Matching Items (43)

133805-Thumbnail Image.png

The Narratives of the Women's March

Description

This study looked at the Women's March's use of social media to communicate their organization's mission. Data was collected from their official Twitter, Instagram and Facebook accounts. Facebook posts were

This study looked at the Women's March's use of social media to communicate their organization's mission. Data was collected from their official Twitter, Instagram and Facebook accounts. Facebook posts were collected manually, Twitter data was collected with a Google Sheets add-on and Instagram was collected by Picodash. All the posts were shifted through multiple times to identify the key narratives of the Women's March. These narratives were then compared to the stated "Unity Principles" of the organization to see if they aligned with what the Women's March attempted to fight for. The five narratives were "everyone should have access to affordable health care," "women should have access to positions of power and be respected," "immigrants should be welcomed within the United States," "society will be stronger if it addresses issues intersectionally," and "everyone should be safe in the world and treated as equals." Analysis showed that each of these narratives reflected the "Unity Principles" in some form. While certain narratives were related to more principles than others, it does not diminish the importance of each message.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

131277-Thumbnail Image.png

Narrative and Communication of Science: Effective Science Through Polymathy

Description

The process of communicating science between the general public and scientific community has been marked by several challenges in the modern setting. Namely, scientists’ trepidation toward misinterpretation, jeopardization of professional

The process of communicating science between the general public and scientific community has been marked by several challenges in the modern setting. Namely, scientists’ trepidation toward misinterpretation, jeopardization of professional reputability, and perception of two distinct arenas of communication has led to the perpetuation of the deficit model of communication. This model is exceptionally limiting as it effectively removes the scientists from the public sphere and can have devastating societal repercussions. The dialogue model of communication is a much more effective communicative model for the modern setting but has been met with resistance in its adoption. As communication as a whole is grounded in multiple foundational disciplines of psychology, philosophy, linguistics, and other fields, it would be apparent that the adoption of the principles of polymathy would serve to better prepare scientists to engage in mass communication with the public. As polymathy is a lifelong pursuit, the implementation of narrative training into collegiate undergraduate science curriculum would serve as a particularly potent beginning. That is, narrative's ability to reach near-universal audiences, enhance the recall and comprehension of complex subject matter, and forge an empathetic connection essential to effective communication is uniquely suited in ensuring a more effective communicative dynamic between the scientific community and the general public. As such, this thesis serves to advocate the adoption of narrative-based communicative training into undergraduate science curriculum not as separate courses, but rather as direct incorporation. This would serve to both revitalize polymathy in the modern age and prepare the next generation of scientists to be better equipped for the public dialogue.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

The Land

Description

The following is a documentary style film recounting the unique experience of the Freestone family, who moved to a remote part of Arizona in 2004, with eight of their twelve

The following is a documentary style film recounting the unique experience of the Freestone family, who moved to a remote part of Arizona in 2004, with eight of their twelve children. The Freestone’s built an Earthship (a home made from recycled materials) and lived there for seven years, with no running water or electricity. This project utilizes interviews with the parents, children, and grandparents to tell the story of living on “The Land.”

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-12

133863-Thumbnail Image.png

Liminal Space

Description

Liminal Space is a pen-and-paper roleplaying game designed to facilitate performative, personalized, and critical exploration of identity, value and truth dissensus; contemporary social, technological, political, and environmental issues; and modes

Liminal Space is a pen-and-paper roleplaying game designed to facilitate performative, personalized, and critical exploration of identity, value and truth dissensus; contemporary social, technological, political, and environmental issues; and modes of relating to socio-technical change, instability, and uncertainty. Pen-and-paper roleplaying games emerge from a 40-year history as an entertainment medium, but in recent decades have displayed the ability to personally speak to more "serious" issues. Mechanically, they combine elements of classroom or public-engagement, pedagogic, roleplaying exercises with benefits or participatory scenario construction, allowing players to immerse themselves in bespoke situations reflecting their personal interests, anxieties, and pedagogic aims and to reflexively and critically engage with contested truths or social disruptions in a safe space. Formal studies of roleplaying games are sparse, and I, the author, hope that Liminal Space can draw more study to a unique communication, entertainments, and performance medium and to the unique communities that surround it.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

131603-Thumbnail Image.png

Linguistic Content of Stories Told by Caregivers of Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Recipients

Description

Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is a treatment for hematologic malignancies. The procedure poses multiple medical risks ranging from infection to graft-versus-host disease. Patients must designate a full-time informal caregiver, typically

Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is a treatment for hematologic malignancies. The procedure poses multiple medical risks ranging from infection to graft-versus-host disease. Patients must designate a full-time informal caregiver, typically a family member. Caregivers assume multiple medical and logistical responsibilities. Distress and burden are common. Psychosocial interventions, including narrative-based interventions, may offer support for caregivers. This thesis makes use of data collected as part of a digital storytelling intervention for HCT caregivers. Participants were 6 caregivers of HCT survivors who participated in a 3-day digital storytelling workshop, culminating in the creation of a personal story about their experience as a caregiver in the form of a video with narration in their own voice. Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count (LIWC, 2015) was used to characterize content of the stories. Compared to norms (base rates of word usage provided by the LIWC developers), caregivers used more first-person plural pronouns. Such use of we-talk may indicate caregiver-patient dyadic strength given other research linking we-talk to communal coping. Counter to prediction, caregivers did not differ from norms with respect to use of negative affect words or cognitive process words. They did, however, use more biological process words (to be expected given their focus on health) and more words indicative of affiliation (understandable in light of their interpersonal connection to the patient and supportive care role). Further research is needed to examine potential change in linguistic content across the HCT trajectory (from pre-transplant through long-term survivorship), also to compare caregiver and patient stories.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

133765-Thumbnail Image.png

Rewriting the Narrative: A Discussion of Alzheimer's, the Arts, and Identity

Description

Alzheimer's disease and related dementias are a growing issue in the United States. While medical experts try to develop treatments or a cure, what are we as a society to

Alzheimer's disease and related dementias are a growing issue in the United States. While medical experts try to develop treatments or a cure, what are we as a society to do in the meantime to help those living with Alzheimer's? The arts seem to be an answer. In this thesis, I highlight numerous programs already in place across the United States that utilize the visual, musical, and dramatic arts to give people with Alzheimer's an avenue for expression, a connection to the world around them, as well as a better quality of life. I address the largely positive impact these arts engagement programs have on caregivers and their perceptions of their loved ones. I discuss what it means to have narrative identity and personhood in the midst of a disease that appears to strip those things away. Finally, I share my own experiences creatively engaging with residents at a local memory care facility and what those experiences demonstrated with regard to narrative, being, and Self. The examination of material and experiences demonstrates that art taps into innate parts of human beings that science is unable to touch or treat; however, the reverse is also true for science. When faced with an issue as complex as Alzheimer's disease, art and science are strongest together, and I believe the cure to Alzheimer's lies in this unity. In the meantime, we must utilize the arts to validate the Selves of and improve the quality of life for our growing Alzheimer's population.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

132938-Thumbnail Image.png

Re-Humanizing the Medical Field Through Narratives

Description

The medical field is one that depends on human interaction. I have noticed through my love of both English Literature and Medicine that one of the best ways to connect

The medical field is one that depends on human interaction. I have noticed through my love of both English Literature and Medicine that one of the best ways to connect people, is by sharing their stories. To accomplish this, I interviewed eleven physicians to understand their human story. From those interviews, I worked to emulate their voices, to create a chapter for each of them. Through this, I was able to understand what they personally went through to get to where they are today. This has allowed me to better understand the field I plan to be in.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

133047-Thumbnail Image.png

The Impact of Solo Female Travel and the Media in Creating a Counter Space and Counter Narrative

Description

In both historic and contemporary culture, society has created a distinct narrative surrounding solo female travel. The creation of this narrative has prevented many women from pursuing travel and outdoor

In both historic and contemporary culture, society has created a distinct narrative surrounding solo female travel. The creation of this narrative has prevented many women from pursuing travel and outdoor recreation, despite their various benefits. Both outdoor recreation and travel in the context of female involvement carry parallels in regards to the development of a counter space. Travel cannot be properly understood without understanding outdoor recreation, since the two are so inherently intertwined. Therefore, this thesis will analyze the benefits and counter space that travel and outdoor recreation provide. It will analyze the current media narrative, why the presence of cisgender and narrow-minded stereotypes prevent women from traveling and recreating outdoors, and analyze personal anecdotes from various women to further understand counter space in travel.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

148158-Thumbnail Image.png

War Trauma in American Literature

Description

This project is a critical analysis of the works of 6 American war veterans and how they demonstrate trauma in their narratives. The texts covered here are Philip Red

This project is a critical analysis of the works of 6 American war veterans and how they demonstrate trauma in their narratives. The texts covered here are Philip Red Eagle’s Red Earth (2007), John A. Williams’ Captain Blackman (1972), Roy Scranton’s War Porn (2016), Tim O’Brien’s The Things They Carried (1990), Kurt Vonnegut’s Slaughterhouse-Five (1969), and Joseph Heller’s Catch-22 (1961).

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

Around the world in 22 years: A personal journey

Description

A journalistic, first-person narrative going through the lessons learned from travel. The story is complemented by a series of photos from childhood to the present all uploaded to a Wix-based website.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05