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Introducing Children to Communication and Language Differences through American Sign Language

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For this project the main goal was to create a curriculum aimed at fourth grade students. This curriculum was intended to introduce them to different forms of communication, and teach them the skills, attitudes, behavior, and knowledge that would enable

For this project the main goal was to create a curriculum aimed at fourth grade students. This curriculum was intended to introduce them to different forms of communication, and teach them the skills, attitudes, behavior, and knowledge that would enable them to be able to communicate and interact better with a wide range of people with different types of communication styles. American Sign Language was used for this curriculum as an example of an alternative communication method. The project included developing teaching materials and lessons which made up the curriculum, after that this curriculum was implemented with 11 fourth grade students.

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2014-05

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The Interaction of Word Complexity and Consonant Correctness in Spanish-Speaking Children

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This thesis investigated the impact of word complexity as measured through the Proportion of Whole Word Proximity (PWP; Ingram 2002) on consonant correctness as measured by the Percentage of Correct Consonants (PCC; Shriberg & Kwiatkowski 1980) on the spoken words

This thesis investigated the impact of word complexity as measured through the Proportion of Whole Word Proximity (PWP; Ingram 2002) on consonant correctness as measured by the Percentage of Correct Consonants (PCC; Shriberg & Kwiatkowski 1980) on the spoken words of monolingual Spanish-speaking children. The effect of word complexity on consonant correctness has previously been studied on English-speaking children (Knodel 2012); the present study extends this line of research to determine if it can be appropriately applied to Spanish. Language samples from a previous study were used (Hase, 2010) in which Spanish-speaking children were given two articulation assessments: Evaluación fonológica del habla infantil (FON; Bosch Galceran, 2004), and the Spanish Test of Articulation for Children Under Three Years of Age (STAR; Bunta, 2002). It was hypothesized that word complexity would affect a Spanish-speaking child’s productions of correct consonants as was seen for the English- speaking children studied. This hypothesis was supported for 10 out of the 14 children. The pattern of word complexity found for Spanish was as follows: CVCV > CVCVC, Tri-syllables no clusters > Disyllable words with clusters.

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2013-12