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Designing an Affordable, Air Purifying Helmet to Protect Motorcyclists from Pollution in Developing Countries

Description

This project is an Industrial Design concept development using personal research from developing Southeast Asian countries. The scope of the project is from initial conception, research, ideation, computer modeling and rendering.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2014-05

Cultivating Comfort: Exploring the Connections Between Scandinavian Design & Wellness

Description

The look and feel of one’s environment, be it built or organic, has great influence on mood, behavior, and general comfort. Through exploratory qualitative research, this study intends to explore the presence of wellness features in Scandinavian Design throughout the

The look and feel of one’s environment, be it built or organic, has great influence on mood, behavior, and general comfort. Through exploratory qualitative research, this study intends to explore the presence of wellness features in Scandinavian Design throughout the growth of the Scandinavian modern movement, and how these practices may be integrated and adapted in both commercial and residential design in the United States (U.S.). What do Scandinavian designers perceive as the essential traits of the Scandinavian design style, and what relationship, if any, exists between these traits and the concept of wellness? To answer this question, the researcher made use of a purposive sampling method based on exploratory qualitative research methodology, conducting three in-person, semi-structured interviews and extracting themes based on thematic coding. During data analysis three primary themes were identified: sustainability, materiality, and community. The data reported in this study provides some insight into Scandinavian designers’ perceptions of their own practices, and begins to connect these factors to a more global approach to architecture and design.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2020-05

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An exploratory study: examining emergency department design-layout and nursing physical fatigue

Description

ABSTRACT Nursing physical fatigue is a critical issue that may lead to degradation of care delivery and ultimately result in medical errors. This issue is equally relevant due to the looming shortage of nurses, which has been linked to the

ABSTRACT Nursing physical fatigue is a critical issue that may lead to degradation of care delivery and ultimately result in medical errors. This issue is equally relevant due to the looming shortage of nurses, which has been linked to the physical demands and potential occupational hazards intrinsic to the profession; as well as to the graying of the nursing workforce who experiences gradual loss of strength and agility that accompanies aging as time in the career advances. In a hospital Emergency Department, the level of nursing physical fatigue can potentially reach its threshold in light of challenging workloads, scope of job assignments and demanding schedules. While in other safety-sensitive industries such as aviation and nuclear plants, similar concerns have been the object of systematic research and addressed with consequent regulations, just recently, the healthcare sector has been engaged in further investigations. This study proposed to explore the linkage between Emergency Department design-layout and nursing physical fatigue. It was expected that further understanding on this relationship would support evidence-based design propositions linking nursing wellness, job satisfaction, and performance to a higher quality of care and improved patient safety levels. To this end, data collection was performed during four weeks in a community-based hospital. A convenience sample of twenty-four eligible nurses was invited to participate in this two-part study. The first section consisted of the completion of a self-administered questionnaire, which assessed nurses' perception of the impact of working conditions on nursing physical fatigue. The second section included the monitoring, through the use of accelerometers, of nurses' actual activity intensity levels during three consecutive shifts. Among other findings, data demonstrated that nurses perceive several attributes or components of the built environment as potential contributors to physical fatigue. In addition, various operational practices and organizational protocols were linked to physical fatigue. Contrary to nurses' perception of physical fatigue, their actual physical activity levels fell mostly between sedentary or light intensity ranges. This paradox offers the opportunity for design interventions that, in alignment with operational practices and organizational protocols will enhance nurses' performance and improve nurses' retention.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2011

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ITEM towards an integrated transformational experience model for design education

Description

Individuals' experiences, environment, and education greatly impact their entire being. Similarly, a designer is affected by these elements, which impacts how, what and why they design. In order for design education to generate designers who are more socially aware problem

Individuals' experiences, environment, and education greatly impact their entire being. Similarly, a designer is affected by these elements, which impacts how, what and why they design. In order for design education to generate designers who are more socially aware problem solvers, that education must introduce complex social matters and not just design skills. Traditionally designers learned through apprenticing a master. Most design education has moved away from this traditional model and has begun incorporating a well-rounded program of study, yet there are still more improvements to be made. This research proposes a new Integrated Transformational Experience Model, ITEM, for design education which will be rooted in sustainability, cultural integration, social embeddedness, and discipline collaboration. The designer will be introduced to new ideas and experiences from the immersion of current social issues where they will gain experience creating solutions to global problems enabling them to become catalysts of change. This research is based on interviews with industrial design students to gain insights, benefits and drawbacks of the current model of design education. This research will expand on the current model for design education, combining new ideas that will shed light on the future of design disciplines through the education and motivation of designers. The desired outcome of this study is to incorporate hands on learning through social issues in design classrooms, identify ways to educate future problem solvers, and inspire more research on this issue.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2011

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Interior design: credentials and certification as an alternative to legislation

Description

There is a conflict in the profession of interior design over regulation through legislation. For some organizations and individuals, regulation via legislation is the next perceived step in the professionalization process which has been evolving for over 40 years and

There is a conflict in the profession of interior design over regulation through legislation. For some organizations and individuals, regulation via legislation is the next perceived step in the professionalization process which has been evolving for over 40 years and is needed to protect the health, safety and welfare (HSW) of the public. For other organizations and individuals, legislation is deemed unnecessary and an affront to the free trade market and serves only to create anti-competitive barriers resulting in the formation of a "design cartel" (Campo-Flores, 2011; Carpenter, 2007). Research exists on the professionalization of interior design and on the reasons stated for and against legislation (ASID, 2010, Anderson, Honey, Dudek, 2007, Martin, 2008). However, there is little research on understanding how the actual stake-holders view legislation. For the purpose of this research, the stake-holders are the professional interior designers themselves. The purpose of this study was to examine the current status of relevant issues to the subject of regulation in interior design and to pose the question if there is an option to legislation. If so, could third party certification be an acceptable alternative? An on-line survey was developed and posted on interior design networking sites on LinkedIn. The results of the survey suggest that interior designers are completely divided on the issue of legislation but favorably view certification. The survey has also revealed the lack of understanding of the legislative process in interior design and confusion in the role that interior design organizations play. The study has also revealed that interior designers identify the distorted view the public has of this industry as a problem. Interior designers surveyed in this study see a need to separate commercial and residential interior design. Overall, this study has concluded that interior designers would actually prefer a certification process to legislation.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2011

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Pattern language: a design tool for collaborative work environments

Description

Interior design continues to re-define itself as a discipline that presents designers with new problems that require innovative solutions. This is particularly true in the case in office design. The transformation of the office environment from the standard bullpen configuration

Interior design continues to re-define itself as a discipline that presents designers with new problems that require innovative solutions. This is particularly true in the case in office design. The transformation of the office environment from the standard bullpen configuration to today's dynamic, flexible, and open floor plans has required new design methodologies that incorporate tools and technologies that are readily available to interior designers. Today, increased use of teams in the workplace challenges interior designers to create environments that accommodate both group and individual tasks (Brill, Weidermann & BOSTI associates, 2001). Collaboration has received considerable attention as organizations focus on productivity and reducing costs to compete in a global economy (Hassanain, 2006). Designers and architects should learn to create environments that respond to dynamic, moveable, and flexible work methods. This web-based research study explores the use of pattern language as a new tool for designing collaborative work environments. In 1977, Christopher Alexander and his associates developed `Pattern language' (Alexander, Ishikawa & Silverstein, 1977) as a design formulation methodology. It consists of a series of interrelated physical elements combined to create a framework for design solutions. This pattern language tool for collaborative work environments was created based on research by Lori Anthony (2001). This study further builds upon current trends and research in collaborative work environments. The researcher conducted a pilot test by sending the web-based tool and an online questionnaire to all graduate students and faculty members in the fields of interior design and healthcare and healing environment (HHE). After testing its validity in The Design School at Arizona State University, the same tool and questionnaire was sent to the employees of one of the leading architecture and interior design firms in Phoenix, AZ. The results showed that among those design professionals surveyed, the majority believe pattern language could be a valuable design tool. The insights obtained from this study will provide designers, architects, and facility managers with a new design tool to aid in creating effective collaborative spaces in a work environment.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2011

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Pain center waiting room design: an exploration of the relationship between pain, comfort and positive distraction

Description

"Too often, people in pain are stuck in limbo. With no diagnosis there is no prognosis. They feel that without knowing what is wrong, there is no way to make it right" (Lewandowski, 2006, p. ix). Research has shown that

"Too often, people in pain are stuck in limbo. With no diagnosis there is no prognosis. They feel that without knowing what is wrong, there is no way to make it right" (Lewandowski, 2006, p. ix). Research has shown that environmental factors, such as views of nature, positive distractions and natural light can reduce anxiety and pain (Ulrich, 1984). Patients with chronic, painful diseases are often worried, anxious and tired. Doctor's appointments for those with a chronic pain diagnosis can be devastating (Gilron, Peter, Watson, Cahill, & Moulin, 2006). The research question explored in this study is: Does the layout, seating and elements of positive distraction in the pain center waiting room relate to the patients experience of pain and distress? This study utilized a mixed-method approach. A purposive sample of 39 individuals participated in the study. The study employed the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS), the Lewandowski Pain Scale (LPS) and a researcher developed Spatial Perception Instrument (SPI) rating the appearance and comfort of a pain center waiting room in a large metropolitan area. Results indicated that there were no significant correlations between pain, distress and the waiting room environment. It is intended that this study will provide a framework for future research in the area of chronic pain and distress in order to advance the understanding of research in the waiting area environment and the effect it may have on the patient.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2012

The influence of the Exposition des arts décoratifs et industriels modernes, Paris 1925 on Hollywood films of the late 1920s and 30s

Description

The author explores the influences on the interiors of Hollywood films of the late 1920s and 30s. The Exposition des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes, Paris 1925 is examined in historical context and its influence on design trends internationally.

The

The author explores the influences on the interiors of Hollywood films of the late 1920s and 30s. The Exposition des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes, Paris 1925 is examined in historical context and its influence on design trends internationally.

The Hollywood film industry is examined, in general, and Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer and its longtime art director, Cedric Gibbons, in particular. Eight MGM films are discussed and their interiors analyzed for related influence from the 1925 Paris Exposition.

The thesis makes a case for the influence of the 1925 Paris Exposition on Cedric Gibbons and the interiors of the MGM films of the late 1920s and 30s.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2014

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Determining the designer's awareness of sustainable interior materials in Saudi Arabia

Description

The main aim of this thesis is to study the Saudi Arabia designers level of awareness about sustainable interior materials and to what extent are Saudi Arabia designers specifying sustainable interior materials in their interior designs? The problem statement relies

The main aim of this thesis is to study the Saudi Arabia designers level of awareness about sustainable interior materials and to what extent are Saudi Arabia designers specifying sustainable interior materials in their interior designs? The problem statement relies on understanding how does this may impact the Saudi Arabia environment. In order to comply with these objectives, a telephone interviews were built, to test the designer’s knowledge about sustainable interior materials. The results showed that the Saudi Arabia interior designers are not fully aware of sustainable interior materials and there is a lack of interest in applying sustainable interior materials in their projects.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2019

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How design impacts the social environment: a comparison between two pet cafés in China and the United States

Description

This research aims to investigate the social environment in a brand-new type of café, pet café, and to maximum the benefit of this type of cafe. While pet cafés, especially cat cafés, are becoming increasingly common in the United States

This research aims to investigate the social environment in a brand-new type of café, pet café, and to maximum the benefit of this type of cafe. While pet cafés, especially cat cafés, are becoming increasingly common in the United States (U.S.), Asian countries have been in this kind of business since 1998. The most common and popular is the cat café. Even though the owners of cat cafés in the U.S. have learned and imitated the cat café in Asia, the cultural differences and the restrictions resulted in differences in format and design.

Interior and furniture design was investigated to afford motivation to people who are pet lovers and can be potential customers. Most of the research about pets illustrates a positive influence on psychological health and social support. On the other hand, a café with pets can be attractive and interactive more than a general café, to offer a recreational activity and a comfortable social environment and therapy from pets.

Juxtaposing the cat café in the U.S. against the pet café in China, is explored to investigate the difference between these countries and how they can learn from each other and make improvements to design. Research on what is the difference between the cat café in the U.S. and China are reflected on two parts of outcomes—design and business.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2019