system reveals access to mentors and time are the biggest barriers. The most desired mentorship characteristics are professional knowledge and motivational support. Career development through mentorship can increase job satisfaction and retention, as well as improve the quality of care provided by APPs. By strengthening the professional foundations, patients will benefit with continuity of care, improved quality measures, and efficient systems communication reaching the Quadruple Aim targets.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-04-30

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Beyond Numbers: Assessing the Impact of RISE Tutoring on the Phoenix Refugee Community

Description

RISE Tutoring is an ASU student organization which helps refugee youth achieve academic and personal success through tutoring and mentorship. As a member of RISE Tutoring for three years, the

RISE Tutoring is an ASU student organization which helps refugee youth achieve academic and personal success through tutoring and mentorship. As a member of RISE Tutoring for three years, the researcher sought to document and analyze the program’s impact on the Phoenix refugee community. It was determined that video documentation, with its ability to capture both visual and verbal testimony, was the ideal holistic approach to assess and share this impact. The researcher hypothesized that RISE Tutoring adds value to the lives of its tutors and students through the multidimensional growth––educational, personal, and cultural––it facilitates for all. Methods of data collection were limited to video and audio, but approval from the Institutional Review Board and consent from all participants were obtained prior to the project’s start. The final video, filmed and edited with the help of a professional videographer, was 20 minutes and 21 seconds in length. The findings derived from the recorded interviews with students, tutors, and community leaders, and from the footage of tutoring and group activities, validated the researcher’s hypothesis. Viewers of the video can witness the bonding of tutors and students; hear the pride in the voices of the tutors and see the passion in their eyes when they speak of their students; and feel the joy and excitement that the program brings to its students’ lives. This project transformed the personal experiences of participants into a collective RISE Tutoring identity which can now be presented, for the first time, to the public. The video also aimed to help RISE Tutoring share its meaningful work and improve its marketing efforts, thereby enabling the organization to recruit more tutors and students, build new partnerships, and fundraise. Through the fulfillment of these goals, the video will empower the organization to effect greater change in the community.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

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Supporting K-12 online learners: developing a mentorship program

Description

Online education is unique in part for the relatively high degrees of autonomy afforded learners. Self-direction and self-regulation, along with support, are essential for students to succeed. The site of

Online education is unique in part for the relatively high degrees of autonomy afforded learners. Self-direction and self-regulation, along with support, are essential for students to succeed. The site of this action research project was a new, small online public charter school for middle and high school students, Foothills Academy Connected (FAC). The purpose of this action research project was to develop an online learner support system that was built around mentorship and based on the four areas identified by the Educational Success Prediction Instrument (ESPRI) (Roblyer & Davis, 2008); thoroughly document the process; and examine its influence on students and the researcher. This study was focused on: (a) identifying students’ main challenges with online learning, (b) identifying students’ perceptions about additional supports that would improve their schooling experience, and (c) examining the process of engaging in mentorship by the emerging mentor, herself.

The study employed a mixed methods research design. Research instruments included a questionnaire adapted from the ESPRI that marked the start of the study period, visual autoethnographies, interviews, extensive research journaling to document interactions with students and parents/guardians, and a second questionnaire. The research results showed that the “emerging mentorship approach” was a worthwhile innovation for augmenting the FAC online learner student support system. In particular, developing individual student profiles based on this varied data and responding to those students’ needs were accompanied by detailed documentation to develop a mentoring approach that could be used subsequently. A finding of the research was that the ESPRI would not have been effective alone in determining a student profile and responding only on that basis. The ESPRI areas of inquiry were helpful when used in conjunction with the other data to frame students’ needs and formulate personalized plans to support struggling online learners. Online learner support literature provided scant detail on the personal experience of the individual adopting the mentor role. In this study, it was determined that the process of becoming a mentor was uncomfortable and nonlinear, and it challenged the self-directedness and boldness of the action researcher as she worked in this new role as mentor.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017

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Social learning in context: group homies, mentorship, and social support

Description

Social learning theory has enjoyed decades of supportive research and has been applied to a wide range of criminal and deviant behavior. Still eluding criminological theorists, however, is a meaningful

Social learning theory has enjoyed decades of supportive research and has been applied to a wide range of criminal and deviant behavior. Still eluding criminological theorists, however, is a meaningful understanding of the causal processes underlying social learning. This lack of knowledge is due in part to a relative reluctance to examine value transmission as a process in the contexts of mentorship, role modeling, and social learning. With this empirical gap in mind, the present study seeks to isolate and classify meaningful themes in mentorship through loosely structured interviews with young men on the periphery of the criminal processing system. The purposive sample is drawn from youth in a Southwestern state, living in a state-funded, privately run group home for children of unfit, incarcerated, or deported/undocumented parents. The youth included in the study have recently passed the age of eighteen, and have elected to stay in the group home on a voluntary basis pending the completion of a High School diploma. Further, both the subjects and the researcher participate in a program which imparts mentorship through art projects, free expression, and ongoing, semi-structured exposure to prosocial adults. This study therefore provides a unique opportunity to explore qualitatively social learning concepts through the eyes of troubled youth, and to generate new lines of theory to facilitate the empirical testing of social learning as a process. Implications for future research are discussed.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2012