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The Effects of Family Separation on Latina Young Adult Mental Health

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The Latinx population in the United States is projected to increase exponentially in upcoming years. Latina women in particular are put at disproportionate risk of experiencing psychological distress after immigrating to the US. Separation from family upon immigration introduces more

The Latinx population in the United States is projected to increase exponentially in upcoming years. Latina women in particular are put at disproportionate risk of experiencing psychological distress after immigrating to the US. Separation from family upon immigration introduces more difficulty to the immigration experience. Yet protective factors such as family cohesion may buffer potential psychological distress. The present study will examine the two following research questions. First, is there a difference in psychological distress experienced by Latina young women who report separating from their family in comparison to those who did not experience familial separation at immigration. Second, does a potentially deleterious effect of immigration on familial attachment underlie or mediate the hypothesized positive association between separation at immigration and psychological distress. Participants were Latina young women who ranged from 18-23 years-old, were unmarried, and had to have resided in the US for 36 months or less. I used structural path analysis to examine hypothesized associations among separation status, attachment to family, and psychological distress. Findings aim to inform mental health interventions for Latina young adults who immigrate to the US without family.

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2021

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Sexual Identity Self-Labeling, Developmental Statuses, and Traditional Gender Norms Among Latino Men Who Have Sex with Men: Criterion Related Validity Estimates for the Measure of Sexual Identity Exploration and Commitment (MoSIEC)

Description

Latino men who have sex with men (LMSM) may repress gay, bisexual identities due to internalized homophobia and other sociocultural influences. The impact of Latino traditional gender roles, machismo and caballerismo, have not been examined with LMSM who may or

Latino men who have sex with men (LMSM) may repress gay, bisexual identities due to internalized homophobia and other sociocultural influences. The impact of Latino traditional gender roles, machismo and caballerismo, have not been examined with LMSM who may or may not identify as gay or bisexual. The purpose of the present study is to examine relations between self-labeled sexual identity, sexual identity developmental status, and traditional gender norms among Latino men who have sex with men (LMSM). The sample consisted of 499 LMSM, (Mage = 30.79), who endorsed engaging in same-sex sexual behavior. Results suggest evidence of concurrent validity of The Measure of Sexual Identity Exploration and Commitment (MoSIEC) with LMSM. Also, men who identified as heterosexual reported relatively higher levels of machismo and caballerismo. Implications for sexual identity development theory and research with LMSM is provided.

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2021

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Block and Tackle or Interfere: Student-Athletes Identities & Well-Being

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Athletic and academic identities among college student-athletes have been identified as important determinants of their academic achievement, career preparation, and sport termination. However, less is known about how these two identities, independently or simultaneously may be related to student-athletes’ overall

Athletic and academic identities among college student-athletes have been identified as important determinants of their academic achievement, career preparation, and sport termination. However, less is known about how these two identities, independently or simultaneously may be related to student-athletes’ overall (e.g., levels of optimism and happiness) or sport-wellbeing (e.g., satisfaction with one’s sport performance). To this end, the purpose of the study was to examine how student-athletes’ academic and athletic identities are associated with their overall and sport well-being in a U.S. national sample of 241 Division I student-athletes. I also examined whether the relationship between these two identities and well-being would be moderated by the student-athletes’ year in school, gender, or race. Because this study took place during the second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic (Summer of 2020), I also explored whether interruptions to school and sport activities due to the pandemic would also affect student-athletes reported overall and sport well-being. Results showed a significant positive relationship between academic identity and overall well-being, and a negative relationship between athletic identity and sport well-being. Additionally, year in school and race were significant correlates of sport well-being, with lowerclassmen student-athletes (first- and second-year students) and White student-athletes reporting higher levels of sport well-being than their counterparts. Race and gender were also significant predictors of overall well-being. Specifically, male student-athletes and White student-athletes reported higher levels of overall well-being than student-athletes identifying as female or as a person of color. Finally, results also indicated that COVID-19 were negatively associated with participants’ overall and sport well-being. However, the relationship between academic nor athletic identity and well-being (i.e., overall, sport well-being) were not moderated by self-reported rage, gender, year in school, or COVID-19 interruptions. After a review of the current literature and its limitations, findings and implications for practice with student-athletes are discussed.

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2022