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Designing Social Behaviors

Description

Today, successful design is not only pleasing to the eye but may also help to manage social behaviors which can lead to increased satisfaction and increased revenue for clients. Designers function as problem solvers to provide solutions to challenges certain

Today, successful design is not only pleasing to the eye but may also help to manage social behaviors which can lead to increased satisfaction and increased revenue for clients. Designers function as problem solvers to provide solutions to challenges certain spaces face promoting or driving desired human interaction through effective design of the built environment. The experience-based economy of the 21st century prompts companies to attempt to stage an experience by connecting on a personal level with consumers in order to create value and support consumer needs. In experience-based design, interior design embraces social psychology by structuring the built environment to function as a tool to manage social interactions. Due to the nature of the human animal, social interactions in turn alter the culture of a specific place in an iterative process. Through this dynamic relationship, interior design can seek to either support the culture or function of a place and its users or work to effect change.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2016-05

Designing an Affordable, Air Purifying Helmet to Protect Motorcyclists from Pollution in Developing Countries

Description

This project is an Industrial Design concept development using personal research from developing Southeast Asian countries. The scope of the project is from initial conception, research, ideation, computer modeling and rendering.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2014-05

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Office design: an exploration of worker satisfaction and their perceptions of effective workspaces

Description

ABSTRACT Recent studies indicate that top-performing companies have higher-performing work environments than average companies. They receive higher scores for worker satisfaction with their overall physical work environment as well as higher effectiveness ratings for their workspaces (Gensler, 2008; Harter et

ABSTRACT Recent studies indicate that top-performing companies have higher-performing work environments than average companies. They receive higher scores for worker satisfaction with their overall physical work environment as well as higher effectiveness ratings for their workspaces (Gensler, 2008; Harter et al., 2003). While these studies indicate a relationship between effective office design and satisfaction they have not explored which specific space types may contribute to workers' overall satisfaction with their physical work environment. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to explore the relationship between workers' overall satisfaction with their physical work environments and their perception of the effectiveness of spaces designed for Conceptual Age work including learning, focusing, collaborating, and socializing tasks. This research is designed to identify which workspace types are related to workers' satisfaction with their overall work environment and which are perceived to be most and least effective. To accomplish this two primary and four secondary research questions were developed for this study. The first primary question considers overall workers' satisfaction with their overall physical work environments (offices, workstations, hallways, common areas, reception, waiting areas, etc.) related to the effective use of work mode workspaces (learning, focusing, collaborating, socializing). The second primary research question was developed to identify which of the four work mode space types had the greatest and least relationship to workers' satisfaction with the overall physical work environment. Secondary research questions were developed to address workers' perceptions of effectiveness of each space type. This research project used data from a previous study collected from 2007 to 2012. Responses were from all staff levels of US office-based office workers and resulted in a blind sample of approximately 48,000 respondents. The data for this study were developed from SPSS data reports that included descriptive data and Pearson correlations. Findings were developed from those statistics using coefficient of determination.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2013

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Using design to make the home whole: meaning and the model home : Arizona in the 1950s

Description

Scholars have written much about home and meaning, yet they have said little about the professionally furnished model home viewed as a cultural artifact. Nor is there literature addressing how the home building industry uses these spaces to promote images

Scholars have written much about home and meaning, yet they have said little about the professionally furnished model home viewed as a cultural artifact. Nor is there literature addressing how the home building industry uses these spaces to promote images of family life to increase sales. This research notes that not only do the structure, design, and layout of the model home formulate cultural identity but also the furnishings and materials within. Together, the model home and carefully selected artifacts placed therein help to express specific chosen lifestyles as that the home builder determines. This thesis considers the model home as constructed as well as builder's publications, descriptions, and advertisements. The research recognizes the many facets of merchandising, consumerism, and commercialism influencing the design and architecture of the suburban home. Historians of visual and cultural studies often investigate these issues as separate components. By contrast, this thesis offers an integrated framework of inquiry, drawing upon such disciplines as cultural history, anthropology, and material culture. The research methodology employs two forms of content analysis - image and text. The study analyzes 36 model homes built in Phoenix, Arizona, during the period 1955-1956. The thesis explores how the builder sends a message, i.e. images, ideals, and aspirations, to the potential home buyer through the design and decoration of the model home. It then speculates how the home buyer responds to those messages. The symbiotic relationship between the sender and receiver, together, tells a story about the Phoenix lifestyle and the domestic ideals of the 1950s. Builders sent messages surrounding convenience, spaciousness, added luxury, and indoor-outdoor living to a growing and discriminating home buying market.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2013

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Imagineering healthcare: a healing environment design model based on experiential design, authenticity and Disney's design approaches

Description

Healthcare is one of the most personal and complex services provided, and as such, designing healthcare environments is particularly challenging. In the last couple of decades, researchers have concentrated their efforts on exploring the elements of the hospital environment that

Healthcare is one of the most personal and complex services provided, and as such, designing healthcare environments is particularly challenging. In the last couple of decades, researchers have concentrated their efforts on exploring the elements of the hospital environment that affect patients' health and in finding ways to apply that knowledge in contemporary healthcare design. But despite the growing body of research, there is an element of utmost importance to healing environments that has not been studied very extensively: the patient experience. The interaction of patients with their environment shapes their personal experience, and inversely, focusing on designing experiences rather than services can inform the design of successful healing environments. This shift from designing services to designing experiences has deep implications in healthcare settings because of the stressful situations that patients have to go through; memorable experiences have a positive influence on a patient's emotional health because they help minimize stress and in healthcare environments this translates into improved outcomes. The concept of assembling experiences is not new, especially in the entertainment industry; it was, in fact, the underlying principle behind the creation of the first theme park more than fifty years ago: Disneyland. Today, Disney is an entertainment industry leader and their design concepts and practices have been perfected to achieve the Company's main purpose: to immerse Guests in a happy, unforgettable experience. This research study focuses on examining the principles used by Disney designers, or Imagineers, as they are called within the organization, to generate memorable experiences, and how those theories can be adopted and adapted by healthcare designers to create better healing environments. However, Disney's Imagineering is not the only approach considered in this research. A thorough analysis would not be complete without delving into the concept of experiential design as a design process and from an economical perspective, as well as without analyzing recent notions about the importance of authenticity in businesses and its implications on design. This study, therefore, suggests a new healing environment design model based on a comprehensive review of the literature related to three main design approaches: Disney Imagineering, experiential design and authenticity.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2012

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Scents of efficiency: discovering how olfactory stimuli affect caregiver performance in a simulated emergency department

Description

Research has shown that the ability to smell is the most direct sense an individual can experience. With every breath a person takes, the brain recognizes thousands of molecules and makes connections with our memories to determine their composition. With

Research has shown that the ability to smell is the most direct sense an individual can experience. With every breath a person takes, the brain recognizes thousands of molecules and makes connections with our memories to determine their composition. With the amount of research looking into how and why we smell, researchers still have little understanding of how the nose and brain process an aroma, and how emotional and physical behavior is impacted. This research focused on the affects smell has on a caregiver in a simulated Emergency Department setting located in the SimET of Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center in Phoenix, Arizona. The study asked each participant to care for a programmed mannequin, or "patient", while performing simple computer-based tasks, including memory and recall, multi-tasking, and mood-mapping to gauge physical and mental performance. Three different aromatic environments were then introduced through diffusion and indirect inhalation near the participants' task space: 1) a control (no smell), 2) an odor (simulated dirty feet), and 3) an aroma (one of four true essential oils plus a current odor-eliminating compound used in many U.S. Emergency Departments). This study was meant to produce a stressful environment by leading the caregiver to stay in constant movement throughout the study through timed tasks, uncooperative equipment, and a needy "patient". The goal of this research was to determine if smells, and of what form of pleasantness and repulsiveness, can have an effect on the physical and mental performance of emergency caregivers. Findings from this study indicated that the "odor eliminating" method currently used in typical Emergency Departments, coffee grounds, is more problematic than helpful, and the introduction of true essential oils may not only reduce stress, but increase efficiency and, in turn, job satisfaction.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2013

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Nature inspired interior design principles in the hot arid climate of Saudi Arabia

Description

Biomimicry is an approach that entails understanding the natural system and designs and mimicking them to create new non-biological systems that can solve human problems. From bio-based material development to biologically inspired designs, architects and designers excelled in highlighting the

Biomimicry is an approach that entails understanding the natural system and designs and mimicking them to create new non-biological systems that can solve human problems. From bio-based material development to biologically inspired designs, architects and designers excelled in highlighting the fascination of integrating the biomimetic thinking process into the modern design that provides more comfortable space in which to live. This thesis explores how historical sustainable strategies from Islamic traditional architecture incorporated natural design system that could now be appropriately applied to interior architecture. In addition, it explores the current existing problems in this field and the possibilities of biomimetic sustainable solutions for existing buildings in the hot dry climate regions of Saudi Arabia.

The author concentrates on examining Islamic traditional architecture where the past architects incorporated certain aspects of nature in their construction and through using local resources, built buildings that mitigated heat and provided protection from cold. As a result of completing this research, it was found that there are common characteristics between the traditional Islamic architecture elements and system solutions found in some natural organisms. Characteristics included, for example, evaporative cooling, stuck effect, and avoiding heat gain. However, in the natural world, there is always opportunities to further explore more about the impacts of biomimicry and natural strategies applicable to enhance interior environments of buildings.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2016

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Understanding the Biophilia Hypothesis through a Comparative Analysis of Residential Typologies in Phoenix, São Paulo, and Tokyo

Description

ABSTRACT

Recent studies indicate that there is a positive influence of nature and nature integrated built environments on human health and wellness in various physical, physiological and social domains. This thesis critically reviews formally and contextually three distinct residential typologies designed

ABSTRACT

Recent studies indicate that there is a positive influence of nature and nature integrated built environments on human health and wellness in various physical, physiological and social domains. This thesis critically reviews formally and contextually three distinct residential typologies designed by renowned architects Frank Lloyd Wright (1867-1959), Lina Bo Bardi (1914-1992), and Ryue Nishizawa (1966-), in different periods and countries; the United States of America (USA), Brazil and Japan. Yet, the buildings analyzed in the research are relatively connected by means of nature and the natural elements in their constructed essence. This research focuses on the features of the buildings that characterize the Biophilic Design, along with theoretical and practical ideas of the architects behind each building in their own process of formation.

The Biophilic Design Framework has been developed out of the Biophilia Hypothesis (Fromm, 1973; Wilson, 1984) which puts forward an explanatory suggestion that human affinity and affiliation with nature are based on genetic and environmental adaptation processes. This research is designed to display how specific natural phenomena apply to the built environment within the Framework of Biophilic Design (Kellert, & Calabrese, 2015) and how the Biophilia Hypothesis translates into the built environment. To accomplish this, two primary and three secondary research questions were developed for the study. The research will provide an understanding of the Biophilia Hypothesis and its impact on the built environment through the evaluation of research variables on the case studies using the ‘twenty-four attributes’ indicated in the ‘three experiences’ of Biophilic Design.

These architects’ approaches and the methods applied theoretically and practically to these research sites were unveiled and analyzed through three case studies. A positive correlation regarding the success of the case studies and their Biophilic characteristics is found by analyzing the research sites and critiques from the authorities in written literature. The applicability of the ‘Biophilic Design Framework’ was found and evidenced by the findings from these case studies designed by master architects and located in different climates, regions and contexts.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2017

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A comparative analysis of museums in Paris, Barcelona, and Phoenix

Description

The research titled “A Comparative Analysis of Museums in Paris, Barcelona,

and Phoenix” critically reviews six museums in three culturally diverse countries. This research looks at features within marketing, space, and branding which may or may not differ depending on socio-cultural

The research titled “A Comparative Analysis of Museums in Paris, Barcelona,

and Phoenix” critically reviews six museums in three culturally diverse countries. This research looks at features within marketing, space, and branding which may or may not differ depending on socio-cultural factors, histories, traditions, etc. in Spain, France, and the United States. A conclusion is formed around the identity of each museum through the variables of marketing, space, and branding.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2016

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The influence of the built environment of the workplaces on the workers' well-being: a study towards enhancing prime working age workers' productivity through interior design

Description

Workplaces are the place where people spend mostly half of their life there. It is not exclusive to office buildings and companies; indeed, in each department in every building there are individuals working behind the scenes in an attempt to

Workplaces are the place where people spend mostly half of their life there. It is not exclusive to office buildings and companies; indeed, in each department in every building there are individuals working behind the scenes in an attempt to better the society. The workplace environment must accomplish workers’ requirements that vary between physical, emotional, psychological, and spiritual needs. Thus, the employees can provide high performance and be more productive, which leads to a successful group, corporations, society, and world generally. The aims for this study were to explore the different strategies that big companies used to attract new employees and to ensure the well-being of the current workers within workplaces. In addition to investigating the effects of the workplace environment on the workers’ well-being in the previous studies, this research analyzes six cases of good examples for companies' headquarters and evaluating their design techniques. The results showed that these companies share the same factors to increase their workers’ well-being. Flexible workspaces that provide workers the ability to choose where, how, and when to work is the first factor. Promoting body movements, reducing stress and depression, and building private spaces or facilities to energize workers are other factors. However, most of the cases involved the inspirational encouragement in interior design as major factors to enhance workers’ well-being. Furthermore, some of the applied techniques in the buildings are similar, like offering a flexible workplace, while others vary following the company industry, image and location.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2019