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The Impact of Campus Outdoor Spaces on Student Happiness: A Case Study of the ASU Tempe Campus

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College and university campuses can play an important role in a student’s life, and campus outdoor spaces have the ability to positively impact various aspects of student health and well-being. It has long been understood that natural environments can promote

College and university campuses can play an important role in a student’s life, and campus outdoor spaces have the ability to positively impact various aspects of student health and well-being. It has long been understood that natural environments can promote health and well being, and in recent years research has begun to examine the impact of parks and landscapes in urban settings on subjective well-being (SWB). Subjective well-being (aka “happiness”) refers to
one’s self-reported measure of well-being and is thought of as having a high level of positive affect, low level of negative affect, and high degree of life satisfaction (Diener, 1984).

This study was conducted to assess the interrelationships between affective experiences, SWB, and usage of campus outdoor spaces in order to learn how outdoor spaces on the Arizona State University (ASU) Tempe campus can be enhanced to increase SWB and usage. In total, 832 students completed a survey questionnaire 1,140 times for six campus outdoor spaces. The results showed that students experience the greatest amount of happiness in the Secret Garden
and James Turrell ASU Skyspace, relaxation/restoration is the affective experience most strongly related to SWB, and SWB is negatively correlated with frequency of visits but positively link with duration of visits. To improve student happiness and usage of outdoor spaces on campuses, planners and designers should work on increasing the relaxing/restorative qualities of existing
locations, creating new spaces for relaxation/restoration around campus, reducing the perception of crowding and noise in large spaces, increasing fun/excitement by adding stimuli and/or opportunities for activity and entertainment, and adding equipment necessary for students to perform the activities they want. In addition to the ASU Tempe campus, the methodology and
findings of this research could be used to improve outdoor spaces on other college and university campuses and other types of outdoor environments.

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2019-05

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Living in Color: An Analysis of Feelings and Color in Relation to Marketing

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Companies can spend anywhere from hundreds to millions of dollars in creating as well as redesigning their logos and brand images. To make sure that they are creating their logos in an effective way, it is important to look at

Companies can spend anywhere from hundreds to millions of dollars in creating as well as redesigning their logos and brand images. To make sure that they are creating their logos in an effective way, it is important to look at how consumers will be affected by the choices that are made with the design.
The purpose of this paper is to examine how colors and orientations of logos affect consumer’s brand perception. This was done by distributing a survey that asked for participant’s feelings toward a certain subject. The survey first asked for the participant to define certain terms. Then, it asked what emotions the participants felt when thinking about certain colors. Finally, it asked users their opinions of logos after specific changes had been made. These changes include changing the colors of the original logos and changing the orientation of the original logos.
This paper will provide a look into over 600 participants' minds and how they perceive color. These participants were Arizona State University marketing students enrolled in Dr. John Eaton’s course during the 2020 Spring semester. This paper will provide recommendations to those looking to rebrand or create a brand logo.
After looking at the results of the survey and some outside research, it was hard to determine exactly what emotions consumers would feel with each color. Even though there was a large sample size, there were a lot of limitations in the survey which caused complications with the results. Due to these limitations, it made the correlation between specific colors and an emotion inconclusive.

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2020-05

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What's for Dinner?

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Food’s implication on culture and agriculture challenges agriculture’s identity in the age of the city. As architect and author Carolyn Steel explained, “we live in a world shaped by food, and if we realize that, we can use food as

Food’s implication on culture and agriculture challenges agriculture’s identity in the age of the city. As architect and author Carolyn Steel explained, “we live in a world shaped by food, and if we realize that, we can use food as a powerful tool — a conceptual tool, design tool, to shape the world differently. It triggers a new way of thinking about the problem, recognizing that food is not a commodity; it is life, it is culture, it’s us. It’s how we evolved.” If the passage of food culture is dependent upon the capacity for learning and transmitting knowledge to succeeding generations, the learning environments should reflect this tenability in its systematic and architectural approach.

Through an investigation of agriculture and cuisine and its consequential influence on culture, education, and design, the following project intends to reconceptualize the learning environment in order facilitate place-based practices. Challenging our cognitive dissonant relationship with food, the design proposal establishes a food identity through an imposition of urban agriculture and culinary design onto the school environment. Working in conjunction with the New American University’s mission, the design serves as a didactic medium between food, education, and architecture in designing the way we eat.

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Date Created
2017-05

Designing Social Behaviors

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Today, successful design is not only pleasing to the eye but may also help to manage social behaviors which can lead to increased satisfaction and increased revenue for clients. Designers function as problem solvers to provide solutions to challenges certain

Today, successful design is not only pleasing to the eye but may also help to manage social behaviors which can lead to increased satisfaction and increased revenue for clients. Designers function as problem solvers to provide solutions to challenges certain spaces face promoting or driving desired human interaction through effective design of the built environment. The experience-based economy of the 21st century prompts companies to attempt to stage an experience by connecting on a personal level with consumers in order to create value and support consumer needs. In experience-based design, interior design embraces social psychology by structuring the built environment to function as a tool to manage social interactions. Due to the nature of the human animal, social interactions in turn alter the culture of a specific place in an iterative process. Through this dynamic relationship, interior design can seek to either support the culture or function of a place and its users or work to effect change.

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2016-05